BF2 Crashes -1 reply

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#1 13 years ago

My game crashes after few minutes of play time...the screen will stay still & make a loud noise i cant do nothing just reboot...so then I thought could of been my pc so i re format it im running a 3.0Ghz,2Gigs of Ram,SAPPHIRE ATLANTIS RADEON 9600 Radeon 9600 256MB ..... after the reformat i install bf2 again & same thing can it be my graphic settings all i did was just the screen size to 1024X768@100hz everything is like normal i didn't touch anything ...Oh im running the patch 1.02




OneTinSoldier

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#2 13 years ago

Sounds like you might have some bad RAM, not a good enough Pwer Supply, or something in your system is getting too hot. The last possibility, and the worst one,is that some piece of hardware is starting to go bad, for instance your video card. Here is a write-up that I made a while back... Troubleshooting: So, it sounds like what your compter did was 'reboot'? Right? Also known as a 'Spontaneous Reboot'. I say this because you say... "When the computer restored, the message, 'Your computer has recovered from a serious problem'; appeared." This means that the Game didn't crash, it means the Operating System(OS) crashed. So it is more serious than a bug in the game. The crashing of the OS was only prompted by the use of a resource intensive piece of software(the game). It was not caused by the peice of software alone and all by itself. What I mean by this is that the System is made up of a lot of things, Software(the OS being a large part of that), some low-level software called Device Drivers, and Hardware. What I am driving at is that a Spontaneous Reboot is the symptom of a more deeply rooted problem in your System than just some bug in the game. It could be a Device Driver problem, a problem with poor RAM in your system, or possibly a loose connection somewhere. OR, most likely a Heating problem. The problem you have described is usually the sign of too much heat building up in a system. Computer Systems are one of the most complex devices made by humankind. So, without futher ado... --------------------------------------------- I thought I'd list some possible reasons behind the cause of system problems/instability. 1) chkdsk - A simple 'chkdsk' on a command prompt to make sure there are no filesystem problems that need fixing. WinXP usually handles this automatically when you reboot after it has detected an error in the filesystem. But ya never know, so just to be sure you might want to run a chkdsk. 2) DxDiag - You could run DxDiag, run through all the tests and then see if it's reporting any problems. You can also try turning down the 'Hardware Acceleration' slider on the Sound tab and see if that cures your problem. Click the 'Save All Information' button(on the very first 'Tab' that DxDiag displays when you start it) and save the text file somewhere. Open up the text file and then copy and paste it's contents on the forum here for people to look at. You'd be surprised the number of times problems have been solved by doing this. 3) If you have Dr. Watson enabled(enabled by default on WinXP) then look at it's log file and open it up with Wordpad. First, click [ Start --> Run --> drwtsn32 --> press Enter --> look at 'Log File Path' at the very top ]. Go to where that log file is stored on your hard drive and then open it up with Wordpad. It might be helpful if you post the details contained in it concerning the crash. Although, this suggestion does not lead to a cure for problems as often as posting the 'DxDiag' information and is usually only helpful to a Developer. 4) Mods - Some Unofficial modifications to an application can sometimes causes instability. Make sure you are running an unmodified installation of the software before seeking help with problems. 5) PSU. A cheap or faulty PSU(Power Supply Unit, or just 'Power Supply'). Or, one that is not neccessarily faulty, but does not supply the system with enough Power(juice, hehe). Your PSU must have a high enough power rating to supply all your components with enough juice. If you have quite a number of PCI addon cards, hard drives, optical drives and other types of hardware attached that draw power then the PSU must be up to the task. Newer Video Cards require quite a bit of power compared to ones from the old days. The Power Supply is one of the more underrated components in a PC. The Power Supply is actually pretty darned important. 6) Loose PCI Cards - PCI Cards that are not firmly in their slot. If a PCI card is even just slightly loose it can cause problems. You might want to turn off your computer and then open up your case and pull each card out and then stick it back in. Sometimes you can't tell just by looking. 7) Overheating - If your system's CPU or Northbridge chip is getting too hot then you will have system instablities that rear their ugly head when you run resource intensive applications(such as games). You might be able to determine this by taking off the side cover of your PC, and then get a fan and point it so that it is blowing right into the inside of your system. 