Foreign war films? 21 replies

Please wait...

Overwatch

Woot!

50 XP

6th June 2005

0 Uploads

1,189 Posts

0 Threads

#1 10 years ago

Knowing there's a whole world of foreign films out there I was wondering if you guys could recommend any foreign language war movies, I added in language there, knowing someone would probably say "Enemy at the Gates" because it is set in Russia, but I mean actual foreign made ones. I don't want to see any more war movies made about americans. There's a few I know, that I can start naming Downfall, WW2 (german) Brotherhood of War, Korean war (Korea) I haven't seen Days of Glory or A Very Long Engagement But they both look excellent, any one else have any recomendations?




MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

216,815 XP

7th December 2003

0 Uploads

19,996 Posts

6 Threads

#2 10 years ago

From what I hear "Talvisota" is supposed to be a good war movie about the winter war, but I haven't seen it yet.

"Das Boot" is one of the best movies ever made in Germany and probably one of the best movies about WW2 submarine warfare as well.

It can be also interesting to watch old Russian war movies, but they are difficult to find and at best subtitled.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

735,271 XP

9th December 2003

0 Uploads

71,460 Posts

0 Threads

#3 10 years ago
MrFancypants;4524411It can be also interesting to watch old Russian war movies, but they are difficult to find and at best subtitled.

That would imply dubbed movies are better (easier to follow). I guess you didn't mant that but I have to say that subtitles are better then voice overs (dubbed) movies since so much goes lost if subtitles aren't used. It just makes for a very ackward experience (it certainly does when you compare a dubbed and undubbed movie).

Their's the Glory, a british movie from 1945 is interesting aswell. It's about the battle of Arnhem (part of Operation Market Garden) featuring the soldiers who fought in Arnhem and Oosterbeek in September 1944. It's nice for a change to see soldiers being soldiers instead of actors. Compared to modern movies like Der Untergang and Letters from Iwo Jimma it might not be as special (as in: lots of awesome graphics and such) but if you take the age of the film into consideration it's a good movie.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

216,815 XP

7th December 2003

0 Uploads

19,996 Posts

6 Threads

#4 10 years ago

I don't mind watching subtitled movies, but I know many people prefer dubbed movies, even if much is lost in translation.

Sometimes the quality of the sub titles is so bad though that I'd rather watch a dubbed version - that happened to me a few times when watching old Japanese Samurai movies (by Korusawa) with english subtitles.




bigdoggie

Der tekniker

50 XP

28th December 2004

0 Uploads

12,682 Posts

0 Threads

#5 10 years ago

God, I hate dubbed movies :(

I don't really know many foreign war movies, the only one I do know however is The Downfall, wich you already stated.




Junk angel

Huh, sound?

166,880 XP

29th January 2007

0 Uploads

15,678 Posts

0 Threads

#6 10 years ago

I think one of the better czech war movies was a dark blue world.

AS to dubbed or subtitled. Subtitled tends to be normally so much better. Since you get a far better look at the emotional colorings of the voices.

It's rare that there's a dub that's on the same quality as the original, and even rarer when it's better. Though even that happens at times.




Mephistopheles

IME and myself

50 XP

28th December 2004

0 Uploads

2,054 Posts

0 Threads

#7 10 years ago

I think the German war movie "Stalingrad" is also worth watching.

Here is the trailer:




bigdoggie

Der tekniker

50 XP

28th December 2004

0 Uploads

12,682 Posts

0 Threads

#8 10 years ago

Wow, that looks great! Another one for mah to-get list =p




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

735,271 XP

9th December 2003

0 Uploads

71,460 Posts

0 Threads

#9 10 years ago

Yup, I'll need to get my hands on that on aswell. :)




Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#10 10 years ago

Ballada o Soldate

During World War II, 19 year old soldier Alyosha gets a medal as a reward for a heroic act at the front. Instead of this medal he asks for a few days leave to visit his mother and repair the roof of their home. On the train eastwards he meets Shura who is on her way to her aunt.

I watched this and was pretty satisfied with it.

Review:

Spoiler: Show

n World War Two, almost thirty million Russian soldiers and civilians were killed in the fight against fascism, a fact mainly ignored during the paranoia of the Cold War. In our attempt to demonize everything Russian, we also overlooked stories of individual heroism. In 1959, Russian director Grigory Chukhraj made a film attempting to describe "what happens when the world loses a single person" and it is a masterpiece. The beautiful and moving Ballad of a Soldier tells a personal story that illuminates how war can ravish both an individual and a country. The film is set in Russia in the midst of the war. Pvt. Alyosha Skvortsov (Vladimir Ivashov), a signaller, has earned a commendation by destroying two German tanks. Instead of accepting a medal, he requests to be granted a four-day leave to go home and visit his mother.

