JANES USAF Models for BFV??? -1 reply

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btravis02

I'm too cool to Post

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29th July 2004

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#1 14 years ago

I'm not a modder...skinner, or anything near this..but i was rummaging thru files and noticed alot of Aircraft in the Janes USAF uncontrollable Aircraft folder. My interest was sparked when i Noticed a A-1 Skyraider 3d cad models,which played a huge role in viet, with the complete Skin. The Files are in these formats .cp .P3D .bmp .tga Anyways...My thoughts were Is it were possible to Convert these files to BFV format? like i said i know nothing about 3d models and such, but thought it would be a good idea and could make for a cool Mod. Lemme know what all u think...cuz i sure as hell dont know.




H0bbes

The Internet ends at GF

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19th July 2004

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#2 14 years ago

idk about that skinnin crap but i can tell u something noob rymes with boob is cuz of its voule o oconnect to another oo equals a .. There are three types of true rhymes: masculine rhymes, in which the final syllable of the word or line is stressed ("spring," "bring"); feminine rhymes, in which two consecutive syllables, the first of which is accented, are alike in sound ("certain," "curtain"); and triple rhymes, in which all three syllables of a word are identical ("flowery," "showery"). Words in which the vowel and the following consonants in a stressed syllable are identical in sound, even if spelled differently, are called perfect rhymes ("two" and "too," or "spring" and "bring"). In eye, or sight, rhyme the words look as if they rhyme, but do not: "move," "love." Slant, or oblique, rhyme uses words with an imperfect match of sounds. Within this category, consonance relies on the similarity of consonant sounds: "shift," "shaft"; assonance relies on the similarity of vowel sounds: "grow," "home." A pair of rhyming lines is called a couplet; three lines that rhyme are called a triplet. Traditional poetic forms have prescribed rhyming patterns; for example, sonnets usually follow the Italian rhyme scheme, abba abba cde cde, or the English rhyme scheme, abab cdcd efef gg. Blank verse is regular in meter but does not rhyme; free verse is irregular in meter and also does not rhyme. .....get it now:deal::smokin::smokin:




DnC

GF's Cognitive Psychologist

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14th April 2004

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#3 14 years ago

what?