BioShock Infinite Review: A Gleaming City of Unrealized Potential

But BioShock Infinite never quite says anything. At least a full third of the game concerns the tensions between the white-bred power brokers of Columbia — Comstock the prophet and Jeremiah Fink the industrial robber baron, espousing the furthest exaggeration of modern far-right politics and movements such as the Tea Party — and the Vox Populi, a people’s movement ostensibly consisting of non-white ethnic groups under the boot-heel of the rich white folks (that could easily be related to modern movement such as Occupy Wall Street, although with a great deal less accuracy than the conservative characters). Players find themselves on the side of the Vox by necessity early on, and a period spent venturing through the Ku Klux Klan-like Fraternity of the Raven during the first level will likely incite you against the racist jerks on Comstock’s side, but it’s not long before Infinite goes with the idea that Everyone With Any Power Kinda Sucks. Rather than make any true comment about populist movements, racism or fascism, the game and Levine opt not to pick sides, and thus not potentially offend anyone.

Unrealized potential marks the entire Columbia experience, as if the game was always poised to act, but as you get close to its walls and characters, you realize you’re on a movie set and it’s all a big illusion. There are a few (great) moments in which Booker and Elizabeth wander through Columbia and find it lived-in, either by the comfortable or the downtrodden. These moments, however, inevitably turn to big shootouts with police or other enemies with the citizens abruptly vanishing, and the potential energy of any given scene never really becomes kinetic energy. When the revolution happens, you mostly hear it in the distance, or walk past its fires and its bodies (which lose a lot of their emotional impact when you’re constantly rifling through their pockets). You’ll spend the game pursued by the enigmatic, robotic Songbird, for example, without the creature ever engaging you outside of a cutscene. The majority of your time in Columbia consists of walking around having conversations with Elizabeth and looting things, before stumbling on a large group of enemies for something of a lackluster battle.

It’s not that combat in Infinite is bad. Players will find a number of interesting weapons that can be upgraded over time, but can only carry two at a time — they range from machine guns and pistols to shotguns that spray fire and RPGs. Compounding that, like in BioShock, is the addition of “vigors,” which convey superpowers to the player like the ability to set people on fire, electrocute them, or suspend them in the air for easy shooting. The eight vigors you eventually get allow for some free-form combat opportunities that can sometimes be very fun to experiment with and utilize.

The problem is that we’ve been here already. Six years ago, BioShock put the very same power in players’ hands, mixing shotguns with throwing lightning bolts, machine guns with launching killer bees at people, and grenade launchers with the ability to possess the weak-minded. Though the vigors are slightly different in appearance and action from BioShock’s plasmids, the overall effect is the same.

Meanwhile, enemy AI and variety feels lifted from BioShock almost verbatim. You’ll fight police officers who: come at you with billy clubs; shoot at you with pistols; shoot at you with shotguns; shoot at you with machine guns; and fling fire your way. These enemies don’t differ meaningfully from BioShock’s splicers at all, down to the fact that they’ll often take bullets to the face and keep coming with no real regard for their personal safety. Six years ago, we could buy that these folks were crazy and that they lacked personal control. In 2013, this just feels like lazy AI design.

Combat in Infinite does often excel with its two new mechanics: skylines and tears. Skylines are tracks that sometimes encircle battlefields, giving Booker the ability to hop on and use them, rollercoaster-style, to move around the environment, gain elevation, drop on enemies for powerful melee attacks, and relocate quickly. Skylines can often change the tenor of a battle from forcing players to hide behind cover to stay clear of enemy fire, to being incredibly kinetic and vertical. Fights on skylines, in which players hang from one hand and fire guns from the other, make for some of the best and most intense moments in Infinite, although the mechanic suffers severely from the fact that once you’ve gone around a track twice, you’ve pretty much experienced the highlights of that particular fight.

The second mechanic is Elizabeth’s ability to open holes between your dimension and other, parallel universes, often bringing objects that don’t exist in Infinite’s ostensible reality into being. In practical terms, that means you can be fighting in an open area and command Elizabeth to warp in a turret or fresh supplies or a chunk of cover, and that can often change the battle.

