Pirates of the Caribbean 3 75 replies

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MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#71 11 years ago
mad cat;3717704For example in the first movie, when jack's in the pearl's cells and says "stop blowing holes in my ship", you see the hull is just so damn thin and that it all just blows through, if it takes waves, it must take water...

Wooden ships take water all the time anyway. Shotholes were usually plugged and water pumped out. More critical are hits below the waterline that can occur when your ship is hit on the swell.

Much more dangerous about a hit in the hull are the large, fast and sharp pieces of wood that cut the crew to pieces. That's why the gun-deck was also sometimes called the "slaughterhouse".




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#72 11 years ago
MrFancypants;3717720 Much more dangerous about a hit in the hull are the large, fast and sharp pieces of wood that cut the crew to pieces. That's why the gun-deck was also sometimes called the "slaughterhouse".

Not true, the Mythbusters showed the splinters coming from the impact of a cannonball are not deadly at all unless you are incredibly unlucky and one maybe hits you in the jugular. The way to take out a ship would be by either smashing it's hull so badly that you take out all of it's guns or by aiming for the masts and riggings and taking those out. In reality unless you hit under the water level or it is really wavy and you smash enough holes the ship will never sink.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#73 11 years ago
Afterburner;3717759Not true, the Mythbusters showed the splinters coming from the impact of a cannonball are not deadly at all unless you are incredibly unlucky and one maybe hits you in the jugular.

They used the wrong testing-conditions so they arrived at a wrong conclusion. According to what I've read about Napoleonic naval warfare splinters were up to a foot long and able to kill people instantly, although it was common that people were severely injured instead.

Try that test again with a long 32-pounder, maybe doubleshotted and fired against long oak-planks which are under tension.




GateCrusher420 VIP Member

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#74 11 years ago
MrFancypants;3717994They used the wrong testing-conditions so they arrived at a wrong conclusion. According to what I've read about Napoleonic naval warfare splinters were up to a foot long and able to kill people instantly, although it was common that people were severely injured instead. Try that test again with a long 32-pounder, maybe doubleshotted and fired against long oak-planks which are under tension.

You do have a point. The bigger the shell the more mass it has and the bigger the hole will be. You should post that on the mythbuster forum.




masked_marsoe VIP Member

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#75 11 years ago

I saw it on Friday, and it was as I expected. I don't know if I'll go to a fourth one (if any), because I don't think the series could sustain one more good movie.

The Locker scene was by far the best, but the plot overall skipped some bits it should have emphasised, and emphasised some bits it should have skipped.




Mad Cat

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#76 11 years ago

Afterburner;3717759Not true, the Mythbusters showed the splinters coming from the impact of a cannonball are not deadly at all unless you are incredibly unlucky and one maybe hits you in the jugular. The way to take out a ship would be by either smashing it's hull so badly that you take out all of it's guns or by aiming for the masts and riggings and taking those out. In reality unless you hit under the water level or it is really wavy and you smash enough holes the ship will never sink.[/quote] Mythbusters is a TV show, it can never be 100% real...

[quote=MrFancypants;3717720]Wooden ships take water all the time anyway. Shotholes were usually plugged and water pumped out. More critical are hits below the waterline that can occur when your ship is hit on the swell.

I know, very angerous when you put a wooden ship in the water after the winter because the joints (no pun) between the wooden pieces are still too dry, we nearly sank that way once... Because the Bilge pump didn't work. :p

But if the ship is hit above waterline, it can break other wooden pieces of which i do not know the proper english term for, the hole can keep expanding if the water puts pressure on it, that way going under the waterline. And if it gets to the waterline you can really forget it because there is great pressure then, especially when you have some speed, and especially if your ship weighs as much as those ones :p