8) IRQ Sharing conflicts - Some PCI slots share IRQ's(Interrupt Requests) with each other. You can usually find this information in the manual for your motherboard. Some PCI addon cards are capable of handling this. Some are not. For instance, IIRC one of the PCI slots in my machine shares an IRQ with the AGP slot(which is where my video card is). SO, I made sure that my Sound Card is not in the PCI slot that shares the IRQ with the AGP slot. In fact, I made sure to not put anything in the PCI slot that shares the IRQ with the AGP slot. Also, if you have an addon (PCI Slot) sound card and also have a sound card built into your motherboard(onboard sound), it is possible the two are conflicting. You may need to go into your BIOS and disable the onboard sound. 9) Drivers - You should make sure you have the latest BIOS for your motherboard, the latest Chipset drivers for you motherboard, the latest Sound Card driver, the latest driver for your Network Interface Card(NIC), the latest driver for your Mouse, the latest driver for your Monitor. If there is a driver for your mouse and/or monitor that is. My monitor has a driver that came as a .inf file. There's probably other hardware you have that require device drivers too. Make sure you have the lastest device drivers installed for all your hardware. Note: When it comes to Video Card drivers the latest one is not neccessarily the best one. 10) Motherboard - Hopefully this is not the problem, but, there is the possibility that you have a defective motherboard. 11) RAM - You could possibly have a bad stick of RAM. Or your RAM could be just plain unstable due to improper settings in the BIOS. Settings such as CAS/RAS and/or other RAM timing settings that are set to aggressively, or an incorrect vDimm setting. That is, if your BIOS allows you to adjust these settings. You can download and run 'memtest86' to check your RAM. You need to let it run for a considerable amount of time though to see if it encounters any errors. The following is a little story I have about a situation I had with some RAM. -------------------------------------- I put my system together and purchased some Mushkin Low Latency RAM(Special 2-2-2) made from Winbond BH-6 chips. You had to bump up the vDimm voltage(amount of voltage supplied to the ram modules) in your BIOS to 2.65v in order to use this memory. I had two 512 MB sticks of this RAM so I could run in Dual Channel mode. Well, one of those first two sticks was bad right off the bat. Fortunately for me, Muskin's main office is in the city I live in. So I took it down there and they exchanged it for me. They had run 'memtest86' on it and said it checked out ok. When I put it in my system I had 'Fast Boot' disabled in my BIOS and it checked out fine. Disabling the 'Fast Boot' option in your BIOS causes your system to run a check on the RAM, not as thorough of a check as a utlity such as memtest86 does on it though. Everything was fine, it seemed. Well, the problem for me was I would be playing a BF1942 mod called 'Forgotten Hope' and eventually my game would either crash with an error(this would happen a number of times throughout the day), or I would get a loud digital screeching sound, the screen would go black, my hard drive would go thunk, and then my system would spontaneously reboot(happened once or twice a day). This is not the only game that would crash after some time with an error message either. Also, on a somewhat rare occasion I would have a subtle error occur when I booted up WinXP. I would get a message that said, 'One of the system registry files is corrupt and had to be recovered from a backup copy. The recovery was successful.' It took some months before I really started having these problems. But they did happen and started to happen more and more frequently over time. And I lived with them for some time after they started happening(because I could use my computer for hours until the problem occured). I finally got fed up enough to where I started trying to think about what the problem could be. Eventually, for reasons hard to explain, I came to the conclusion that something was getting hosed up in memory. So I went into my BIOS and disabled the 'Fast Bootup' option. Again, when this is disabled it runs a test on your RAM. The test of my RAM got as far as 470 MB's at which point it encountered a R/W(read/write) error. Well, my Mushkin RAM had a lifetime warranty on it. So I called them up and the fellow explained that the Winbond BH-6 stuff I had was a hit or miss proposition(yeah, pretty much miss I thought to myself, lol). He told me that they now had some modules that are made from a different process than the old BH-6 stuff, is very stable, doesn't require a bump in the vDimm voltage, and it has the Low-Latency memory timing capability(CAS/RAS 2-2-2). And that they would give me the newer stuff in exchange for the old Winbond BH-6 modules I currently had, since they were bad. After the exchange for the newer and better stuff, I have had 100 percent rock solid stability. -------------------------------------- Hope that helps, OneTinSoldier