Join the Conversation   

* required field

By submitting a comment here you grant GameFront a perpetual license to reproduce your words and name/web site in attribution. Inappropriate or irrelevant comments will be removed at an admin's discretion.

36 Comments on BioShock Infinite Review: A Gleaming City of Unrealized Potential

Michael

On March 29, 2013 at 7:44 pm

Great review.
Playing the P.C. is the way to go with this game. I really dispise FPS games but someone who loves FPS games bought it for me because they loved the way the game looked and needed me to revitalise my faith in the genre which is plagued by the miltary style gameplay.

This game had alot of unoriginal ideas that is taken from different types of movies like Dark City, Mr. Nobody, The Nines and Looper. I was looking forward toward alot of unanswered questions and gaps in this game.

I’ll say this, its the best FPS game I played since Goldeneye and Perfect Dark for the N64. But when it ended I didnt bother wanting to play this game again. Developers always fail when it comes to game endings especially when it comes to there third game in the series.

Mike

On March 29, 2013 at 7:54 pm

“that could easily be related to modern movement such as Occupy Wall Street, although with a great deal less accuracy than the conservative characters”

Ok, I can’t let this go.

I’m actually shocked that you seem to have missed what Ken Levine was showing Phil. It wasn’t a comment on the tea party or occupy, it was a commentary on Fascism and Communism. What the Vox end up doing is the very essence of the Communist agenda (essentially what Stalin and the rest of history’s Reds did to their respective upper echelons when “the People” took power). All he’s doing is showing the folly of following either extreme philosophy, and that both are two sides of the same coin. As an aside, I don’t know what Occupy movement you’re talking about, but I went to the Oakland rally to talk to some of those people, and some of them wanted to do EXACTLY what the Vox did, so it was quite accurate I would say.

Critique

On March 29, 2013 at 10:22 pm

Thanks for the review.
The game has many flaws, but the story kinda offset the whole bad things about the game to and overall everything bad became trivial for me.
I totally agree with your score though. I also would like to know what’s the point of the vigor system.

thejfather1

On March 29, 2013 at 10:25 pm

Even though i love all the perfect scores games get, i have to admit, this is a more well rounded review. I agree that it is a really good game, but just a few things about it keep it from being “perfect” or truly groundbreaking.

I hate to say it though…..

Evernessince

On March 29, 2013 at 10:50 pm

This was my first bioshock game so I didn’t get the same repetitive feeling that the review had. Although on the review I must say that it is well written I enjoyed reading about your bioshock experience.

On that, they really did miss a beat, so to speak. I felt like I was being pushed forward into more fighting when all I wanted to do was mess around in columbia. It’s a beautiful world that could have been much more, if the player was allowed sandboxes, similar to the witcher 2.

Another point of discomfort for me was at the end.
*************
SPOILERS
************
When Elizabeth kills DeWitt, it kinda reeks of missed opportunity. I was like “wow my daughter just killed me and I didn’t even get to give her one moment of happiness.” Even on the beach, your forced to make DeWitt interrupt Elizibeth’s dancing. It makes DeWitt seem miserable even though his whole adventure is about clearing his debt. Your forced to keep on killing, no downtime.

random

On March 29, 2013 at 11:42 pm

i would have to agree with most of the review. and having just finished the game less then 10 minutes ago i felt dissapointed with the ending, seeing as i was thinking it was going to end something like this about half way through the game. seems like a slap in the face to make the game end the way it did though

dakan45

On March 30, 2013 at 3:02 am

The problem with this game is that it is entierelly too linear. Feels like being on railway ride rather a bioshock game with nonlniearity and exlporations.Also it is too fps. Everything is super powerfull and effective and in the end immersive but has no replay value and you often be annoyed at the wasted potential that this game has to exploring the city nad upgarding your skills.

So much focus gone on elizabeth rather the actual freaking gameplay.

