Southern Victory World war 2 -1 reply

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Emperor Norton I

Nothing is real, Everything is

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20th July 2006

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#1 12 years ago

I announce the start of a mod based on the Southern Victory book Series (by Harry Turtledove) in which the South won the civil war and continued to ww2 but i need help (PS i also need help w/ a Bf1942 Version & if you would like to help post [COLOR="Red"]here[/COLOR] http://forums.filefront.com/showthread.php?t=266281:deal: and Southern Victory WWI for Bf1942 [COLOR="Red"]here [/COLOR]http://forums.filefront.com/showthread.php?t=266233) Heres some info on the Southern Victory WW2 CSAmap.jpg([COLOR=red]Confederacy after WWI[/COLOR]) In the 1930s The southern economy is a wreck after the loss of the Great War and the Stock market Crash. These, along with the hatred of Blacks after the Black Socialist rebellion from 1915-1916 gave rise to fascist organizations in the Confederacy,as in Britain and France.The Freedom Party took control in 1934 and began a genocide of southern blacks. In this world, the CSA is similar to Nazi Germany, complete with a totalitarian leader, President Jake Featherston (1934-), and his Freedom Party. The USA is the Western Allies and the USSR combined, being led by Socialist President Al Smith (1937-42) and then his vice president, Charles La Follette (1942-).

