Suspension of Disbelief 2 replies

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I didn't make it!

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#1 8 years ago

I'm not entirely sure what the best "gauge" for this would be, but I'm wondering how well everyone handles suspension of disbelief regarding works of fiction?

For example I'm a big fan of S.M. Stirling's "The Change" series in which gun powder, electricity, and internal combustion engines cease to function. Obviously this is a huge jump, but because the "cause" of this isn't the focus of the story I can pretty easily hand wave it aside and just enjoy the story. However, I know several people who just found the idea too silly and wrote the series off for the reason.

I guess the best way to gauge this would be to just give a good example of where suspension of disbelief just falls apart for you.

For me it is usually about internal coherence rather then making sense with the real world. The world created in a work of fiction just needs to be consistent with itself for me to just step out of myself and enjoy it. Other then that I don't care if people trample all over the laws of physics while writing a story.




Museum

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28th October 2005

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#2 8 years ago

If the story is well written and engaging, then I can enjoy it regardless of unexplained, seemingly impossible occurrences, like you said. I'll draw the line if nothing gets explained, for example if every few pages another strange thing is assumed without explanation.




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

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#3 8 years ago

Afterburner;5242897

For me it is usually about internal coherence rather then making sense with the real world. The world created in a work of fiction just needs to be consistent with itself for me to just step out of myself and enjoy it. Other then that I don't care if people trample all over the laws of physics while writing a story.

This is indeed the most important, although I do get annoyed by things that are so obviously wrong and impossible. Or at the very leat I got to chuckle a bit over common errors (such as in the case of movies or games: sound in the void of space). But if the story is well written and coherent I will most likely buy it and accept any things that aren't quite realstic or factual.

From time to time I do tend to enjoy taking things too seriously and noting all the obvious and less obvious flaws. It can be quite entertaining although it stops you wrom being sucked into the story, your disbelieve not being suspended. But ti's all about entertainment in the end, so...