Blue screen after playing multiplayer (1.2) -1 reply

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Lupin

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26th July 2004

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#1 13 years ago

I have a problem with bf2 after installing the 1.2 patch. After playing multiplayer map(s) for around a hour (about 2 maps) my comp goes straight to the blue screen of death. I know it cant be over heating because I have played bf2 with 100 bots (via a little file I toyed around with) and full gfx and could play for hours upon hours. So any ideas on what could be the problem (I exceed all the requirements.)? I just dont want to wait ages for a 1.3 patch.




Lupin

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#2 13 years ago

Any ideas at all? Or am I just going to have to twiddle my thumbs untill 1.3 comes out?




OneTinSoldier

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24th October 2004

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#3 13 years ago

Well I aqm not certain just what the problem is, but usually a BSOD points to a driver or other system problem, such as overheating as you already pointed out. Have you changed anything else on your system besides updating BF2 to 1.02(and it is 1.02 not 1.2)? There really shouldn't be any reason for you to get a BSOD just because you have updated to 1.02. Kind of a pain, but you could always try uninstalling BF2, delete the folder, and then reinstall it and update to 1.02 again to see if that cures it. Although it's unlikely there is a possibility that the patch didn't get installed 100% properly.




Lupin

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#4 13 years ago

Thanks for the help OneTinSoldier, I will try reinstalling BF2 later. I have noticed that more times than not when the game blue screens its when im in a tank and get blown up by heli-rockets. Perhaps it might be my sound card?




OneTinSoldier

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#5 13 years ago

Yeah... it could be. I probably can't be of much further help, but I would be curious to see a couple of things... 1) The type of error you get in the BSOD(is it an exception error?) and the name of the file it's BSOD'ing on. 2) Your System Specs. If you don't want to go to the trouble though that's fine, no worries. OneTinSoldier System Specs: Intel 3.4C(C = Northwood Core) on Asus P4C800-E Deluxe(Intel 875P + ICH5R Chipset), Zalman 7000a-Cu HS/Fan, Enermax RG651P-VE 550W PSU, 1 GB Mushkin High Performance(2-2-2) PC3200 RAM, NEC MultiSync FE2111SB 21" Monitor, Sapphire Radeon X800 XT PE Videocard with v5.6 Catalyst Drivers, DirectX 9.0c, Creative Audigy2 Platinum Soundcard with Creative OpenAL Beta Driver, 250 GB w/8 MB Cache Western Digital HDD, WinXP Pro SP2




Lupin

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#6 13 years ago

The weird thing is that the BSOD doesnt display any info, its just blank. Heres my system info (pasted from belarcadvisor): OS: Windows XP Media Center Edition Service Pack 2 (build 2600) Processor: 3.00 gigahertz Intel Pentium 4 16 kilobyte primary memory cache 2048 kilobyte secondary memory cache Drives: 243.48 Gigabytes Usable Hard Drive Capacity 212.73 Gigabytes Hard Drive Free Space PIONEER DVD-RW DVR-109 [CD-ROM drive] SAMSUNG CD-ROM SC-148A Memory: 1024 Megabytes Installed Memory Video card: RADEON X800 Series 256mb [Display adapter] Sound cards (?): Realtek High Definition Audio Unimodem Half-Duplex Audio Device MB: Board: Intel Corporation D915GRO AAC89748-201 Bus Clock: 200 megahertz BIOS: Intel Corp. EV91510A.04T.0051.2005.0313.1931 03/13/2005




OneTinSoldier

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#7 13 years ago

The Realtek High Definition Audio is your Sound Card. I believe that is an onboard Sound Card that implements the AC97 Codec to carry out it's duties. It's integrated onto your motherboard as opposed to being an Add-on PCI Slot type of card. These integrated sound cards usually aren't too good. Nevertheless I would think that it should work ok. Search the web to see if there are drivers you can download for it thereby making sure you have the lastest version of the driver. It's also possible this driver for might be included in your Chipset drivers. If so, see if there is a newer version of Chipset drivers for your motherboard(you should do this anyway). Also, what are your Sound settings in the game? Hardware or Software? Lastly, you can try and open up DxDiag and going to the Sound tab and turn down the Hardware Acceleration slider to Basic. Start --> Run --> type in DxDiag --> press Enter --> go to the tab labeled 'Sound' It wouldn't surprise me if this integrated Realtek sound card is the crux of your problem, since you seem to have a feeling that it could be your sound card. But of course it could be something else. Still, kind of strange that your problem surfaced only after updating to the 1.02 patch. Updating the driver for it or turning down the Hardware slider in DxDiag to Basic as well as setting the sound to Software in the game might solve your problem. Let me know how it goes! ;) Hope that helps, OTS




Lupin

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#8 13 years ago

Thanks for replying. I will download drivers for all my hardware and test bf2 online as soon as I get to my moms house with the DSL (56k right now). My sound is on software. It seems to bluescreen with software and hardware. One final thing- I just noticed that I can still play bf2 on single player without bluescreening... It must be something about multiplayer..