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The Following is from wikipedia Date:1941 - ?Location:Worldwide Result:Unknown Casus belli:French invasion of Alsace-Lorraine Combatants Great Britain France Russian Empire Japan Confederate States Empire of Mexico Mormon Rebels Canadian Rebels [COLOR=red]Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Ireland Poland Ukraine Quebec United States Black Guerillas[/COLOR] Operation Blackbeard (Ohio 1941) The outbreak of the War in North America took many Americans by surprise, being caught offguard by bombing attacks over major cities without even knowing hostilities had broken out. The U.S. General Staff had been expecting war, but was also caught offguard by the focal-point of the Confederacy's offensive: Ohio, and not Maryland-eastern Pennsylvania as in the last war. After opening the war with bombing raids and artillery barrages, the C.S. Army of Kentucky crossed the Ohio River into the state of Ohio, with General George Patton's barrel forces in the lead. Blackbeard was born of the mind of Lieutenant General Nathan Bedford Forrest III, Chief of the Confederate General Staff and main advisor to Jake Featherston. Knowing that a long war of attrition could only be won in the end by the numerically and industrially superior USA, Forrest devised a plan to knock the USA out of the war as soon as possible by the easiest and shortest route: Ohio. The bulk of the U.S. Army was positioned in Northern Virginia in front of Washington, and the force left to defend the Midwest was considered secondary to the planners in the U.S. military. Forrest was aware of that, and made plans to break through the thin lines along the Ohio River and drive north to the Great Lakes as soon as possible, effectively cutting the USA in half. Thus the Confederate Army's objective was to reach Lake Erie as it launched its surprise attack on June 22, 1941. Southern Ohio Expecting a repeat of the 1914-17 conflict with its trench systems and set-piece engagements, the U.S. army under Brig. General Abner Dowling had set up lines of defense across southern Ohio, aiming to keep the CSA from Columbus and beyond. Using modern methods (Blitzkrieg in our world), Patton's armor smashed through the lines and moved on, leaving the pockets of resistance to be mopped up by the second and third-wave infantry. The C.S. air force controlled the skies, bombing airfields and roads at will, tying down the U.S. fighters and creating havoc on the roads by strafing columns of refugees. The Mule dive-bomber was a particularly feared weapon, as it screamed (using wind-powered sirens, much like the Ju-87 Stuka) down on its foes like a demon. In addition to dive-bombers and barrel attacks, the C.S. forces employed modern chemical weapons on soldiers and civilians alike, causing thousands of casualties. In two weeks, the Army of Kentucky breached the three defense lines set up by Dowling, capturing Cincinnati and Chillicothe, and by early July had reached the outskirts of the state capital. Battle of Columbus The U.S. Army fought the C.S. Army foot for foot near Columbus, Ohio, and in suburbs such as Grove City and West Jefferson, destroying much of the area and displacing thousands of civilians, who moved north away from the fighting. Fighting in the city itself didn't do as much damage, although the State Capitol took several direct hits by Mules (by now having earned the nickname of 'Asskickers' by soldiers on both sides), but remained standing, being used by artillery spotters for Confederate movements. To the west of Columbus, Patton's armor chased the U.S. forces out of their positions along the Big Darby river and its tributaries. In a week of fighting, the Confederates pushed on, leaving the several trapped U.S. divisions inside the capital of Ohio to wither until they surrendered. The Drive to Lake Erie Even before Columbus had fallen, General Patton had pushed on, toward the Great Lakes and Blackbeard's objective of carving a corridor through the narrowest part of the United States. Barrels tore U.S. positions apart, Mules and Hound Dog fighters shot up anything that moved on the roads, and Confederate spies with near-perfect Yankee accents caused confusion behind the lines. General Dowling and his barrel commander, Colonel Irving Morrell, set up a last line of defense anchored between Findlay and Norwalk. The Confederates hit both towns with a heavy assault in late July, and rolled up the U.S. defenders to either side of the corridor as it snaked its way toward Lake Erie. In the southeast part of the state, Confederate forces halted local counterattacks aimed at the base of the salient. Fall of Sandusky The Army of Kentucky reached Lake Erie at the seaside town of Sandusky, about halfway between the cities of Cleveland and Toledo. Some of the worst fighting of the Ohio campaign was waged in the street fighting that tore the town apart, especially in the battle for the crayon factory. Nevertheless, the city fell after several days of battle, and Confederate guns now looked out over Lake Erie. With the United States cut in half from the Ohio River to Lake Erie, many people on both sides figured the war would be ending soon. Jake Featherston thought so as he made his Peace Broadcast in early August, but his offer, much to everyone's surprise, was rebuffed by Al Smith. No matter whose soldiers occupied Ohio, according to Smith, the war would be fought to a finish. Morrell's Counter-attack The Confederate Corridor had separated several U.S. formations, causing some to find themselves west of the salient and others to the east. The stronger forces were all on the east side, and under Irving Morrell's command gathered themselves together for a strong counter-offensive aimed at driving west toward Columbus or Dayton. Featherston and his Intelligence chief, Brig. General Clarence Potter, had figured out the U.S. intentions, and ordered the several Confederate agents and sympathizers in the area to sabotage the area's roads and bridges. When Morrell struck in mid-August, in Monroe County, he found his force constantly held up by wrecked bridges, leading to his calling off the attack after several days. The first U.S. response to the fall of Ohio got nowhere, and the U.S. War Department began shifting forces on the east side of the salient to the build-up in Maryland and Northern Virginia, while U.S. forces on the west side were dispatched to the new front opening up in Utah. As he had proved himself an annoyance to the officers of the General Staff, Morrell himself was relegated to the now-secondary Ohio front, and his valuable skills in armor warfare ignored. Northern Virginia 1941-42 After the debacle of the Ohio campaign, the U.S. Congress set up a new board to oversee the war effort: the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War. The first soldier to come up under its scrutiny was Abner Dowling, the officer in charge of defending Ohio. After a brief tongue-lashing, the general was sent to the War Department to await further orders. U.S. forces were being shifted to the Northern Virginia front for an attack on Richmond, with no attempt being made to disguise the U.S. intentions or plans. General Daniel MacArthur was put forward by the Joint Committee to head the attack, which would have to take place against several heavily-fortified Confederate positions along several river lines. MacArthur was confident about his chances against the Confederates, taking no account of their tenacity and will to win into his plans, and instead assumed that U.S. soldiers would be marching into Richmond on a very short basis. This hubris was to cost the USA dearly as the offensive opened in late October after several delays. The Rappahannock and Rapidan MacArthur launched his attack over the Rappahannock river to the west of Fredericksburg. Entrenched Confederate guns and barrels cost his force several thousand casualties, but by nightfall the USA had a bridgehead on the south bank. The Americans battled their way across trench systems toward the Rapidan, where they were stopped by a fierce defense. The USA had intended to hit the CSA with a lightning strike of the sort that the Confederacy had used in Ohio, but was instead reduced to using Great War methods of offense, which was also the product of MacArthur's own lack of imagination and innovation. After several days of further attacking, a U.S. force crossed the Rapidan river and established a bridgehead in a tangle of terrain and forest called The Wilderness. Patton's Counterattack In their drive to the south, the U.S. army had exposed their right flank as it brushed against the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains. First Corps, under the command of Abner Dowling, was the unit in charge of watching the flank. Dowling made sure to watch the mountains for any sign, but MacArthur's orders were to advance south. Under Featherston's watch, General George Patton struck First Corps in a lightning counterattack and pushed the USA back several miles. Although Dowling recovered the situation and held off Patton from reaching the USA's rear, MacArthur was forced to call off the attack in The Wilderness, which was holding up the U.S. bridgehead there. Fredericksburg While both sides of the line settled down for winter quarters, their respective high commands made plans for renewed assaults in the spring. The Confederate General Staff quietly began removing veteran units away from Northern Virginia and sending them northwest to Ohio for the renewal of their assault. General MacArthur also spent his winter making plans. Initially, he wanted to land a force on the Virginia Peninsula and march on Richmond from the east, ala George McClellan in 1862, even securing support from the U.S. Navy's Rear Admiral William Halsey. The U.S. General Staff, informed by Dowling that MacArthur had attempted to take a division from Dowling's First Corps to go into the landing force, quietly ordered him to scuttle the plan. Undaunted and seemingly oblivious to being thwarted by the War Department, MacArthur began looking for new places to break through. After Dowling's intelligence reports inform him of the Confederates' clandestine troop withdrawals, MacArthur became confident that the CSA's line at the Rappahannock town of Fredericksburg, Virginia, was the perfect place to launch his spring offensive. Unfortunately for MacArthur and for the thousands of U.S. soldiers preparing for the assault, Jake Featherston had also come across Fredericksburg as a likely flashpoint for a major engagement. Visiting the spot where he had spent the last hours of the Great War at Marye's Heights, which overlooks the town, Featherston wanted to draw the U.S. forces into the open fields under the Heights, which would be covered by dug-in machine-guns and artillery. MacArthur began his attack by sending in engineers to build pontoon bridges across the Rappahannock under artillery fire. The engineers were slaughtered, as were several regiments of soldiers