We learn early through the narration that this soldier did not survive the war so his journey home to visit his mother for one last time becomes all the more poignant. The film, however, is not about a destination but about a journey. The four-day trip encompasses a lifetime of experience. Before hiding out in a freight car, Alyosha encourages a soldier (Yevgeny Urbansky) who has lost his leg to go home to his wife. Along the way, he hitches a ride on a rain-soaked road with a woman deprived of sleep for 48 hours. He brings a present of soap to an unfaithful wife of another soldier but changes his mind and gives it to her father who longs for his son's return. He also meets Shura (Zhanna Prokhorenko), a radiant young woman who, like him, hides out in a freight car. Reluctant at first and fearful of Alyosha, the young couple experiences their first love in several sensitive scenes but it is to be short-lived.

Ballad of a Soldier, of course, aims to present Russian soldiers in the best possible light yet Chukhraj does not hesitate to show his characters as real human beings with flaws. A venal security guard is willing to grant the young soldier free passage in a freight car in exchange for cans of beef, and the wife of a soldier is unfaithful to her soldier husband, a sequence that landed the director in trouble with the Russian censors. In Alyosha, Chukhraj has created a good person: kind, loving, and noble but not larger than life, a soldier perhaps typical of millions of young men who gave their lives to protect their homeland. Their struggle and personal sacrifice has been immortalized in a great film.

Idi i smotri (Come and See)

A boy is unwillingly thrust into the atrocities of war in WWII Byelorussia, fighting for a hopelessly unequipped resistance movement against the ruthless German forces. Witnessing scenes of abject terror and accidentally surviving horrifying situations he loses his innocence and then his mind.

This is probably one of the most horrifying movies I have ever seen.

Review:

Spoiler: Show

In all fairness, this Belorussian-made World War II picture detailing Nazi atrocities, holds a special distinction in world cinema: it is by far the most brutal and emotionally draining of all - in fact, a viewer whose senses have not been properly trained would most likely find it unwatchable. Those brave souls willing to be put through an ordeal of almost 2 1/2 hours will find themselves deeply immersed in an absolutely horrifying experience that will not easily subside whether they want it to or not.

The title, "Come and See", taken from the frequently repeating lines of the book of Revelation, clearly dares the audience to assume the role of St. John, witnessing the Apocalypse, or rather one of the darkest periods in the history of humankind. What we are assaulted with, plays somewhat like a demented version of "Modern Times" transpiring across the panel of Brueghel's "Trimuph of Death", if such a combination is possible. The camera is consistently filtered through a murky, slightly unfocused gaze, and the sound is often heard through shellshocked ears. This tends to eirly distance the events, yet make them even more frightening and unsettling. Much of the dialogue lacks specific meaning or even concrete sentences - it is replaced by subhuman growling, wailing and other spine-chilling, gluttural sounds of the war. What the director prepares is something Spielberg would never even dream of - no sign of compromise with the audience. A crowd of civilian villagers locked up in a barn by Nazi soldiers is not spared at the last minute like "Schindler List's" Jews- they are burned alive, and we get to watch all of it.

Unlike most of the films in this genre, "Come and see" relies mainly on images and sounds instead of a coherent plot, which is not necesserily a weakness, since the sheer terror distorts time and space into a kind of hallucinatory blur, clearly intentional and understandable. But this incredible level of bleak intensity in the long run, has a negative effect on the film: the viewers have to desensitize themselves just so they can keep watching, so the most harrowing scenes are sat through in numbness.

Another questionable move on the director's part is his occasional use of surrealism. While some visuals are painfully believable, while others are simply baffling: crazed villages consructing an effigy of Hitler, a pensive German commander with a pet slender loris (a rare African primate) on his shoulder, a female Nazi eating raw red lobster, not even mentioning a bizzare final montage wich is both inexplicable and obvious, ending with a real-life photograph that is perhaps the most terrifying of all in its implications.

Yes, at times the movie overachieves its goals and seems almost like the footage in "The Clockwork Orange" that they made Alex watch to cure him of "ultraviolent" behaviour; yet other times it delivers the kind of jolts those accustomed to mainstream cinema could only wish they had. The face of a youth who had lost all sanity and aged many decades over several days, will be etched for an indefinite amount of time into the memory of anyone who has seen this film.