Battlefield 4 Will Not Have Modding Support

Mod support in a game is something near and dear to the hearts of PC gamers everywhere. Whenever there’s a new game out on the PC, the first question that’s asked by players is whether the game will have support for mods or editing tools.

The same holds true for Battlefield 4, which much to our chagrin, DICE has confirmed that the game will not come with any mod support. Though it comes as no surprise, the news is no less dismaying.

“We also would like to see more player-created content, but we would never do something like this if we feel we couldn’t do this 100%,” said DICE general manager Karl-Magnus Troedsson in an interview with PC Gamer.

“That means we need to have the right tools available, we need to have the right security around this regarding what parts of the engine we let loose, so to say. So for Battlefield 4 we don’t have any planned mod support, I have to be blunt about saying that. We don’t.”

Despite the fact that Battlefield 4 will not have mod support, the idea in general isn’t something that DICE has given up on, and says it may have plans to implement in a future Battlefield title.

“When we think about Battlefield as a franchise, moving forward, it’s a big franchise. And we’re talking about this, almost as strategies for the company – where are we going, what are we trying to do with the franchise, et cetera. And this is definitely one of the areas that we have been discussing quite a bit,” Troedsson said.

Battlefield 4 is set for release on the PC, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 this October. It will be out at a later date for the Xbox One and PlayStation 4.

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4 Comments on Battlefield 4 Will Not Have Modding Support

Mike

On June 13, 2013 at 7:06 pm

I’m still hoping they’ll be pals and give up the engine so people can make a successor to Battlefield 2142 that DICE doesn’t seem to recognize NEEDS to be made.

SXO

On June 14, 2013 at 6:25 am

Probably the biggest non-news in regards to BF4. I’m pretty sure nobody expected modding tools considering their stance on the subject with BF3. And as far as modding tools in a future title, never going to happen as long as EA owns them. Tools like that cost money to develop, and potentially cut into DLC sales, neither of which EA is very keen on.

BoBALOSA

On June 15, 2013 at 10:44 am

i truly believe the main reason a game will survive through time is because of mods and the mod community. half-life series, total war series, homeworld(s), company of heroes, SINS, GTA series, the list goes on. hell, just check out the top right corner of the home page and you will see a very large list of games that can be modded – “networks”. i also believe EA does not like it when people make modded content that improves or rather helps their game(s).

its like hearing a spoiled little kid that only wants to do what they want to do. making that “kid” difficult to handle on its own, -mods that can add single player items, new/better maps, weapons, etc. and difficult to have friends with others, -having a solid good heart community with little to no kids/teensagers. why? because mods filter out the gamer who just wants to play it because its new, and the gamer who wants to drive deeper in to the games universe.

in modded communities i feel it creates a chance for persons to help each other with problems, bugs, crashes etc.. a real person to creator/developer conversation rather then read the game forums about people ing and complain about the games engine, stats, characters, and of course waiting for updates from the developers.

an example of this would be reading the forums from the game RUSE, a non-modded game. the forums are full of complaints, “please allow modding”, to questions asking why they made changes the way they did, ing about the stats for units…get the picture. now compare it to the game Hearts of Iron III or Total war series, modded games. the older total war games have stopped being updated and thats fine, the modders will take over to continue tweaking and updating….for little donations to no pay at all.

give people the tools to build anything and they will. half-life series – DoD, CS, FT, all mods turned in to full games to buy. or take BF42 Desert Storm (mod), and you later get the game BF2. so like i said above, this is where you see a higher number of friendly community of persons wanting to give construction comments. whether its reporting bugs, to helping with beta testing for mods, people want to help people who want to help others.

psycros

On June 16, 2013 at 9:42 am

Without mods PC gaming will effectively die. And maybe that’s their plan. I’m starting to see a pattern forming, with Microsoft doing all it can to dumb down the PC and game devs doing as little as possible to support the PC gaming scene (even though its by far the biggest platform). They want the PC to die. Instead they want us all using overpriced, underpowered “internet appliances” where every button click, every swipe and every login are monetized. They want game development to be as cheap and quick as possible, so they can continue cranking out CoD clones and little else. They want all non-console gaming to be casual gaming. The only thing that’s kept EA and Microsoft from declaring all-out war on the serious gamer – particularly on PC – is the fact that most of us would rather game on a powerful and flexible machine with superior input devices. Mark my words: they will attempt to slowly and quietly strangle everything that makes PC gaming better in order to drive us away from the desktop. And we have to push back with everything we’ve got. Support the good indie devs. Support the great kickstarters that put PC first. And of course, support the major studios that keep showing the PC gamer love (Bethesda, et al). Support those who don’t require restrictive DRM. Keep showing the studios and publishers that the PC desktop and PC gaming aren’t going away, and that hostility towards either will cost them dearly.