waiting to cross from the far bank. After a lull in the fighting, during which reinforcements were brought forward on both sides of the river, the USA attacked again, this time managing to secure a bridgehead inside Fredericksburg. Once the U.S. force began advancing south, Confederate guns opened up again and pinned the force down, creating thousands of casualties. Several days later, MacArthur ordered the remaining troops to fall back across the river, never having advanced outside the town itself toward Marye's Heights. MacArthur and several U.S. officers were criticized in the press and before the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War. However, the senseless battle became almost instantly forgotten in the wake of the Confederate drive to Pittsburgh, which began not long after the Battle of Fredericksburg ended. Coal-Scuttle (Pennsylvania 1942-43) The genesis for Operation Coal-scuttle (so named because the objective of Pittsburgh lay in the middle of the USA's heavy industrial area) lay in the aftermath of Operation Blackbeard, when Confederate forces secured a corridor through the middle of the United States in the hope that a USA carved in two would sue for peace. Al Smith refused to negotiate with Featherston, and launched the USA's first great counter-offensive in Northern Virginia--which Featherston and Forrest had been preparing for. As soon as it was apparent that the U.S. Army was not going to take Richmond anytime soon, the C.S. leadership began making plans to knock the United States of America out of the war--for good. Almost immediately following the success of Blackbeard, Featherston figured that the USA's steel-producing capability would be the last thing holding that country up. Once the steel-centers fell into Confederate hands, Featherston reasoned, the USA would have to sue for peace, since the country was still cut in half and the steel needed to make barrels and planes would be in enemy hands. While General MacArthur kept himself and the USA busy in Northern Virginia, the Confederate Army began moving veteran units out of Virginia and back into Ohio. As they had done in 1941, the Confederates in their 1942 offensive would employ modern tactics (or Blitzkrieg in our universe) in their push to Pittsburgh, but this time adding a special force of Confederate soldiers in U.S. uniforms with U.S. accents sowing confusion behind the lines. On the diplomatic front, Featherston secured from the Emperor Francisco Jose three Mexican divisions to guard the flanks of the C.S. advance. The Confederate President had to put "pressure" on the Mexican Emperor to get his divisions, but rewarded his counterpart by allowing Mexican immigrants to pour into the CSA and take over the jobs formerly belonging to the country's blacks. Featherston was gambling all on this great offensive. U.S. Intelligence had been figuring out that the Confederates were moving forces somewhere, but no one was expecting an attack in northeastern Ohio in late June 1942 when the Confederates burst from Sandusky and Columbus and launched their great drive to the east. (This whole campaign, with the enemy's economic center as a target of the leader's megalomania, is an analog to Hitler's Operation Blue of the summer of 1942, which culminated in the Battle of Stalingrad). Battle of Cleveland Confederate forces deployed along the shore of Lake Erie reached the outskirts of Cleveland on the first day of Coal-scuttle, catching the U.S. soldiers on the west side by surprise before they could react to the new offensive. Scattered U.S. units were overwhelmed, and the Confederates crossed the Cuyahoga River while meeting minimal resistance, which was bombed into submission by massed Mule formations, allowing the C.S. forces to advance past the Flats and fan out into downtown Cleveland. Within a week of Coal-scuttle's start, the biggest city on the way to Pittsburgh had fallen. Drive to the East The Confederate Army under George Patton (who had returned to Ohio from the Virginia front) pushed to the east even while the battle for Cleveland raged. With the majority of the prime U.S. units still in Northern Virginia under MacArthur's command, the U.S Army of Ohio under Br. General Irving Morrell withdrew to the Pennsylvania border region, while supplying the garrisons of Akron, Canton, and Youngstown. Morrell led small-scale counterattacks that halted and forceed back some C.S. units, but failed to prevent Patton from crossing into Pennsylvania. By that time, it was obvious that Pittsburgh was Featherston's ultimate objective, and Morrell ordered his command to prepare for the defense of the region. Meanwhile, the Confederate northern force that had seized Cleveland had reached the small town of Beaver, Pennsylvania before halting. The special unit of Confederate soldiers with U.S. uniforms and accents had been deployed at the front in Beaver and proceeded to wreak havoc behind the U.S. lines, causing confusion and terror amongst the green U.S. soldiers, civilians and refugees from Ohio. Featherston and Forrest had originally planned to surround Pittsburgh and incapacitate the USA's steel industry with a siege, but several blunt counterattacks from Morrell had forced Patton to redirect his offensive into the city itself. Battle of Pittsburgh Patton unleashed his armor into the city of Pittsburgh, hoping to reach the Allegheny River and the downtown area before the USA could put up a proper defense. In every battle before Pittsburgh, Patton had avoided sending barrels into cities, which made horrible conditions for barrel warfare. Not wishing to give up the USA's steel center without a fight, Morrell turned every inch of the city into a fortress. U.S. and C.S. soldiers and barrels fought over every block and sector of the outer neighborhoods of Pittsburgh, actions that caused thousands of casualties for both sides. Inch by inch, the Confederates pressed toward the city center at the junction of the Allegheny, Ohio, and Monongahela rivers. After several weeks of brutal urban fighting, Forrest was convinced that the objectives of Operation Coal-scuttle had been met: the industries in and around Pittsburgh had been wrecked, while several U.S. divisions had been mauled. He made his presentation to Featherston, who was following the battle from his large Presidential-Bunker underneath Shockoe Hill (he did pay a visit to the Pennsylvania front while Patton was making his approach to Pittsburgh), but was sucked into a debate with Featherston, who wanted to occupy the area as well as wreck it, if for nothing more than to prove to the United States that he could win any battle on any site he chose. Featherston flew into a rage when Forrest made a comparison to the Great War, (the Confederate President, who was only a sergeant in that conflict, thought of himself as a better strategist than Forrest, who had matured after the Great War had ended), kicking the Confederate Army Chief of Staff out. Pittsburgh, Featherston declared, would fall--at all costs. On the U.S. side, Morrell had been bugging the War Department for weeks on end, even prompting its trouble-shooter Br. General John Abell to make a personal visit. In the middle of October, as the Confederacy was on the verge of reaching the Allegheny, Morrell finally got leeway and reinforcements to fight the battle the way he thought it should be fought. His Intelligence reports indicated weak flanks along both sides of the Confederate salient in Pennsylvania, manned by the three Mexican divisions that Featherston had taken from Francisco Jose. The Mexicans had no armor or machine guns, and weak artillery, which made soft targets for the great counter-offensive Morrell was planning to unleash. By mid-November, he was ready--but for a snowstorm that he needed to launch his attack during. It came three days after the date his attack had originally been scheduled to take place. Morrell led the pincer force from the north while another U.S. force pushed from West Virginia. The Mexican divisions that had been guarding the flanks to the Confederate army in Pittsburgh were annihilated. In a week, the U.S. pincers met at the small Ohio town of Lafayette, just south of Canton. The Confederates in Pittsburgh were now trapped in a pocket. The Sideshows In addition to the Pittsburgh Counteroffensive, the USA launched several sideshow attacks all along the American-Confederate border to draw C.S. reinforcements from the Midwest and stretch the frontier thin. In Virginia, MacArthur engaged the Army of Northern Virginia in several local battles; in Arkansas another U.S. force pushed south from Missouri. Arms shipments to black rebels in the Deep South increased, but only by a little bit; even with people such as Flora Blackford bringing the Black Holocaust to the attention of the world, public opinion continued to show little support for the blacks' cause. The main sideshow event took place in western Texas (formerly the U.S. state of Houston between July 4, 1918-January 7, 1941). In November 1942, Major General Abner Dowling found himself redeployed to Clovis, New Mexico, in order to spearhead a diversionary attack into the Confederate periphery and forestall any enemy ambitions. Although sceptical of the worth of the attack other than to take the attention away from Pittsburgh, Dowling's Eleventh Army was forty miles inside Texas by mid-month, advancing along Confederate Highway 84 via Sudan and Amherst towards Lubbock - a similar penetration to that accomplished in the Great War. As yet unbeknown to the U.S. forces, just one hundred miles further to the south-east was Camp Determination, whose guards were eyeing the U.S. push with some nervousness, and preparing to blow up the camp's installations if necessary. Operation Rosebud Nathan Bedford Forrest III had returned to Jake Featherston's office after the Confederates in Pittsburgh were surrounded and re-made his point about withdrawing, this time adding that Patton needed to do so before his barrels and trucks ran out of fuel. The President overruled him with his point that Confederate air force transports could make an air-bridge to Pittsburgh and keep Patton supplied to continue wrecking the city, ignoring the simple fact that there were not enough transports to keep an entire army supplied. In the meantime, enough spare Confederate forces could be scraped up and mount a counterattack to break through and relieve Patton. Where the President could come up with the number needed to make the attack possible, Forrest didn't know. Nevertheless, Confederate Army supply and clerk soldiers were drafted into infantry formations and rushed into an attack in mid-December, at one point nearly making it to within twenty miles of Patton's lines. Irving Morrell had figured that the CSA would attempt such a move. Just when the Confederates were about to relieve Pittsburgh, using up the last of their reserves, he ordered a collection of U.S. units in northwestern Ohio and Indiana to strike the Confederate Corridor on its