17.IX.1939-stabbed in the back -1 reply

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H2HSnake

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5th June 2003

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#1 12 years ago

17.September.1939 # (The Soviets invaded Eastern Poland on September 17, 1939, dividing the country into two halves in a deal with the German Reich and promptly began deporting citizens to Siberia, beginning with prisoners of war).On 17 September the Red Army marched its troops into Poland that Soviet Union now claimed to be non-existing anymore. Also, the concerns about the Soviets' own security were stated to justify the invasion.The Red Army advance was coordinated with the movement of the German forces and met little resistance from the Polish forces, who were ordered by Sikorski to avoid engagement into the armed fights with the Soviets although some fight between Soviet and Hungarian units took place. 622px-Second_World_War_europe.PNG # According to documents signed by Stalin and his senior staff and revealed to the world by Mikhail Gorbachev, the Soviets condemned to death some 22,000 captured Polish officers, militia and police for the crime of being dangerous to the Soviet State. Most of these men (and women) were murdered in and around the forests of Katyn in early 1940.The mass graves were later discovered by the Germans but the British and American governments, by then allied with the Soviets, ignored the massacre. The largest grave contained 800 bodies. Grave sites of mass murders continue to be uncovered. # Deported Poles in Siberia and those languishing in Soviet jails were officially freed by the Soviet dictator shortly after the German invasion of the Soviet Union in the summer of 1941. Due to the need for slave labour, many camps were reluctant to let their Polish prisoners go and did everything they could to stop them. Of those who could get away, many of them (men, women and children including many orphans) headed south to escape the Soviets and join the Polish Army being formed on Soviet soil. This army would later become known as the Polish Second Corps which fought under the British 8th Army in Italy. Many of those who could not get away in time, joined the Soviet army and fought in Polish units against the Germans on the eastern front. # Polish soldiers, citizens and refugees were devastated when the British and American leaders handed over post war control of Poland to Stalin, the Soviet dictator who had invaded their country. He assembled a puppet government from amongst Polish communists while the true Polish government in Exile in London was excluded. # The Polish Armed Forces in the West remained poised and ready to boot the Soviets out of Poland as late as 1945. However the British government, tired of war and anxious not to upset Stalin, demobilized them instead. Even worse, following protests by Stalin, they did not allow these allied soldiers to participate in London's Victory parade.




H2HSnake

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#2 12 years ago

Soviet Occupation of Poland 1939 THE SOVIET INVASION OF POLAND DURING WORLD WAR TWO http://felsztyn.tripod.com/id15.html

This page provides an overview of the first stages of the invasion of Poland and examples of Soviet atrocities committed during the invasion in September of 1939 and in the months that followed. http://felsztyn.tripod.com/id18.html