Andrés

On March 30, 2013 at 8:06 am

It’s good to see a review that can spot the strengths and faults of the game rather than stick a 10/10 and lavish it with praise. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still a good game, but certainly not a 10. I myself regretted that interactions with Columbia were limited to gunning people down and, in hindsight, the narrative does feel forced more than half the time, particularly during the shatterpoints that must occur in a certain manner so that the game will reach its confusing conclusion. Can we expect a more detailed analysis of the ending?

Truthbot

On March 30, 2013 at 9:27 am

Thanks for the honest review. Journalists treat this game like it’s the 2nd coming. It’s like GTA IV all over again. I think it’s a good game, but not even the best I’ve played this year, and it’s early in the year.

Gus (Arg)

On March 30, 2013 at 9:32 am

Good article Phil! I agree with most of what you have said in your review.

I really enjoyed the game, but in my opinion, there are a lot of things that were not covered/explored. As you said, there’s potential here, but the developers didn’t take advantage of that.
Elizabeth’s AI is awesome. I really love how she interacted with me during the game. The Lutece brothers were a good addition to the game’s plot. I also enjoyed the ending sequence (including the post-credits part).

On the negative side, enemies looked the same to me. In most occasions, I felt that the only thing that I was supposed to do is to shoot everyone I had in my sight.
Songbird is an interesting character, but it’s not properly used.
Columbia looked amazing, but I felt like my actions as DeWitt didn’t have the proper weight on the city’s fate.
One thing I miss from the first Bioshock is the feeling of danger lurking in every corner. You could feel the Splicers stalking you in the dark.

RC

On March 30, 2013 at 6:02 pm

Reading this makes me think that, if this game was made by CDProjekt Red, they would release an Extended Edition of it a year from now. :D

Loveless

On March 30, 2013 at 7:03 pm

First off gotta say well done review. I think you nailed a lot of the qualities of this game that made it both fantastic and a little disappointing at the same time. However, I have to say comparing either of the fanatical groups in this game to either the Occupy movement or Tea Party screams of a lack of knowlegde of either group. Your fantastic at game reviews but leave the political commentary to the talking heads on cable, stick to what you know.

Once again though Gamefront shows that it is the best site to get reviews from. You guys review honestly and that’s the main reason I keep coming back for more.

Ed

On March 31, 2013 at 8:23 am

My play-style in this game is to take it incredibly slowly so I’m only in Shantytown at the moment after numerous hours, but having skimmed this solid review I’d definitely agree with a lot of it. The opening 3 or so hours (for me anyway) was probably the best opening to a game I can think of. Absolutely stunning. Gameplay-wise it’s starting to get a little tired for me now but Elizabeth and the world itself is impressing me so much that I’m not particularly bothered. The overall presentation is absolutely 10/10 too. Love the little touches like the ‘God only knows’ barbershop quartet and bits like playing the guitar in the Shantytown bar. Fascinated to see how the ending leads you to say ‘The conclusion might have some plot holes, but it’s at least the most satisfying ending to a game in quite some time’ but also that it’s hard to buy the twist. A bit worrying as I’ve taken pains to find and pay attention to all the story elements. Still, at this stage I’m seeing so much done right that Bioshock Infinite is hard not to love.

Ed

On March 31, 2013 at 8:27 am

Oh and also, I’d suggest that the best elements of the game are a step forward for AAA titles in general. A landmark, as Bioshock was, if not with a few more things to quibble about.

JC

On March 31, 2013 at 5:33 pm

This game breaks everything in existence , of course its not perfect nothing is. But its hands down a marvelous feat of creativity. And it easily takes the “Best video game to day ” title.
If you cant see that, you might be one of the fallowing:
A desperate review writer looking for more views (bad story sell better than good).
An unfortunately deprived soul who has not been able to experience this game your self. (perhaps you you tubed it ).
You played the game but your brain is to underdeveloped to wrap around the narrative and story.
If you have not played this game and you enjoy FPS and RPGs, you should not think even twice before picking this up and playing as fully immersed as possible. you will not regret it. Dont Listen to any of the above listed trolls. and enjoy the ride.