west side: the operation being named "Rosebud." The Confederate push to relieve Pittsburgh was stopped dead, as Forrest was forced to move units back and forth across the Corridor to contain the U.S. attack in the west. With no spare C.S. Army units anywhere in the CSA, the Confederate Army was stretched extremely thin. Jake Featherston thought differently. He ordered the Mexican Emperor (through his Secretary of State, George Herbert Walker) to hand over another five divisions, although this time they were to replace Confederate Army divisions fighting black rebels in the Deep South. For the same purpose, Featherston ordered his Attorney General, Ferdinand Koenig, to increase the "population reductions" at Camp Determination (which was being threatened by Dowling's Eleventh Army) and elsewhere, annihilating the CSA's black population and releasing precious C.S. Army and Freedom Party guard formations for service at the front. However, these extra Army forces relieved by the Mexicans arrived too late to save the Pittsburgh Pocket. The Crushing of the Pittsburgh Pocket The Confederate Army in Pittsburgh was slowly destroyed in winter actions up to the end of January 1943. With the air-bridge failing and Irving Morrell's Rosebud attack preventing rescue from the outside, Patton's soldiers started to fall apart--even being forced to resort to stealing U.S. cigarettes (universally considered to be inferior to Southern tobacco) and U.S. bolt-action rifles. One by one, the CSA's positions collapsed; Jake Featherston personally ordered General Patton to board the last transport plane out of the Pocket before the airfield was captured. On February 2, 1943, the remaining C.S. soldiers surrendered the last holdout positions and went into captivity. From this point in the Second World War, the United States had the initiative. Utah Road to War The State of Utah had been placed under Army occupation for twenty years, from the Great War to the Smith Administration. As a measure of goodwill and conciliation, Al Smith's first act as president in February, 1937, was to release Utah from martial law. In the gubernatorial and congressional elections that followed almost immediately, the Church of Jesus Christ and the Latter Day Saints (known as the LDS Church or the Mormons) took control of the apparatus of government. Moderate Heber Young counseled a return to normalcy in Utah's relations with the rest of the Union, but hardliners in the U.S. Congress and elsewhere constantly fulminated about U.S. policies toward the Mormon Church. With the relations between the USA and the CSA worsening, Mormon agents made contact with Confederate government officials and Freedom Party supporters and received promises of support in the event of a general war between the Union and the Confederacy, the expectation baing that the Mormons would rise up and hamper the USA's war effort. Jake Featherston unleashed the Confederate Army into the USA on June 22, 1941. As the U.S. Army reeled backward in disarray in the face of the Confederate onslaught in Ohio, Governor Young publicly warned the Smith Administration that transportation of U.S. military goods and personnel across the Transcontinental Railroad in Utah would not be tolerated. Privately, a Mormon agent contacted Congresswoman Flora Hamburger Blackford (S-NY) and asked her to convince President Smith to let Utah off. Al Smith reacted strongly against these Mormon ultimatums, which, along with the fall of Columbus in the middle of July, compelled the Morman hardliners to take action. They launched their coup, seized power in Salt Lake City, and assassinated several moderates and Gentiles. Heber Young was forced to flee into Colorado along with his entourage as the hardliners renamed Utah the “Nation of Deseret” and declared war on the United States. Battle of Provo The Mormons blew up the Transcontinental Railroad line running through the state, seized federal installations and weapons compounds, and occupied the major towns and cities, killing or dispersing the non-conformists. Armed with Confederate weapons and funds, Mormon soldiers mined the roads and regions around the cities, and fortified strong points guarding access into the populated areas. They were prepared when, in the aftermath of the CSA’s Operation Blackbeard in Ohio, U.S. Army units to the west of the Confederate Corridor were shipped west to deal with the uprising. Upon entering Utah from Colorado, the U.S. Army disembarked from the trains and set up base camp, being attacked almost immediately by makeshift Mormon bombers. Pushing west, the Americans hit a stone wall in Provo, being forced to fight street by street into the center of town under constant attacks by Mormon soldiers and civilian insurgents armed with Featherston Fizzes (Molotov cocktails) and homemade grenades. Confederate anti-barrel mines destroyed entire columns of Great War-vintage barrels. (All the available modern armor was facing the Confederacy in the East.) Meanwhile, Spigot mortars rained down hard on the infantry. The fighting raged well into the winter and spring of 1942, when the USA finally cleared the city of remaining insurgents. When the fighting petered out in the spring of 1942, President Charles La Follette (Al Smith was killed in a bombing raid in February, 1942) sent out peace feelers to the LDS Church on a basis of a status quo ante bellum. Represented by Hyrum Rush, the Mormon hardliners rejected La Follette’s offer and pressed for independence, which in turn was rejected by the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War and Secretary of the Interior Harry Hopkins. The Utah War would continue. The Insurgency Spreads Almost as soon as Hyrum Rush was back in Mormon-held territory, car bombings took place all over the USA, from the State House in Boston to Wall Street and Times Square in New York City to the Congress hall in Philadelphia, and in other places as well. On the front lines, U.S. soldiers listened to Confederate Connie--the C.S. propaganda voice aimed at lowering U.S. morale (similar to Tokyo Rose and Lord Haw-Haw in the Axis)--cheer on the Mormons and reminded the USA about how their funding Red black uprisings in the CSA caused similar havoc. Then Mormon "people bombs" (suicide bombers) started targeting urban centers and mass transit networks as well as soldiers in Utah. Unlike the car bombs, the Confederacy's radio and news networks acted as if the people bombs never happened, being ordered to do so by Jake Featherston, who feared the news would give his own black rebels ideas he would rather not have. Nevertheless, for all of Saul Goldman's attempts to suppress news of the people bombs from the C.S. people, a black people bomb destroyed a white restaurant in Jackson, Mississippi in October 1942, prompting Featherston to order the entire black population of the city to be sent to an extermination camp (more on the Confederate Population Reduction Program below). The Atlantic Campaign The naval war in the Atlantic (the American and German navies battling their Confederate, British, and French counterparts) saw early victories for the Entente before settling into a stalemate. The US carrier Remembrance fired the opening shots of the Atlantic campaign when its aircraft bombed Charleston in response to the Confederacy's surprise attack on Philadelphia. Shortly thereafter, the British carrier Ark Royal lured the Remembrance and Sandwich Islands away from American-controlled Bermuda, allowing a joint Anglo-CS taskforce to capture the strategically-placed island. The Confederate reduction of the US-ruled Bahamas began soon afterwards. The islands were conquered by the end of autumn. Thereafter, the naval war settled down into a long period of isolated duels between Entente and Central Powers vessels. The US Navy was occupied with coastal raids upon the Confederacy and preventing the shipment of arms by British vessels to Canadian rebels in Newfoundland. In late 1942, a major sea battle was fought between the Royal Navy and German High Seas Fleet. Confusion existed in North America over which side was victorious. The BBC claimed British victory, German Imperial Wireless denied it but did not counterclaim German victory. Future events (a sudden increase in German ships fuelling in US ports, for example) may tell which side won, or if it ended in a draw. The Pacific Campaign Japan bided its time during the first weeks of the war, allowing the Confederate army to deal the US a major blow before Tokyo committed its forces against America. As in the Pacific War ten years earlier, Japan's objective was control of the Sandwich Islands. Early skirmishing was followed by triumph for Japan when America's sole carrier in the Pacific, the Remembrance, was sunk in December, 1941, while protecting Midway Island. Though Japan also lost one carrier and suffered damage to another, the island fell to the Japanese, leaving them in a position to further threaten the Sandwich Islands. 1942 began with the same long calm that had characterised most of the previous year. With only one Japanese carrier operational near Midway, neither side was capable of offensive moves, until the newly-built escort carriers Trenton and Chapultepec reached Pearl Harbor. In the second Battle of Midway, planes from the Trenton sank Japan's only carrier near Midway while suffering little damage herself. As of early 1943, the Pacific remained mired in stalemate. Occupied Canada Shortly before the outbreak of war, the US Army reassigned its occupation forces to postings further south. Their posts were manned by Quebecois conscripts, whose French language and customs only infuriated the English-speaking Canadians. Canada, nonetheless, remained quiet throughout the first twelve months of the war. Confederate attempts to provoke a rising were met with scorn; the Canadians saw them as tyrants in the same vein as the Americans. Eventually, the CS government persuaded Winston Churchill to add British weight to their efforts, and soon Entente agents met with more success. The Canadian revolt erupted in the Autumn of 1942, just as the Confederate Army of Kentucky was beginning its offensive into Pennsylvania. The Quebecois garrisons proved unable to resist many of the Canadian forces, and by the end of the year Winnipeg was in rebel hands. The US Army had to divert critical resources from Utah and the eastern fronts; accordingly Philadelphia pressured Quebec City to conscript more of its youth for service in Canada. Europe (Note: some of the following is informed speculation, as Turtledove provides very few hard facts about events outside North America) Opening Moves (1941) The war in Europe kicked off a few weeks earlier than the North American conflict. The ascension of Kaiser Friedrich Wilhelm V following Wilhelm II's death prompted demands from Action Francaise for the return of Alsace-Lorraine. Friedrich's refusal led to a new round of fighting between the Entente and the German bloc. France and Britain were the first to declare