NEWSFLASH: Yet Another Developer Doesn't Like Used Games Market

We can add Crystal Dynamics global brand direct Karl Stewart to the list of folks in the games industry who don’t really like that you like buying used games.
“I think the model as we see it right now is a frail one. Having the used market is not beneficial to any of us,” Stewart told CVG. He also referenced EA’s Project Ten Dollar as being the kind of model that will work.
“Some of the plays that have been made more recently about having DLC available when you buy the game and then adding a charge to the consumer who buys it second hand, I think that’s just naturally the way it’s going to have to go to deal with those kind of situations,” Stewart said. “At the end of the day we take huge risks and we invest ten of millions of dollars in making a game and marketing a game and to think, stock turn-wise, we could sell one but four people could play it, I just think that it’s something that we have to manage very carefully.”
As I said when EA Sports announced its Online Pass last week, they are certainly correct that something needs to be done with the used games market growing the way it is. Thankfully, the bigwigs seem to be addressing the issue without losing their heads, which means we can maybe arrive at a solution without any large corporations taking down other large corporations. But it’s still early, so we’ll see.

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We can add Crystal Dynamics global brand director Karl Stewart to the list of folks in the games industry who don’t really like that you buy used games. Crystal Dynamics is best known for developing the Tomb Raider series.

“I think the model as we see it right now is a frail one. Having the used market is not beneficial to any of us,” Stewart told CVG. He also referenced EA’s Project Ten Dollar as being the kind of model that will work.

“Some of the plays that have been made more recently about having DLC available when you buy the game and then adding a charge to the consumer who buys it second hand, I think that’s just naturally the way it’s going to have to go to deal with those kind of situations,” Stewart said. “At the end of the day we take huge risks and we invest ten of millions of dollars in making a game and marketing a game and to think, stock turn-wise, we could sell one but four people could play it, I just think that it’s something that we have to manage very carefully.”

As I said when EA Sports announced its Online Pass last week, they are certainly correct that something needs to be done with the used games market growing the way it is. Thankfully, the bigwigs seem to be addressing the issue without losing their heads, which means we can maybe arrive at a solution without any large corporations taking down other large corporations. But it’s still early, so we’ll see.

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1 Comment on NEWSFLASH: Yet Another Developer Doesn't Like Used Games Market

Ron Whitaker

On May 19, 2010 at 1:49 pm

I agree with Phil in that the EA model is what we’re going to see from all publishers in the future. I also think that publishers and developers will find a way to get their cut of used games, most likely by discounting older games that are being sold digitally.

However, I wouldn’t look for GameStop or any other used game store to be going out of business in the near future. That market is as lucrative right now as it ever has been.