Guest

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#9 13 years ago

I am also having this problem, only mine is a little different. I have played v1 before the patch since the first day that the game came out with no problems. Since I have upgraded to v1.02 I keep getting a blue screen for a second or two then my computer reboots. I think it might have something to do with memory, but I am not sure because the screen doesn't stay up long enough for me to read it. I deleted all of the original files and even upgraded my motherboard BIOS. I have reinstalled the game and upgraded Punkbuster, but I am still having the blue screen problem. I know that EA was trying to fix some kind of memory leak with this upgrade... Could they have done something to the program that makes my system have memory issues? It should be noted that the game ran fine for me with the 1.01 patch. This issue has only started happening since the 1.02 patch. I would appreciate any help.




OneTinSoldier

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#10 13 years ago

Don't know if this will help, but here is a little write-up I made a while ago... --------------------------------------------- I thought I'd list some possible reasons behind the cause of system problems/instability. 1) chkdsk - A simple 'chkdsk' on a command prompt to make sure there are no filesystem problems that need fixing. WinXP usually handles this automatically when you reboot after it has detected an error in the filesystem. But ya never know, so just to be sure you might want to run a chkdsk. 2) DxDiag - You could run DxDiag, run through all the tests and then see if it's reporting any problems. You can also try turning down the 'Hardware Acceleration' slider on the Sound tab and see if that cures your problem. Click the 'Save All Information' button(on the very first 'Tab' that DxDiag displays when you start it) and save the text file somewhere. Open up the text file and then copy and paste it's contents on the forum here for people to look at. You'd be surprised the number of times problems have been solved by doing this. 3) If you have Dr. Watson enabled(enabled by default on WinXP) then look at it's log file and open it up with Wordpad. First, click [ Start --> Run --> drwtsn32 --> press Enter --> look at 'Log File Path' at the very top ]. Go to where that log file is stored on your hard drive and then open it up with Wordpad. It might be helpful if you post the details contained in it concerning the crash. Although, this suggestion does not lead to a cure for problems as often as posting the 'DxDiag' information and is usually only helpful to a Developer. 4) Mods - Some Unofficial modifications to an application can sometimes causes instability. Make sure you are running an unmodified installation of the software before seeking help with problems. 5) PSU. A cheap or faulty PSU(Power Supply Unit, or just 'Power Supply'). Or, one that is not neccessarily faulty, but does not supply the system with enough Power(juice, hehe). Your PSU must have a high enough power rating to supply all your components with enough juice. If you have quite a number of PCI addon cards, hard drives, optical drives and other types of hardware attached that draw power then the PSU must be up to the task. Newer Video Cards require quite a bit of power compared to ones from the old days. The Power Supply is one of the more underrated components in a PC. The Power Supply is actually pretty darned important. 6) Loose PCI Cards - PCI Cards that are not firmly in their slot. If a PCI card is even just slightly loose it can cause problems. You might want to turn off your computer and then open up your case and pull each card out and then stick it back in. Sometimes you can't tell just by looking. 7) Overheating - If your system's CPU or Northbridge chip is getting too hot then you will have system instablities that rear their ugly head when you run resource intensive applications(such as games). You might be able to determine this by taking off the side cover of your PC, and then get a fan and point it so that it is blowing right into the inside of your system. 8) IRQ Sharing conflicts - Some PCI slots share IRQ's(Interrupt Requests) with each other. You can usually find this information in the manual for your motherboard. Some PCI addon cards are capable of handling this. Some are not. For instance, IIRC one of the PCI slots in my machine shares an IRQ with the AGP slot(which is where my video card is). SO, I made sure that my Sound Card is not in the PCI slot that shares the IRQ with the AGP slot. In fact, I made sure to not put anything in the PCI slot that shares the IRQ with the AGP slot. Also, if you have an addon (PCI Slot) sound card and also have a sound card built into your motherboard(onboard sound), it is possible the two are conflicting. You may need to go into your BIOS and disable the onboard sound. 