war upon Germany. French tanks and infantry began the liberation / conquest of Alsace-Lorraine (posssibly the Rhineland too because of its placement between the Alsace-Lorraine region and occupied Belgium) while the RAF's bombers started pounding on north German cities. Tsar Michael of Russia recalled his ambassadors from Berlin, Vienna, and Constantinople, joining his western allies in the war shortly afterwards. Events in western Europe during the summer and autumn of 1941 seemed to favour the Entente powers. French forces soon recovered the objectives in Alsace-Lorraine and stood upon the Rhine. The Anglo-French thrust through the Low Countries met with enormous success; the Belgians welcomed the Entente soldiers as liberators, while the more pro-German Dutch were unable to resist the occupation of Holland. Before long, Entente forces were driving into the North German Plain. Pro-American Ireland was also conquered by British forces during this time. But already the Entente's advance seemed to be slowing down. Hamburg was threatened but did not fall, ensuring that the German High Seas Fleet remained a viable force. Further south, France was unable to force a crossing of the Rhine, as the Germans swiftly rallyed to repel the invaders. Winston Churchill's invasion of Norway was a bloody fiasco; whether he was after Norway's strategic location and ports or access to Swedish iron ore, all Churchill succeeded in doing was driving that nation into Germany's camp. Though Bulgaria toyed with the idea of deserting Germany, the presence of German ally Turkey on her southern border eventually persuaded the Bulgarians to remain on the Kaiser's side. Russia was able to drive Austro-German forces from most of the Ukraine, albeit thanks to Ukrainian support for their Russian liberators. Elsewhere however Russia's manpower swarming tactics, unchanged since the Great War, resulted in heavy losses to German panzers and '88' flak guns for no appreciable gains. Stalemate (1941-43) By the end of 1941 it was clear that although the Central Powers had suffered enormous blows, the Entente had failed to drive either Germany or Austria-Hungary from the war. By the winter of 1941-42 Germany was strong enough to launch counter-attacks against Britain outside Hamburg, and throw Austro-German forces against the Russians in the east. Throughout 1942 the lines remained more or less stable. Anglo-French soldiers fought hard to retain the territory they had taken during the previous year, but no real gains seem to have been made by either side. Tsarist armies may have fared better, as Confederate newspapers reported on Russian advances toward Warsaw in German-ally Poland. Partisans proved to be a sizable problem for all sides. Britain contended with Irish rebels and the Tsar fought Jewish, Finnish, Chechen, and Azerbaijani partisans. For its part, Austria-Hungary battled Serbs, Bosnians, and Romanians, amongst others. The Ukraine was a hornet's nest of Russian, German, and nationalist factions fighting fierce guerilla warfare against each other. Each major alliance funded certain groups. No information exists concerning Ottoman Turkey or Italy; however, since Russia recalled its ambassador to Constantinople, it seems that there was at least a break in diplomatic relations between both Russia and the Ottoman Empire. The Confederate Holocaust The Black Rebellion of the 1930s Negroes fought back against the oppressive Freedom Party regime under President Jake Featherston. Featherston often provoked them into fighting the Confederate army, and used this as an excuse to get U.S. president Herbert Hoover (president from 1933-1937) to let the Freedom Party build up the Confederate Army. The black rebellions in the 30's failed miserably, and those who weren't killed by the C.S. Army were taken away to the concentration camps to be murdered there. In retrospect, these rebellions only cemented Freedom Party control of the South and let Featherston unleash his war machine on the world in 1941. From Discrimination to Deportation (1934-1941) For decades the black population of the CSA languished under a system of strict racial control, similar to South Africa's Apartheid program, where blacks were considered to be residents of the South, but not citizens like the whites. The blacks would take the work that not even the bottom rung of white society would do (the so called "po' buckra" or "white trash"), such as plantation work. Blacks also got more severe sentences for crime compared to a white individual who committed the same crime. Additionally, blacks couldn't leave their respective towns, parishes, or counties without having their passbook auhtorized by the state government. To travel from Jackson to Vicksburg, Mississippi, for instance, would require at least two-weeks for approval from the state. For a while after the First World War the system was let up, but under increasing Freedom control of the halls of power in the late 1920s and early 30s strict control was re-enacted. After Jake Featherston became president in early 1934, there was nothing to prevent the whites from turning on their black brethren now that the highest law in the land endorsed it. And endorse it the Freedom Party did; several times in 1934 race riots destroyed the black districts of several Confederate cities. The Confederate government, which was slowly being interconnected with the Freedom Party during the Freedomization of the mid-1930s, passed it off as a simple "internal affair." The blacks became more militarized, and, armed with Red rhetoric and weapons that had been hidden since 1916, prepared to hit back at their white oppressors. The day after Election Day in the midterm elections of 1935 (which were clearly rigged by the Freedom Party, ensuring complete Freedom domination of the state legislatures, which picked the national Senators) the blacks struck at the whites. While not as racially-charged as 1915, the rebellion still caused alarm in the white population. And some Confederates took advantage of the new revolt; Featherston asked his U.S. counterpart, Herbert Hoover to allow him to increase the C.S. Army to a size larger than that allowed by the 1917 Armistice. Hoover agreed, thinking it was going to be used for internal policing only. At that point Featherston planned to his re-armament and conscription. The Freedom Party had built several concentration camps in 1934 to house people who might cause trouble for the Freedom regime, like Radical Liberal leaders and Whig politicians. Featherston put the captured black rebels in these camps, and started arresting any black man for the flimsiest pieces of evidence. He also blamed the USA for the rebellions, and even went as far as to place U.S. weapons in the hands of dead blacks and photograph them for "evidence." By 1940-41, the white "politicals" had been mostly murdered and their slots taken by black men. The new problem was that there was too many black men in these camps, and not much being done to properly take care of them. The Population Reductions Begin (1941-1942) The world began dissolving into a state of war in 1941 as Featherston and his Attorney General, Ferdinand Koenig, made the decision to destroy the black race in North America. With the eyes of the world turned toward the developing wars in Europe and Ohio, the commandants of several concentration camps in Louisiana began "population reductions"; i.e.: the murder of thousands of prisoners in order to make room for a replacement batch, which in turn would have their "populations reduced." (This became a slang term that popped into mainstream Confederate vocabulary.) Throughout 1941, men like Jefferson Davis Pinkard and Mercer Scott at Camp Dependable, and others at other places, led groups of a couple thousand blacks to the bayou or woods and forced them to dig graves, then shot them with submachine gun fire. The strain of mass executions took their toll on the Freedom Party guards carrying out the death sentences, and several committed suicide. In one such suicide, guard Chick Blades killed himself with carbon monoxide from his automobile exhaust. This gave Pinkard the idea of execution by gas chamber. He configured a truck to pump its carbon monoxide into the transport area, sealed off to be a mobile gas chamber, killing everyone inside. Featherston and Koenig were pleased by this more efficient way of murder, and took several units of trucks from the Army for this purpose. They also ordered architects and scientists to develop a blueprint for the greatest prison camp ever built, which would open up for business on an empty stretch of prairie in western Texas. Hundreds of "transport trucks" were requisitioned for use there, while whole cities' worth of prisoners would be brought in by a rail spur. And "cities' worth" was exactly the idea for the camp. The Freedom Party was extending the black genocide to women and children. Camp Determination (1942-) Camp Determination is a concentration camp for blacks built in the Confederate state of Texas, and headed by Camp Commandment and loyal Freedom Party man Jefferson Pinkard. It is built in a secluded area, and in its walls lie murder, torture, and starvation for Negroes. In what the fascist government of the CSA calls "population reductions," Negroes are either killed in gas chambers, gassed to death in trucks, or occasionally shot to death. By 1943, the U.S. Army under General Abner Dowling was closing in on Camp Determination. Confederate Presidents The President is the executive officer in the Confederate States. Since 1867, the President has been elected every six years and sworn in March 4 of the following year. Originally, the Confederate Constitution limited presidents to one term in office. Burton Mitchel served for almost two full terms because he succeded Wade Hampton V after Hampton's assassination. During Jake Featherston's term in office, a constitutional amendment passed allowing reelection, and Featherston was easily reelected. Jefferson Davis 1861-1868 Robert E. Lee 1868-1874 (not confirmed in the books) 1874-1880 James Longstreet 1880-1886 Thomas Jackson 1886-1892 (not confirmed in the books) 1892-1898 1898-1904 1904-1910 Woodrow Wilson 1910-1916 Gabriel Semmes 1916-1922 Wade Hampton V 1922 Burton Mitchel 1922-1934 Jake Featherston 1934- US Presidents Abraham Lincoln 1861-1865 Republican Horatio Seymour 1865-1869 Democrat 1869-1873 Democrat 1873-1877 Democrat Samuel J. Tilden 1877-1881 Democrat James G. Blaine 1881-1885 Republican 1885-1889 Democrat Alfred Thayer Mahan 1889-1897 Democrat Thomas Brackett Reed 1897-1901 Democrat 1901-1905 Democrat 1905-1909 Democrat 1909-1913 Democrat Theodore Roosevelt 1913-1921 Democrat Upton Sinclair 1921-1929 Socialist Hosea Blackford 1929-1933 Socialist Herbert Hoover 1933-1937 Democrat Al Smith 1937-1942 Socialist Charles La Follette 1942- Socialist Due to the divergence betwen OTL and Southern Victory some terms are not the same in our world. Here is a list of some of them. (Southern Victory = OTL term)

