Move Over DayZ, Rust Takes Steam’s Top Spot

UPDATE: Garry Newman has informed Twitter that the 40 percent figure in the GI story has now jumped to 55 percent.

Original Story:

Conclusion: survival sims are so hot right now.

How else do you explain the early access version of DayZ remaining atop the Steam best sellers list for a full month? And what game finally managed to bump it down a slot? Oh, just another early access survival sim.

Yep, after weeks in the second slot, Rust is now Steam’s top seller. In fact, there were more active players in Rust over the weekend than DayZ. That’s saying something considering DayZ is now well past 1 million copies sold.

Rust is the creation of Garry Newman, the man famous for Garry’s Mod, and he spoke with GamesIndustry about Rust’s surprising success.

“We never, ever expected anything to dwarf GMod’s success,” Newman said. “I did some rough maths this morning: in terms of profits, from sales and royalties, in a month Rust has made about 40 percent of what GMod has made in about nine years. We can’t really believe it.”

Newman recently revealed that GMod has sold more than 3.5 million copies since its 2006 launch, so it’s safe to say Rust is crushing it.

As for replacing DayZ as Steam’s top seller, Newman said he believes both games are good for one another.

“We’re kind of flattered to be mentioned in the same sentence as DayZ, to be honest, because it was kind of our inspiration, it’s why we started Rust in the first place. I think it being out at the same time is probably doing us more good than if it wasn’t, though. Everyone who’s playing Day Z now is probably hearing about Rust and a lot of them are ending up playing Rust too. I don’t think people are going to decide on just one.”

I think Newman’s assessment is accurate. People really, really want to play survival sims at the moment, and with DayZ in such a buggy early-alpha state, more and more are turning to Rust. And for good reason: Rust is much further along right now than DayZ. Here’s to hoping Newman and his team at Facepunch translate their success into a polished final game.

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4 Comments on Move Over DayZ, Rust Takes Steam’s Top Spot

rickshaw

On January 20, 2014 at 8:41 pm

Comparing the two they both have bad communities.
I suppose one over the other I would give DayZ a nod for at least attempting to help you and having good forum practices.
Rust on the other hand has really bad player activity they just don’t like you building or being in the game at all.
The Rust forum community I class as the worst place in world.
They got to be rudest of them any forum ever! even the management don’t care, during last year it was the pits, they’d kick you for just asking for a key and kick you for any remark you might want to ask or make. Garry himself was a right and the rules in forum were dumb..
now Garry’s earning, his changed his face. I think I’ll call him two faced.

Jeco0357

On January 21, 2014 at 10:42 am

not anymore

Ignatius Reilly

On January 22, 2014 at 8:51 am

I have a bad feeling there is going to be a case study at the end of this that is going to steer people away from early access games. From most of what I have read, the games are largely incomplete, and yet, they are selling for $20 and $30. My understanding is also that the updates are far and few between – I suppose why would you finish your game if you are already selling it like gangbusters as is. I am willing to make a prediction that neither of these games is ever completed. Along with others in the genre, like Nether and 7D2D (which has a whopping $35 price point for a beta game). My guess is a non-Indie developer like Sony will see the trend and develop something that is actually polished.

Foehunter82

On January 22, 2014 at 10:44 am

@Ignatius: While I agree with you for the most part, the big developers are hit and miss when it comes to content, quality, polish, etc.