concarcobee

On March 31, 2013 at 10:56 pm

this is the best review out there/most honest, if your an fps gamer this is probably the most ground breaking thing you have ever played, but if your an rpg gamer or story gamer its nothing all that ground breaking, my biggest beef is tht i had this game literally on hold for a year and found i beat it( on hard, getting all recording ect.) in three days /without multi endings and choices not changing the story in any meaningful way i felt let down….what exactly did we wait an extra year for? dont get me wrong this would make an amazing movie (by the guy that did oldboy)!!!!!!***POSSABLE SPOILER***Also by the end i felt insectual and let down by the way the story did not realise what felt like was the best path for it to take, made the twist feel forced and a foe attempt a artistic novalty.

Foehunter82

On April 1, 2013 at 1:09 am

Didn’t Yahtzee from Zero Punctuation once say that BioShock was really a steampunk version of SystemShock? Now Bioshock Infinite is essentially Bioshock?

Lolkin

On April 2, 2013 at 12:21 am

Your review suggests that you expected Bioshock Infinite to be an Uber-Ultra-RPG, not an FPS game.

Really?

On April 2, 2013 at 9:37 am

I don’t think you quite understood the ending twist, Phil. Your commentary on the combat and gameplay shows you know what you’re talking about in that respect, but many of your complaints show that you weren’t paying attention to the story. I don’t think you even saw the real twist in the story (the one that was implied, not the one that is directly given to you).

Phil Hornshaw

On April 2, 2013 at 10:26 am

@Lolkin

You think? I disagree. I think the FPS structure doesn’t really fit with Columbia or the story being told, but I also don’t think it needs to be left behind — but when your only two mechanics in the game are “shoot a dude” or “loot the corpse,” that limits what Columbia can be and how you can participate in its story. The addition of one or two more gameplay mechanics do not an RPG make. Conversations could be one, but even BioShock had hacking, for example. In Infinite, your only means to adding to the world is to blow up the people inside it. I don’t think that sounds like an RPG, necessarily.

Phil Hornshaw

On April 3, 2013 at 9:06 am

@Really

Uh, okay. Thanks? In fact, I paid a lot of attention to the story, but my issues mostly stem from its convoluted nature and not the subject matter at hand. I’ve actually studied up a great deal on the kinds of elements BioShock Infinite is throwing around (I actually even wrote a book about it [kind of] — SO YOU CREATED A WORMHOLE), and in addition to that I’ve talked extensively with my colleagues about the game’s story. So…not sure what it is you’re talking about. But feel free to enlighten me — hit me up on Twitter (@philhornshaw) or email me at phil at gamefront dot com.

Andrés

On April 3, 2013 at 6:54 pm

@Phil Hornshaw

First, your book looks like a riot so I’m picking it up.

About the ending, I think it might have gone over the writers’ heads. They bring up the multiverse but quickly set up rules that limit where it comes from, the (simplified) notion that there’s an infinite number of universes for every choice that we make. When you bring up subjects that exist in the real world, you kind of expect them to be based in our real world understanding of them.

Phil Hornshaw

On April 3, 2013 at 7:02 pm

@Andres

Thanks!

Yeah, my major issue is that BI operates on its own set of rules and they’re delivered rather quickly. For the most part, the internal logic of the game is pretty sound, though. It just can take a bit to fully understand that internal logic.

DaveTheJackal

On April 4, 2013 at 11:47 am

“vigor system is too close to that of Plasmids from BioShock, and lacks a justification in the setting of Columbia” – Fink stole them from a tear as he did most of his “inventions”. You get this from voxphone recordings.

TBH the only thing I thought that got repetitive was Elizabeth throwing things – which was an “extra” I guess.

Phil Hornshaw

On April 4, 2013 at 1:15 pm

@DaveTheJackal

It’s not that they don’t say, “oh, here’s where they came from,” it’s that vigors don’t fit the game. Plasmids make sense in Ryan’s Rapture, where science isn’t bound by ethics and everyone is trying to outpace everyone else. Why would superpowers just be available in Columbia? And to take it further, how come almost no one uses them?