  • [COLOR=black]Barrel[/COLOR][COLOR=black] = tank [/COLOR]
  • [COLOR=black]Chosen = Korea [/COLOR]
  • Blackfordburgh = Hooverville
  • Y-Range = Radar
  • Hydrophone = Sonar

TANKS Confederate Models 180px-CSA.jpg

  • Mark 2 (Between Wars) - More familiar shape, with rotating turret. Crew of 5-6; Estimated 37mm gun, 3 machine guns.
  • [COLOR=red]Mark 3 (1941 War)[/COLOR] - Upgraded version of Mk2. Crew of 5; 50mm gun, at least 2 machine guns.
  • [COLOR=red]Mark 4 (1941 War)[/COLOR] - It held a crew of 5; mounted a 75mm cannon, and had at least 2 machine guns.

Unites States Models

180px-US_Southern_Victory.jpg

  • Mark 2 (Between Wars) It carried a crew of 5; mounted a 37mm gun, and carried at least 2 machine guns. IRL: German Sturmpanzerwagen Oberschlesien concept.
  • [COLOR=red]Mark 2.5 (1941 War)[/COLOR] - It carried a crew of 5; and mounted 60mm gun, at least 2 machine guns. It may be compared to the T-34 with 85 mm cannon or the Sherman Firefly of this timeline.



Emperor Norton I

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#2 12 years ago

Freedom Party

Sayings [COLOR=red]"Freedom! Freedom! Freedom!"[/COLOR] - Chant used by members and supporters at rallies. [COLOR=red]"Featherston and Freedom!"[/COLOR] - Stalwarts' battlecry during street-fights. [COLOR=red]"I'm Jake Featherston, and I'm here to tell you the truth."[/COLOR] - The Freedom Party made much use of the word "truth," often using it as a cover to project lies and false justifications for their actions. [COLOR=red]"Repeal the seven words!"[/COLOR] - A slogan used during the campaign to amend the part of the Confederate Constitution limiting the president to a single-term, the last seven words of the aforementioned section. Once amended, the Confederate Constitution allowed Jake Featherston to run multiple times. This, combined with his strong-arm control of Confederate politics, effectively made him president for life. Flag

The Freedom Party used the Confederate Battle Flag, with colors reversed, as their party symbol. (Red bars crossing over a blue blackground). It can be seen at the top of this page.

Uniforms

The Freedom Party stalwarts wore white shirts and butternut khaki trousers as their paramilitary uniform. The origins of this semi-official uniform remains unclear, but Confederate veterans came home in a butternut uniform and wore the trousers as a reminder of their military service. Featherston wore it often before becoming President, and this is probably where the stalwarts got their uniform from. The Freedom Party guards copied their dress from Army uniforms, even sharing the same color until 1940 before switching to gray uniforms as their presence in C.S. society became more pronounced. For everyday Party business (such as guarding Party big-shots or guarding concentration camp inmates), the F.P. guards wore their regular Party uniforms, but for special occasions (such as attending Jefferson Pinkard's wedding in the Autumn of 1942) dress uniforms were worn. Jake Featherston wore an Army sergeant's uniform as his outfit starting on Inauguration Day, March 4, 1934, and every day since then. For official events, such as greeting visiting heads of state (i.e. U.S. President Alfred Smith's visit to Richmond in June 1940), Featherston donned a Freedom Party guard uniform, probably to look more modern and sleek but also to intimidate those around him. During a speech in Louisville in 1941, Featherston vowed that he would not change his outfit until every Confederate territory in U.S. hands was returned to the CSA. Featherston's first vice president, Willy Knight, wore a European field marshal's uniform for Inauguration Day. This irked the chairman of the Freedom Party, not least because it drew attention away from him and towards the ambitious and politically-dangerous Knight. Members of the Freedom government wear Freedom Party uniforms, such as members of the State Department. For some reason, though, both Ferdinand Koenig and Saul Goldman continued to wear everyday business attire in their meetings with Featherston, perhaps wearing Party uniforms at rallies and public appearances. Retrieved from "http://turtledove.wikia.com/wiki/Freedom_Party"




Emperor Norton I

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#3 12 years ago

Fascists & Semi Fascists [COLOR=black]Britain:[/COLOR] Mosley.jpgOswald Mosley Oswald Mosley (b 1896) is head of the Silver Shirts , a far-right political party in Britain He entered into a Government with the Consevative Party as junior coalition partner and became Chancellor of the Exchequer to Winston Churchill's Prime Minister. He exerted tremendous influence on the Government, making the Conservatives resemble the Silver Shirts much more than vice versa. Silver Shirts The Silver Shirts are a far-right party of revanchist nationalists in Britain, headed by Oswald Mosley. They grew quickly in Britain by taking advantage of bitterness and frustration in the wake of Britain's defeat in the Great War, paralleling the rise of the Freedom Party in the Confederate States and the Action Francaise in France. The Silver Shirts seemed likely to become the largest party in Britain in the 1920s. The Conservative Party prevented this by moving to the right under the leadership of Winston Churchill. However, the Silver Shirts entered into a government coalition with the Conservatives, supporting Churchill as Prime Minister and Mosley as Chancellor of the Exchequer. While the Silver Shirts were the junior partner in the coalition, they exerted considerable influence on the Government agenda, and the Conservative Party came to resemble the Silver Shirts much more than vice versa.

Churchill.jpgWinston Churchill A right-wing member of Britain's Conservative Party, Churchill was chosen as that party's leader to prevent Conservative voters from defecting to Oswald Mosley's Silver Shirts. Under Churchill, the Conservatives won control of the Government by entering into a coalition with the Silver Shirts. Churchill would be Prime Minister, Mosley Chancellor of the Exchequer. Mosley would exert tremendous influence of Churchill, and he became nearly indistinguishable from a Silver Shirt himself. Churchill supported the Nationalists in the Spanish Civil War. British and French forces helped the Nationalists to a surprise victory over the German-backed Monarchists. Churchill cooperated with President Jake Featherston of the Confederate States, King Charles XI of France, and Tsar Mikhail II of Russia to restore Entente nations to positions of military strength. In 1941, these rulers launched coordinated assaults on the Central Powers. Churchill would also violate the neutrality of the Netherlands, Norway, and Ireland in 1941, scaring the former country into joining the Central Powers and inspiring the latter to revolt against the British occupiers; however, two of the three invasions were successful, at least initially. (Norwegian and German forces defeated his army in Norway.) Churchill did not trust his allies and refused to share jet technology and research on the atomic bomb with most of them. He and Featherston cooperated in a mission to take Bermuda from the United States, but felt the need to make it clear to Featherston in no uncertain terms that the black residents of Bermuda were under his protection as British citizens, suggesting secret knowledge of the Black Holocaust. In 1943, Churchill took advantage of the Royal Navy's defeat of the High Seas Fleet to begin large-scale operations against the U.S. Navy in the North Atlantic. This proved unwise, as his navy was soundly defeated in the Battle of the North Atlantic and at Bermuda. The US Navy then began supporting the Irish resistance movement. British fortunes suffered elsewhere that year when they were betrayed by Japan, which occupied Hong Kong, Singapore, and Malaya and invaded India; and when Central Powers forces began driving the British out of German and Dutch territory. Through all these setbacks, Churchill, who had by now become the dominant personality throughout the Entente nations of Western Europe, steadfastly refused to concede that British fortunes were suffering.