OneTinSoldier

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#3 13 years ago

I decided to make a couple of additions to the truobleshooting list and though I would go ahead and post them for completeness... 12) Some peice of hardware in your system, your video card for instance, may not have fully failed yet but may be starting to go on the fritz. 13) A somewhat remote possibility but nevertheless a possibility is the your CPU is not quite seated properly in it's socket and needs to be reseated. 14) You have 'Fast Writes' enabled for your video card and it is causing system instablities.




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#4 13 years ago

when my bf2 crashes i dont see the "the computer restored, the message, 'Your computer has recovered from a serious problem'; appeared." it boots like normal.




OneTinSoldier

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#5 13 years ago

Yes, I realize from your first post that your computer system is not spontaneously rebooting, hence the reason you are not receiving the message 'Your computer has recovered from a serious problem'. I just copied and pasted the entire write-up that I made some time ago for completeness. That's why that message is in my post. Now, in your latest post you did not even state whether or not you have tried to follow any of the troubleshooting procedures listed. If I lived near where you do I could come over and try to do it myself. Although there is a chance, I doubt that I live near you. So, that means the ball is in your court and you are going to have to take some steps yourself to try and find out what's wrong. You might not feel comfortable trying every single thing I have listed, such as reseating your CPU. That's understandable. And let's say your Power Supply(PSU) is the problem for instance. That could be a hard problem to troubleshoot. But it is possible to take a look at it and see what brand it is and what kind of power rating it has. If you did that and then came back and posted that information then perhaps me or someone else would have an idea if it's rating is suffcient for your system components, or whether it's such a crappy brand that it might be cause for concern and most likely need replacement to be certain about ruling it out as a possibility as the problem. The problem could be something as simple as turning down the Hardware Acceleration Sound slider for in DxDiag. In other words it could be something as simple as a configuration problem in the OS or in your BIOS. Those are just a some examples. But without you taking some action to try and troubleshoot and then post what you have gone over with your attempt at troubleshooting then I nor anyone else will know anything other than what's in your original post, which means we can't rule anything out yet. Unfortunately, it's very unlikely that anyone will know exactly what's wrong with your system from the description you gave in your original post. That may have been what you were hoping for, and I wish that I knew just exactly what's wrong right now with no further information. But I don't, and like I said, I doubt anyone will. Again, if I could come over to your house and start troubleshooting your system myself for you I would, but I can't, unless you live in the Denver area. Regards, OneTinSoldier




OneTinSoldier

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#6 13 years ago

Oh, and I sould write that if you need help with procedures I might be able to help, maybe. Such as determining if one of your sticks of RAM is bad. For that I did list that your can download and run Memtest86+. But I did not list that what you can do to try and determine which stick it is. To do that you can take out all the sticks of ram except one. Run Memtest86 on it. If it has no errors in the test you know it's a good stick, so take it out and then put in one of the other sticks. Run Memtest86 on that stick. Do that for each stick of ram until you find that they are either all good or which one is bad. When handling your cpu or ram make sure that you have touched something metal(that is grounded) to remove any possibility of static electricity buildup in your body before touching them! Those components are very sensitive to an electric static shock. If they received and electric static shock when you touch them then they could possibly be rendered useless. If you are not comfortable with any of this then you may need to take your system down to a shop, such as Best Buy, CompUSA, or a smaller outfit that specializes in nothing but computers in order have the problem troubleshot and resolved. Naturally, this would mean paying a fee for their services.