Plus, dumping those bits of exposition in voxophones is a real problem with the game’s story delivery.

DaveTheJackal

On April 4, 2013 at 3:05 pm

*** SPOILER ***

The reason vigors are in is the same reason stolen music (beach boys, tears for fears, michael jackson) is in there (also revealed in voxophones). To get the idea of the tears in there and to show what an effect they are having on the world. True, vigors are not that widely in use but we regularly come in to contact with crows and firemen… I agree they could have added more but then a lot of games lose things in the edit (i.e. fitting them on to those diskless f****** xboxes).

Indeed there is indication that the handymen and even songbird were stolen from a rapture like world …

*** SPOILER ***

There is not any spoon feeding of story here but it is there if you want to look … it is a game to be replayed Though the combat does get tedious second time round, well Elizabeth throwing things does, You pick so much up the second time. It really was there for you to pick up if only you’d seen it.

Also you need to look up the “many worlds interpretation” of quantum mechanics. That is the basis of the whole game “universe”. It is a well known idea in physics and was named by a guy called DeWitt.

Now that name seems familiar.

*** SPOILER ***

Just like with the original Bioshock, where knowing who Ayn Rand (sound like And. Ryan?) is and what she wrote gives you loads more out of the game, doing a little research pays massive dividends.

Lucette mentions as a little girl watching a girl who was her and not her watching a girl and so on … this is a reference to Brian W Aldiss’s book “Report on Probability A” which is all about many worlds and people watching people. There are also numerous references to Schrodinger’s Cat and “superposition”. Not to mention Columbia being held aloft with quantum mechanics… and so on. Oh and there is respawning. Every time you die you open a door on a world in which you never died…

Yes it may come across as a slightly strange shooter which doesn’t quite make sense but if you know your stuff, take in all the clues (took me at least a day to think it over after playing to even start to “get it”)… it is all there.

*** SPOILER ***

What is many worlds: ok so the basic idea is that most things behave like a wave at subatomic scales … however under certain circumstances they suddenly become particles (boy is this a simplification!) and many worlds says “well the wave didn’t go away, it is still there and the particle is just like a dot on that wave still connected to all the other parts of that wave but they are somewhere else, somewhere where the particle appeared elsewhere on that wave”. So in other words, everytime something happens (a wave turns in to a particle) all possible versions of that event occur spawning infinite worlds all mysteriously separated from each other. This happens continually, all the time, everywhere, not million millions as elizabeth says but infinite infinites.

I am still thinking about the ending. My current version is that Elizabeth removes the barrier between the worlds… that is what her power is. As we see all the time, people get a nose bleed and go crazy as they unite with their selves from another world where she opened a tear to … gaining the memories of being killed etc.

Slate clearly remembers a different history to comstock and has been affected by memories brought through by elizabeth’s tears.

At the end of the game booker has a nose bleed and suddenly remembers the baby exchange. He is remembering memories from another world … not his own history. When the elizabeths drown dewitt they are using their special finger loss powers now turned up to the max to collapse all the worlds together and kill all the dewitts that lead to comstock at once … it was elizabeth the twins needed to get to the baptism not really dewitt.

That said, we pass through at least 3 different Columbias, who says there is one coherent narrative that fits across all of them?

*** SPOILER ***

DaveTheJackalX

On April 4, 2013 at 3:05 pm

*** SPOILER ***

The reason vigors are in is the same reason stolen music (beach boys, tears for fears, michael jackson) is in there (also revealed in voxophones). To get the idea of the tears in there and to show what an effect they are having on the world. True, vigors are not that widely in use but we regularly come in to contact with crows and firemen… I agree they could have added more but then a lot of games lose things in the edit (i.e. fitting them on to those diskless f****** xboxes).

Indeed there is indication that the handymen and even songbird were stolen from a rapture like world …

*** SPOILER ***

There is not any spoon feeding of story here but it is there if you want to look … it is a game to be replayed Though the combat does get tedious second time round, well Elizabeth throwing things does, You pick so much up the second time. It really was there for you to pick up if only you’d seen it.