Conservative Party The Conservative Party is a major political party in Britain. After the Great War, the Silver Shirts, under Oswald Mosley, seemed to be in position to overtake the Conservatives as Britain's rightist party. The Conservatives outflanked the Silver Shirts by shifting farther to the right under the leadership of Winston Churchill. In the 1930s, the Conservatives won control of the Government by entering into a coalition with the Silver Shirts. Churchill became Prime Minister and Mosley became Chancellor of the Exchequer. Association with the Silver Shirts had the effect of moving the Conservatives even farther to the right, especially during the Second Great War. The Conservative leadership became almost indistinguishable from their Silver Shirt counterparts.

France: Charles.jpgCharles XI Charles XI was born Charles Maurras. He was head of the Action Francaise party. When the Party seized control of France, he became King Charles XI. Charles believed that France had been defeated in the Great War as a result of the inherent weakness of its republican government, and that the restoration of the monarchy would likewise restore the military strength of golden ages in French history. Though a monarchist, he supported Spanish Nationalists against the German-backed Spanish Monarchists in the Spanish Civil War--illustrating that France was once again able to challenge Germany on the battlefield. He was also a Catholic theocrat who was extremely suspicious of the motives of Protestant, Jewish, and Freemason public figures. In 1941, Charles, along with his Entente allies Mikhail II of Russia, Winston Churchill and Oswald Mosley of Britain, and Jake Featherston of the Confederate States, launched a series of coordinated assaults against the Central Powers, beginning the Second Great War.

180px-FleurdeLys.jpgAction Francaise Action Francaise is a monarchist, nationalist, revanchist political party which rules France. Action Francaise first appeared in the last years of the 19th Century, in the wake of the Dreyfus Affair and mass-industrialization, though it didn't come to the forefront of French politics until after the end of the Great War. It steadily built up support over the next decade by playing to the frustrations of the French people, and ultimately took power in the wake of the stock market crash of 1929. The party installed its leader, Charles Maurras, as King Charles XI.

Russia 180px-Russia.jpg It was a member of the Entente and started the Great War by protecting Serbia when that country refused Austria-Hungary's ultimata relating to the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. Russia was forced to withdraw from the Great War in 1915 when the Russian Revolution began. The Kingdom of Poland was established on former Russian territory. For the next ten or so years, Russia was embroiled in a bitter civil war between communists and Tsarists. The Tsarists won and installed Tsar Mikhail II on the throne. Mikhail's revanchism was a good match for his Entente allies' similar political ideologies, an alliance which he rejoined upon consolidating power. In 1941 he followed his allies into the Second Great War. The war between Russia and Germany, the largest in Europe, is a mess as each side supports uprising minorities in their enemies' territories. In addition to the Central Powers, Russia is battling German backed Finns, Chechens, Poles, and Jews. The last group is being persecuted by the Russians. Mikhail.jpgMikhail II Tsar Mikhail II (b.November 22, 1878 (O.S.)), or Michael, as he was called in the English-speaking countries, was the ultra-reactionary leader of the Russian Empire during the Second Great War. He was a son of Alexander III of Russia and Dagmar of Denmark. His paternal grandparents were Alexander II of Russia and his first wife Marie of Hesse and by Rhine. His maternal grandparents were Christian IX of Denmark and Louise of Hesse-Kassel. Michael was a younger brother of Nicholas II of Russia, Grand Duke Alexander Alexandrovich of Russia, Grand Duke George Alexandrovich of Russia and Grand Duchess Xenia Alexandrovna of Russia. He was also an elder brother of Grand Duchess Olga Alexandrovna of Russia. At the time of his birth his paternal grandfather Alexander II was still the active Emperor of Russia. Michael was fourth-in-line heir to the throne following his father and elder brothers Nicholas and George. His elder brother Alexander was already deceased. His paternal grandfather was assassinated by Ignacy Hryniewiecki of the Narodnaya Volya on March 13, 1881. His father succeeded him as Emperor of Russia. Nicholas became Heir Apparent while George was second-in-line for the throne. Michael was third-in-line for the throne at this point. Their father Alexander III died on November 1, 1894. Nicholas II became the new Emperor of Russia while George was his Heir Presumptive. Michael was second-in-line for the throne. George suffered from poor health and died from tuberculosis on August 9, 1899. Michael became Heir Presumptive to his still reigning elder brother Nicholas II. He was considered likely to become Emperor of Russia in his own right. Nicholas II and his Empress consort Alexandra Fyodorovna of Hesse were parents to four daughters: Grand Duchess Olga Nikolaevna of Russia, Grand Duchess Tatiana Nikolaevna of Russia, Grand Duchess Maria Nikolaevna of Russia,and Grand Duchess Anastasia of Russia. All four nieces were only eligible for the throne provided that no other male Romanov survived. Michael continued to be Heir Presumptive until August 12, 1904. The birth of Tsarevich Alexei Nikolaevich of Russia to Nicholas II and Alexandra resulted in the newborn becoming Heir Apparent to his father. Michael again became the second-in-line heir to the throne and retained this status for the remaining reign of Nicholas II. Michael began a relationship with Natalya Sergeyevna Wulffert née Sheremetevskaya, a twice-divorced commoner. Their only child, George, was born in 1910, whom Michael named for his elder brother, George. The couple married in secret on October 30, 1912 (N.S.) in Vienna. Natalya was not entitled to be known as Grand Duchess. He ascended to the throne in the late 1920s following the death of his older brother, Nicholas II. The end of the Russian Civil War and the crushing of the Bolsheviks -- the city of Tsaritsin, being led by Joseph Stalin and Vyacheslav Molotov, was one of the last Bolshevik strongholds to fall -- followed not long after. Mikhail's regime was weak as it attempted to rebuild following the disastorous Red rebellions. As the Young Turks had done in Turkey a few years before with the Armenian minority, the tsarist regime sanctioned state-sponsored massacre as a tool of power -- the Black Hundreds led peasants and workers against Jewish communities on pogroms reminiscent to race riots in the Confederate States. With pogroms, Mikhail provided an outlet for the anger and discontentment of the lower classes and prevented them from unleashing another rebellion against the regime.