9) Drivers - You should make sure you have the latest BIOS for your motherboard, the latest Chipset drivers for you motherboard, the latest Sound Card driver, the latest driver for your Network Interface Card(NIC), the latest driver for your Mouse, the latest driver for your Monitor. If there is a driver for your mouse and/or monitor that is. My monitor has a driver that came as a .inf file. There's probably other hardware you have that require device drivers too. Make sure you have the lastest device drivers installed for all your hardware. Note: When it comes to Video Card drivers the latest one is not neccessarily the best one. 10) Motherboard - Hopefully this is not the problem, but, there is the possibility that you have a defective motherboard. 11) RAM - You could possibly have a bad stick of RAM. Or your RAM could be just plain unstable due to improper settings in the BIOS. Settings such as CAS/RAS and/or other timing settings, or an incorrect vDimm setting. That is, if your BIOS allows you to adjust these settings. The following is a little story I have about a situation I had with some RAM. -------------------------------------- I put my system together and purchased some Mushkin Low Latency RAM(Special 2-2-2) made from Winbond BH-6 chips. You had to bump up the vDimm voltage(amount of voltage supplied to the ram modules) in your BIOS to 2.65v in order to use this memory. I had two 512 MB sticks of this RAM so I could run in Dual Channel mode. Well, one of those first two sticks was bad right off the bat. Fortunately for me, Muskin's main office is in the city I live in. So I took it down there and they exchanged it for me. They had run 'memtest86' on it and said it checked out ok. When I put it in my system I had 'Fast Boot' disabled in my BIOS and it checked out fine. Disabling the 'Fast Boot' option in your BIOS causes your system to run a check on the RAM, not as thorough of a check as a utlity such as memtest86 does on it though. Everything was fine, it seemed. Well, the problem for me was I would be playing a BF1942 mod called 'Forgotten Hope' and eventually my game would either crash with an error(this would happen a number of times throughout the day), or I would get a loud digital screeching sound, the screen would go black, my hard drive would go thunk, and then my system would spontaneously reboot(happened once or twice a day). This is not the only game that would crash after some time with an error message either. Also, on a somewhat rare occasion I would have a subtle error occur when I booted up WinXP. I would get a message that said, 'One of the system registry files is corrupt and had to be recovered from a backup copy. The recovery was successful.' It took some months before I really started having these problems. But they did happen and started to happen more and more frequently over time. And I lived with them for some time after they started happening(because I could use my computer for hours until the problem occured). I finally got fed up enough to where I started trying to think about what the problem could be. Eventually, for reasons hard to explain, I came to the conclusion that something was getting hosed up in memory. So I went into my BIOS and disabled the 'Fast Bootup' option. Again, when this is disabled it runs a test on your RAM. The test of my RAM got as far as 470 MB's at which point it encountered a R/W(read/write) error. Well, my Mushkin RAM had a lifetime warranty on it. So I called them up and the fellow explained that the Winbond BH-6 stuff I had was a hit or miss proposition(yeah, pretty much miss I thought to myself, lol). He told me that they now had some modules that are made from a different process than the old BH-6 stuff, is very stable, doesn't require a bump in the vDimm voltage, and it has the Low-Latency memory timing capability(CAS/RAS 2-2-2). And that they would give me the newer stuff in exchange for the old Winbond BH-6 modules I currently had, since they were bad. After the exchange for the newer and better stuff, I have had 100 percent rock solid stability. -------------------------------------- It's hard to know if your problem is a driver problem or any of the things I mention above at all. It could be something else altogether, like a BIOS setting or some other configuration problem. But other folks might be able to try and help you out better if you could list your System Specifications similar to the following example.... System Specs: Intel 3.4C(C = Northwood Core) on Asus P4C800-E Deluxe(Intel 875P + ICH5R Chipset), Zalman 7000a-Cu HS/Fan, Enermax RG651P-VE 550W PSU, 1 GB Mushkin High Performance(2-2-2) PC3200 RAM, NEC MultiSync FE2111SB 21" Monitor, Sapphire Radeon X800 XT PE Videocard with v5.6 Catalyst Drivers, DirectX 9.0c, Creative Audigy2 Platinum Soundcard with Creative OpenAL Beta Driver, 250 GB w/8 MB Cache Western Digital HDD, WinXP Pro SP2 Listing system specs alone usually does not lead to a cure for system problems. Nevertheless, at the very least it gives people a starting point pertaining to helping troubleshoot problems. Hope that helps, OneTinSoldier