Also you need to look up the “many worlds interpretation” of quantum mechanics. That is the basis of the whole game “universe”. It is a well known idea in physics and was named by a guy called DeWitt.

Now that name seems familiar.

*** SPOILER ***

Just like with the original Bioshock, where knowing who Ayn Rand (sound like And. Ryan?) is and what she wrote gives you loads more out of the game, doing a little research pays massive dividends.

Lucette mentions as a little girl watching a girl who was her and not her watching a girl and so on … this is a reference to Brian W Aldiss’s book “Report on Probability A” which is all about many worlds and people watching people. There are also numerous references to Schrodinger’s Cat and “superposition”. Not to mention Columbia being held aloft with quantum mechanics… and so on. Oh and there is respawning. Every time you die you open a door on a world in which you never died…

Yes it may come across as a slightly strange shooter which doesn’t quite make sense but if you know your stuff, take in all the clues (took me at least a day to think it over after playing to even start to “get it”)… it is all there.

*** SPOILER ***

What is many worlds: ok so the basic idea is that most things behave like a wave at subatomic scales … however under certain circumstances they suddenly become particles (boy is this a simplification!) and many worlds says “well the wave didn’t go away, it is still there and the particle is just like a dot on that wave still connected to all the other parts of that wave but they are somewhere else, somewhere where the particle appeared elsewhere on that wave”. So in other words, everytime something happens (a wave turns in to a particle) all possible versions of that event occur spawning infinite worlds all mysteriously separated from each other. This happens continually, all the time, everywhere, not million millions as elizabeth says but infinite infinites.

I am still thinking about the ending. My current version is that Elizabeth removes the barrier between the worlds… that is what her power is. As we see all the time, people get a nose bleed and go crazy as they unite with their selves from another world where she opened a tear to … gaining the memories of being killed etc.

Slate clearly remembers a different history to comstock and has been affected by memories brought through by elizabeth’s tears.

At the end of the game booker has a nose bleed and suddenly remembers the baby exchange. He is remembering memories from another world … not his own history. When the elizabeths drown dewitt they are using their special finger loss powers now turned up to the max to collapse all the worlds together and kill all the dewitts that lead to comstock at once … it was elizabeth the twins needed to get to the baptism not really dewitt.

That said, we pass through at least 3 different Columbias, who says there is one coherent narrative that fits across all of them?

*** SPOILER ***

Dan Miller

On April 4, 2013 at 9:31 pm

My biggest pet peeve with Infinite is small, but I think it highlights how “off” I think the basic game design is here:

The majority of the experience consists of shoot everything for 30 seconds, then loot everything for a minute. You have to keep looting, because the mana costs for your vigors are outrageous, so you need mana constantly. Half of combat (vigors) is out the window unless you are constantly rifling through every… ing… cabinet…

It pulls you out of the action constantly, and doesn’t let you ever get into a flow playing the game. Every game deals with health and a magic resource in different ways, but Infinite’s destroys the character (why would DeWitt feverishly search every room, body, and cereal box in any of these situations?), feels random, draws you out of the combat [which is mediocre and unchallenging anyway], and breaks up the flow of moving seamlessly from locale to locale (a major issue for a game that leans heavily on atmosphere created by impressive locales).

Basically, I can’t get over it and the combat and story aren’t compelling enough to keep me from wanting to shotgun every piece of furniture.

Denis

On April 5, 2013 at 10:01 am

The shooter mechanics of the game were completely outdated and step back. The weapon upgrade system was an vanilla as it gets. It seems like the “shock” series has been regressing ever since System Shock 2, to make it more about appealing to the COD console shooter crowd than to actually innovate the genre.

eddy

On April 10, 2013 at 10:24 am

Can’t agree more with your review, in the end I was not surprised by the ending and it’s huge leaps. It is a Re-skin of bioshock 1, a really pretty and sometimes amazing re-skin, but the game could be better. *spoilers* And the lack of a proper final boss is so disappointing. The game builds up to this massive fight and then…cutscene. I left with a bad taste after seeing the universal praise the game is receiving. Good game, amazing graphics, cool gameplay…story…not so much…like other reviewer sai, we don’t need another bioshock in a while.

