Concrete Armor -1 reply

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Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#1 12 years ago

Hi kids,

someone brought up concrete armor in a parallel thread, so Uncle Fuzzy decided to do a bit of research. Unfortunately, there's not much publicly available information on the topic, so this really goes to show that Uncle Fuzzy loves you! Initially, I dug up this:

http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=89973

Basically, to thieve a few of their photos, there are numerous examples of concrete or log armor fitted to tanks, including this Italian armored train:

libliincantiereansaldo.jpg

(In the process of which, I found this Italian-language gem about Bersaglieri in WWII -- http://digilander.libero.it/lacorsainfinita/ as well as this great Italian page about various Italian units and vehicles, http://digilander.libero.it/avantisavoiait/ but back to the topic)

Point is that in 1943, under the auspices of the NIIBT tank proving center, inventor N. Tsuganov tested two T-34s with "alternative" armor, including one with a sheet iron body and sand as primary armor mass, the other with ferroconcrete:

T-34GB.JPG

There's apparently a Russian book called "Domestic Armored Vehicles" or something (translation from babelfish, sorry, can't do better); in volume two this is described. Maybe Taranov or someone knows this best.

In any case, it was found that mobility was reduced by up to 40%, weight, wear and tear were also increased beyond what was usable. The project was canned.

Boy, that was anticlimactic, wasn't it?

From armchairgeneral.com, I also found this snippet:

[INDENT]For the infantry that met the Russian heavy tanks, a German infantry officer pointed out from his unit's first experience near Staraia Rusa. "There we met the KVII and the first T-34. We had close combat and used material from the engineers, mostly mines, and all soldiers were trained in the antitank use of these mines. Also we had in all rifle companies special troops of two or thee soldiers who worked together. One man handled security and a second operated on the blind side of the tank with a mine and tried either to place the mine on the tank's rear hatch or use a hand grenade bundle (held with wire) thrown over the tank barrel. A third method involved using a shape charge, which was magnetic, emplaced against the tank. But the Russians then countered this by placing concrete on the armor plate so the mines would not stick. They mixed the cement with paint and simply painted it on." [/INDENT]Next up, an article on the Soviet KV-series heavy tanks, including the KV-7 turretless tank, and other beauties:

kv7_02.jpg




FlyGuy45

*TRA* Spsk. Pilotka VVS

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22nd June 2005

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#2 12 years ago

I was just thinking of concrete tanks. Intresting stuff, should *try* to find that book.




Real-BadSeed

Science experiment

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5th December 2004

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#3 12 years ago

has anyone made a rubber tank that lets shells bounce off?




Lupin

[¹2ACR]

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26th July 2004

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#4 12 years ago
FuzzyBunnysomeone brought up concrete armor in a parallel thread

:D. Good work Fuzz.




roterschnee

Vorwärts Kameraden!

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8th January 2005

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#5 12 years ago

53103308.jpg

Concrete reinforcements on a Finnish StuG added in summer 1944.




Carroarmato-P40

Believe, Obey, Fight!

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12th July 2005

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#6 12 years ago

I was under the impression most StuG's and Jagdpanzers, Jagdpanthers and Jagdtigers had a simular set up with concrete reinforcement near the front of the turrent, close to the rear-end of the barrel, somewhat near to the breech.




roterschnee

Vorwärts Kameraden!

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8th January 2005

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#7 12 years ago

The mantlet is steel, the smooth areas either side are concrete.