H2HSnake

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#3 12 years ago

A quote from the above link concerning Soviet invasion "OVERVIEW OF THE INVASION OF POLAND BY SOVIET TROOPS IN SEPTEMBER 1939 (from the book Wojna Polsko-Sowiecka 1939). It is commonly assumed by scholars in the West that there was no or only token resistance to the Soviet invasion by Polish troops on and after September 17, 1939. This book will show that the assumption is incorrect. Active Polish armed resistance, in some sectors, persisted up until the 1st of October, 1939. First, it must be noted that Poland and the Soviet Union had previously signed a non-aggression pact. This pact was obviously broken by the Soviets. Moreover, the Soviets then proceeded to sign a secret deal with the German Reich (the Ribbentrop-Molotov treaty of August 23, 1939) to divide Poland between them. The treachery here is obvious. When the Soviets attacked, taking the Poles by surprise, almost all Polish troops were engaged in a mortal fight, entering into its seventeenth day, with the German aggressor. Most of the combat divisions were already badly weakened, partially encircled by the highly motorized enemy, or even destroyed. Polish troops in the hinterland, where Soviet troops attacked, comprised one brigade and seven weakly-armed regiments of the Border Protection Corps (KOP) and some regular troops, but mostly reserves in the process of accelerated training, to be sent, as quickly as possible, to the German front; skeleton garrisons in cities and towns; units routed by the Germans trying to reorganize; supply units, field hospitals, etc. There was, therefore, no possibility of creating a regular front against the Soviet aggressors, who pushed forward with dozens of divisions, including a few thousand tanks. On September 17, 1939 the Polish High Command was located at Kolomyja, south-east of Lwow, close to the friendly Romanian border. When the first news of the Soviet aggression was broken, it received urgent requests from different commanders by radio, telegraph and telephone as to how to behave. These requests, and the confusion which reigned initially in some places, resulted to a great extent from the fact that Soviet troops, perfidiously masking their real intentions, often waved white flags, shouted "At the Germans!", saluted Polish soldiers, etc. Many Poles were, therefore, initially under the illusion that the Soviets may have decided to intervene against Germany. The first orders from the High Command were "fight!" But some hours later, assessing the general tragic situation that had emerged, the Polish Commander-in-Chief, Marshal Smigly-Ridz, arrived at the conclusion that instead of waging a hopeless war against the invading Soviets, the best solution would be to save as many troops as possible for continued action in France. In this connection he issued the following "general directive": "The Soviets have entered. I order general withdrawl to Romania and Hungary by the shortest routes. No fighting with the Bolsheviks, only in case of attack by them or attempts to disarm units. The tasks of Warsaw and of cities that have had to defend themselves against the Germans - without change." While access routes to Romania were cut off, by the Soviets, already by September 19/20, those to Hungary, situated further to the West, remained open a few days longer, and so 70 - 80,000 Polish troops managed to enter these countries (thousands of additional individual soldiers and volunteers crossed into Hungary during the following months, until the defeat of France). Prominent among the units that crossed in September was one of the two existing Polish motorized brigades, fighting on the day of Soviet aggression against Germans in the vicinity of Lwow (commanded by then Col., later Gen. Stanislaw Maczek, 1892 - 1994) and the rest of the Polish Air Force, some hundred planes, and a considerable number of motorized ground personnel. These men were to become the backbone of the Polish armoured division that took part in the invasion of France in 1944, and the Polish Air Force that played a considerable role in the Battle of Britain. Obviously, because of the distances, the continued fighting with the Germans, and the Soviets doing their best to prevent the exodus, it could only embrace a relatively small portion of the Polish troops, mostly from the southern sector of Poland. Troops in the northern sector, fairly small in number, partially fighting with the Soviets, finally crossed the border into Lithuania, but some into Latvia; some did not cross until September 25/26. Many of the interned servicemen were quickly able to reach, via Sweden, the Polish Army formed in France. Finally, all the troops in the central sector fought the Soviets the longest, up to October 1, 1939. They were finally dispersed or had to capitulate, partially to the Germans. In sum, between September 17 and October 1, 1939, there were a number of battles, and dozens of skirmishes, between Polish and Soviet troops. And almost everywhere along the extended Polish-Soviet border of almost 1,500 kilometres, KOP offered at least preliminary resistance during September 17/18. Later, partisan activities in some of the Soviet-occupied territories followed. More specifically, there existed a fierce defence of the city of Grodno (September 20-21), in which some 800 Soviets were killed or wounded, and at least 10 of their tanks destroyed. Prior to that there had been rear-guard fighting by military units and volunteers in Wilno on the evening and during the night of September 18/19. Then came the battle of Kodziowce (September 22) , where a Polish regiment, belonging to the group commanded by Gen. Waclaw Przezdziecki, repelled all attacks by forty Soviet tanks and strong infantry units; Soviet losses in this region amounted to hundreds of killed and some 20 tanks destroyed. Further south, in the region of Polesie, there was heavy fighting of the KOP Regiment "Sarny" which, based on its modern fortification and supported by a heavily-armed armoured train, was able to defend the state border for 3 to 4 days (September 17/18 - 19/20), inflicting heavy casualties on the attacking Soviets. To avoid being encircled, the "Sarny" Regiment later withdrew in order, joining the KOP Brigade "Polesie". The Group, led by Gen. Wilhelm Orlik-Ruckemann, and counting at one point over 7,000 men, withdrew westwards, covering 450 kilometres, and fighting against Soviet troops and the Communist "fifth column". During that march, the town of Ratno was taken from Communist hands (September 27), and a victorious battle was fought against Soviet troops at Szack (September 28). Finally, the River Bug was crossed into central Poland and there, after the battle of Wytyczno (October 1), when ammunition was running short, Gen. Ruckemann, instead of capitulating, ordered the dispersal of his troops. In sum, the Group destroyed some 20 Soviet tanks. In the same region of Polesie, and later on the left bank of the River Bug, there operated the Group "Polesie", commanded by General Franciszek Kleeberg, counting at one point some 17,000 men. Between September 18/19 and 30, 1939, its combat was exclusively with Soviet troops (and Communist guerillas). One of its divisions fought two victorious battles against them at Puchowa Gora and Jablon (September 29) and Milanow (September 30). In the latter the enemy lost over 100 killed. During the days that followed, the Kleeberg group fought against the Germans; after a successful battle at Kock, but with ammunition almost gone, it capitulated on October 5, 1939. As this was the big unit that fought for the longest period of time against the Germans, it was revered in the censored (i.e. post-war Communist) Polish literature, with careful omission, of course, of its fighting with the Soviets. In the northern part of Volhynia, the 3rd KOP Regiment, withdrawing to the west, took by assault the town of Kolki, but was later, while trying to cross the river Stochod, confronted by overwhelming Soviet troops. In the battle that followed at the Borowicze-Hruziatyn-Nawoz triangle, the Soviets suffered heavy losses in killed and wounded, and a number of their tanks were destroyed. Finally, though, the Poles had to surrender on September 22nd. Considerable fighting also took place, on September 24-25th, at Husynne, in the Zamosc region. Finally, even in the southern sector there was fighting with Soviet troops. Thus the KOP Regiment "Podole", apart from numerous smaller encounters along the border, defended the line of the Dniestr River until the evening of September 17, when the crucial bridge over it at Uscieczko was blown up by Polish troops. There were two clashes of Polish and Soviet armoured forces - one at Nizniow, on the river Dniestr, on September 17th; the second at Krasne, to the east of Lwow, on September 19th or 20th. On September 26/27, a group of Polish cavalry regiments, commanded by Gen. Wladyslaw Anders and already mauled by the Germans during the previous weeks of fighting, was attacked by Soviet cavalry and tanks in the vicinity of Sambor, while trying to reach the Hungarian border to the South. There was fighting, and a number of Soviet tanks were destroyed. But finally most of the Polish group was encircled, and the order was given to the troops to disperse. Only a few managed to reach Hungary in small groups. General Anders was among those captured by the Soviets. Two regiments capitulated on September 28 to the Germans. According to Molotov in his speech to the Supreme Soviet on October 31, 1939, Soviet losses during the "liberation of Western Byelorussia and Western Ukraine" were originally set at 737 killed and 1862 wounded. More recent Russian publications quote numbers as high as 5,327 men killed and wounded in action. It is quite possible that the real number may be as high as 7,000 to 10,000. "