David

On April 14, 2013 at 3:23 am

This game is far better than Phil Hornshaw says. There is a reason this game is getting perfect scores from multiple reviewers and it’s because the game play is phenomenal, Columbia is stunning, Booker and Elizabeth are great and the story is also great. The audio logs give great insight to what’s really going on and the enemies are a great mix. As for the ending, to me it was perfect and leaves plenty open for the dlc to come. I won’t spoil the ending but it was pretty easy to understand if you have a decent IQ.

Anyone on the fence about buying this game should buy it immediately.

Alter

On April 18, 2013 at 5:44 am

Hey Dave,
First off, saying something is “not spoonfed” is a self-congratulatory way of calling the story’s presentation exclusionary or elitist. But whatever. That’s not important. What is important is that the recordings were from living people who the character had access to. In BioShock, they were the historical records of the collapsed culture whose remains you were wading through. They were also contextually presented so that they were part of the atmosphere. Infinite used recordings as little more than voice-over narration, the laziest from of storytelling possible. So, BioShock did the same thing, better.

That’s not even the first time that Infinite poorly imitated something that BioShock already did. You talk a lot about understanding plots and such, and I plan to get to that in a bit, but I don’t think you really understood what Plasmids were in BioShock. Plasmids were refined unobtainium. The only way you could get a plasmid was by feeding this super-scarce resource through a machine that would turn it into a genetic tail that makes you shoot ice out your hands.. with genetics,,. Adam was the ultimate resource in a game that was heavy in economic theory. It was significant. Vigors are bought from a machine with change.. Or given to you freely. Vigors are just an extension of the “wish-fulfillment” angle of the game’s “this game is about games” meta theme, and they felt alien to the world because of it.

**Spoilers**

So, now that I’ve brought up the meta theme, that is, that the game is actually about games and gamers and not about actual characters, I don’t think that you really understood the end. You’re ignoring the obvious paradox created by using figerportalmagic to kill every possible version of your own father before you were born. Its not something that makes even the barest sense except that it doesn’t work, thereby only restarting the primary theme of of cycles of violence. The cycle theme is repeated often enough (I’ve made it quite clear that I don’t believe in the exercise) to stick out, and most importantly, from a meta-perspective, the cycle begins again every time anyone starts up a new game of BioShock Infinite. So in the end, where Elizabeth (who represents the future of humanity) drowns Booker/Comstock (who represents the savagery of humanity’s past,) this represents the ultimate rejection of the very violence at the core of the game, and her failure to end the cycle of violence is highlighted by the opening scene of each new game started.

To put it another way, the core message of the game is that it is a bad game and you shouldn’t play it any more. IOW, you shouldn’t choose to feed those primitive, violent impulses. I feel that the repetitive and unrewarding game play helps aid in this message. tenoutoften

Ninjastyle

On April 20, 2013 at 6:11 am

Phil Hornshaw clearly has a little taste. This game got less score than Antichamber, Borderlands 2 and Mass Effect 3 DLC. Same score as Gears of War Judgement (trash made in less than a year) and Age of Empires HD.
This is so unprofessional. I prefer first 3 hours of Bioshock Infinite to all of the mentioned above.
Horrible review and horrible taste, this website does not deserve to be taken seriously.

FUFI

On April 30, 2013 at 9:20 am

Crap review.
Best game iv played in years.Im right you are wrong
Dont hate a game because it makes you think

FUFI

On April 30, 2013 at 9:24 am

Crap review.
Best game iv played in years.
Wait for DLC

Phil Hornshaw

On May 1, 2013 at 12:22 pm

@FUFI

On the contrary, I love that the game makes you think. I just wish it thought more about what it has to say, or made more sense, or committed more to a message…..