Confederacy

Jake Featherston Jake Featherston was a sergeant in the artillery of the Confederate States during the Great War, serving in Battery C of the prestigious First Richmond Howitzers. He came out of the war still a mere sergeant due to his role in uncovering Pompey, the black servant of Jeb Stuart III, as a leader in the Red Rebellion. Featherston informed Major Clarence Potter, an Intelligence officer investigating a possible Red Rebellion at the time, that Stuart's servant should be looked into. Captain Stuart used his family's influence to shield the servant. Later, after the Negroes rebelled, it became clear that Pompey had been a Red all along, tarnishing Stuart's reputation forever. Captain Stuart, humiliated and enraged, later sought death in battle, an act for which his father, Jeb Stuart Jr. of the Confederate General Staff, blamed Featherston. Stuart Jr. made certain that Featherston never rose above sergeant as revenge for his son's death. Jake neither forgot nor forgave the offense. Already embittered in the closing days of the war, Featherston began writing a book entitled Over Open Sights. In it, he wrote about the problems in the C.S.A. at the end of the Great War, and proposed his own solutions. This led him into politics, rising to power with the Freedom Party. After a series of set-backs for the Party, Featherston was elected President of the C.S.A. in 1933, after the [stock market crash]. In short order, he established dictatorial control over the Confederacy by: abolishing the Confederate Supreme Court; assassinating Louisiana governor Huey Long (who had dictatorial asperations of his own); imprisoning and murdering his main rival, Vice-President Willy Knight and; amending the Constitution, making him effectively president-for-life. Featherston's foreign policy had two goals: revenge against the United States and Confederate supremacy in North America. To that end, Featherston strengthened ties with Charles XI of France. He encourged anti-U.S. violence in Kentucky, Sequoyah, and Houston, the states that the C.S. had lost to the U.S. at the end of the Great War. United States President Al Smith pursued an accord, which led to the Richmond Agreement, granting plebiscites to the three states. Kentucky and Houston voted to return to the C.S.; Sequoyah, with a substantial population of U.S. transplants, remained in the U.S. However, Featherston had entered into the Agreement in bad faith, making an empty promise that he would not pursue any more territory formerly belonging to the U.S. When he broke his promise by publically demanding the remaining territory, he was met with firm resistance from Smith. In the meantime, war was brewing in Europe, and, in 1941, the CS joined the Entente in declaring war on Germany. It soon became clear to Featherston that Smith was not going to back down and return the territory. It was also clear that the U.S. was not going to immediately stand with Germany as it had in 1914. Thus, he initiated Operation Blackbeard, the invasion of the U.S. wihout a formal declaration of war. Due the initial military success of Blackbeard, Featherston became more cocky and ego-centric, taking a hands-on approach to the strategic aspects of Second Great War. The death of Al Smith during a C.S. bombing raid further inflated Featherston's hubris. He pushed for Operation Coalscuttle to succeed despite the rising losses it took as The Confederate Army pushed throught Pittsburgh and the warnings by his military commanders to pull out of the city. Dissent began to rise due to losses in Pittsburgh and in the Ohio salient. Domestically, Featherston had instituted a series of public works programs. He also modernized agriculture, with an eye to displacing the blacks. Featherston had a strong sense of white superiority, common to Confederate citizens before the Great War. It was fanned into a burning rage during the war, when, despite the Red Rebellion, the increasingly-desperate C.S. used black soldiers on the battlefield. The troops were not particularly well-trained, and so did not always fight well. In Featherston's mind, the Red Rebllion had already proven Confederate blacks treacherous; as far as he was concerned, their inconsistent performance on the battlefield had lost the C.S. the war. Featherston's rapid rise to power in the interwar years fed his ego, eventually giving him a sort of God-complex. After becoming Freedom Party leader and later President, he began to believe he was destined to acheive such power, and began to take all criticism as a grievous offence. By the time the Second Great War broke out, his early victories had him convinced that he was perfect in every way, completely incapable of error. That is why the defeats at Pittsburgh and Ohio came as such a rude awakening to him. His rising anger over his failure, coupled with his constant, manic repetitions of "We will beat them, dammit!", caused high-ranking members of his inner circle, such as Nathan Bedford Forrest III and Clarence Potter, to doubt his fitness to command the CSA. Freedom Party




Emperor Norton I

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#4 12 years ago

[COLOR=black]Divebombers[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]Divebombers are a military airplane technology which debuted in the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Second Great War[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. Divebombers make impossibly steep dives, allowing them to bomb very specific targets, then climb at the same steep angle. A formidable weapon, divebombers are extremely vulnerable to enemy fighters. [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]The [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Mule[/COLOR][COLOR=black] was used as "flying artillery," that is, as pinpoint bombardment tools to accurately neutralize enemy strongpoints and interdict traffic in narrow areas. Gull-winged and equiped with wind-powered sirens that screamed when in a dive, the Mule destroyed U.S. Army artillery, convoys on Lake Erie, and traffic on various roads within the USA's interior lines. [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]The [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Confederate States[/COLOR][COLOR=black] Army used the Mule (also known as [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Asskickers[/COLOR][COLOR=black]), which was regarded by commentators on both sides as being possibly the world's greatest divebomber. They were used against [/COLOR][COLOR=black]United States[/COLOR][COLOR=black] forces to devastating effect in [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Operation Blackbeard[/COLOR][COLOR=black], especially when the Confederate Air Corps designed the tactic of screening them with [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Hound Dogs[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. [/COLOR] [COLOR=black]The US also used divebombers, such as the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Boeing 17[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. In 1942 US divebombers targeted and destroyed the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Gray House[/COLOR][COLOR=black] in [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Richmond[/COLOR][COLOR=black] in a failed attempt to kill [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Jake Featherston[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. In 1943, however, the US Army Air Corps abandoned divebombers in favor of [/COLOR][COLOR=black]fighter-bombers[/COLOR][COLOR=black].[/COLOR]

Mules

Mules, also called Asskickers, are divebombers built by the Confederate States during the Second Great War. They were widely considered the best divebombers in the world at the time. Mules served as "airborne artillery," bombing specific targets that conventional artillery and armor could not reach by diving down at an almost vertical angle and pulling up at the last moment. However, their slow speed and limited maneuverability made them easy targets for enemy fighters and therefore required them to have a fighter escort in areas where the Confederacy did not have air superiority. Like the Ju 87 "Stuka" divebomber of Nazi Germany, Confederate Mules featured distinctive gull-wings, wind-powered sirens (as a means of intimidation for the enemy), and a sophisticated safety-device that automatically pulled the plane out of a dive should the pilot black out.

[COLOR=black]Hound Dog[/COLOR] [COLOR=black]The Hound Dog is the principal fighter of the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Confederate[/COLOR][COLOR=black] Army's Air Corps used in the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Second Great War[/COLOR][COLOR=black]. Hound Dogs are roughly on a par with the [/COLOR][COLOR=black]United States[/COLOR][COLOR=black] Army's [/COLOR][COLOR=black]Wright-27[/COLOR][COLOR=black] fighter. [/COLOR]

Fighter-bomber The fighter-bomber is an innovative aircraft design introduced by the United States during the Second Great War in 1943. The fighter-bombers slung bomb racks beneath fighters, in effect creating bombers which could defend themselves. Some also carried 1.5 inch cannon to destroy barrels. Since fighter-bombers could fly at much lower altitudes than conventional bombers, they were as accurate as divebombers and were superior to these aircraft in most other ways. The fighter-bombers helped the US to gain air superiority over the Confederate States in General Irving Morrell's campaign against Chattanooga as well as in Houston and West Texas.

Wright-27 The Wright-27 is the principal fighter of the United States Army's Air Corps in the Second Great War. It is the only weapon in the US arsenal which is more than a match for the Confederate divebombers known as Mules and is roughly on a par with the Hound Dog fighter.




wolvesgoalie

Ich Bin Das Auto

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17th May 2006

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#5 12 years ago

I can do some weapon and kit editing (damage values etc...). I'm Canadian and therefore know very little about the American civil war (other than it was between the north and south, and there was a dude called General Lee), but if you give me some weapon/vehicle(if any) statistics I can code them in.

Assuming this is for BF2 (I got a bit confused as to which battlefield it is for)




Meadow

You might very well think that

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21st February 2004

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#6 12 years ago

Wow, I'm a big fan of these books, however I have not yet read the Grapple as it is not out in the UK yet. Unfortunately I can't really help you with much modding wise, but only to wish you good luck with this and that I would love to play it. Freedom! (not) ;)