It's info thread,so if You don't want to read just- don't do it (it's simple),before You post "OMG another Poland thread" just go for a walk or browse another threads and leave it be.




Polska

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19th September 2004

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#4 12 years ago

I'll post here just for the sake of preventing you from making more posts after eachother :P

I already know most the information here, so there's nothing new for me; but it's nice to see somone going trough all the effort to post this and to make other people who don't know aware of this.




czech speacial forces

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#5 12 years ago

never trust the russians russia stabed poland in the back then got their asses kicked by germany, so they didnt gain much from invading poland. maybe even made it worse for them.:uhm:




H2HSnake

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#6 12 years ago
czech speacial forcesnever trust the russians russia stabed poland in the back then got their asses kicked by germany, so they didnt gain much from invading poland. maybe even made it worse for them.:uhm:

don't forget that later germans were kicked by russians out of their country,out of Poland and..out of germany :] and russians got whole Poland under control :| as a gift from Churchil and Roosevelt..so actually they've won the war.




IcarianVX

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#7 12 years ago

Interesting. Learn something new everyday. This is one of the better things to learn.




Polska

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#8 12 years ago
H2HSnakedon't forget that later germans were kicked by russians out of their country,out of Poland and..out of germany :] and russians got whole Poland under control :| as a gift from Churchil and Roosevelt..so actually they've won the war.

Very tragic but true, Poland could be placed amongs the ones of those who really lost the war. ( along with countries like East Germany and other countries that weren't keen on falling underneath Soviet Reign )




Taranov

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29th April 2003

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#9 12 years ago

Two words for Mr. Churchill

Chapter the eighteenth. Munich winter

On 30 September Czechoslovakia was inclined before the Munich solutions. "we want, said Czechs, - to state before entire peace about their protest against the solutions, in which we did not participate".

President Benes left into the resignation because "he could prove to be interference with the course of events, to which must be adapted our new state". Benes left from Czechoslovakia and found refuge to England. The breakdown of Czechoslovak state occurred in accordance with the agreement. However, Germans were not the only predators, that tore to pieces the corpse of Czechoslovakia. Immediately after the conclusion of the Munich agreement on 30 September Polish government directed to Czech government the ultimatum, to which she was necessary to give the answer after 24 hours. Polish government required immediate transfer to it the boundary region Of teshin. Not there was possibility whatever to resist to this rough requirement.

The heroic traits of the nature of Polish people must not force us to shut the eyes to his rashness and ingratitude, [ 146 ] which during a number it is age-long they caused to it immeasurable sufferings. In 1919 this was the country, which the victory of allies after many generations of division and servitude converted into the independent republic and one of the main European powers. Now, in 1938, because of this insignificant question as Teshin, Poles broke with all their friends in France, in England and in THE USA, which returned them to the united national life and in aid of which they had to soon so strongly require. We saw how now, until the reflection of the might of Germany fell on them, they hurried to take their portion with the plunder and the destruction to Czechoslovakia. All doors were closed at the moment of crisis for the English and French ambassadors. Them they did not allow even to the Polish Minister of Foreign Affairs. It is necessary to consider secret and tragedy of European history the fact that people, capable to any heroism, whose individual representatives are talented, valiant, charming, it constantly manifests such enormous deficiencies almost in all aspects of its state life. Glory in the periods of mutinies and grief; infamy and disgrace in the periods of triumph. The brave of the brave too frequently led most infamous of the infamous! And nevertheless always there were two Poland: one of them fought for the truth, and another crept in the meanness.

For us still one must describe about the failure of their war builds up and plans; on haughtiness and errors of their policy; on the terrible slaughter houses and the deprivations, to which they doomed themselves by their folly. However, we will always find in them the eternal tendency to fight with the tyranny and the readiness to transfer all tortures, which they on themselves eternally draw with the amazing hardness.

dif_04.jpg Greetings to Red Army, liberators of Western Ukraine and western Belorussia!

It's not my words, it's words on the banner. Stop rape history, guys, stop rape history...




Polska

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#10 12 years ago

Don't take me wrong Taranov, I am not trying to glorify Poland's history against the rest of the world. Poland has had it's share in causing pain and destruction as much as any other country in the world has.