English Culture -1 reply

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Komrad_B

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2nd September 2004

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#1 13 years ago

Hey, I am trying to find a subject for my final oral presentation in my english class, but I don't know what to take. I must do something about an aspect of english (not only from england, but from an english speaking country) and i'd like to hear what you guys can suggest me. Remember, it can be anything as long as it is more or less tied to the english culture. Those helping me will all get a nice cookie like that : ( :: )




NoCoolOnesLeft

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19th November 2003

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#2 13 years ago

Well, ok. Seeing as this is in the FH Off Topic forum, how about a report on the British public's reaction to World War Two?

Just an idea, but you could put a lot of effective things in a topic like that; accounts, quotes, emotive language etc. It's tied to the English culture because as a nation, it has its own specific view and opinion.




Komrad_B

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#3 13 years ago

Could be a good idea.. And it would be original, also. I suppose i should give you your cookie : ( :: ) :D




GunsOfBrixton29

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#4 13 years ago

Pubs.




Sputty

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#5 13 years ago

Overly broad question. English culture, from England, is difficult to define, but including all English speaking countries makes it insane Britain(all the countries of the British isles), U.S.A, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the continuing growth of it and how it's becoming dominant. Too many topics for one report under 10000 words




Komrad_B

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#6 13 years ago

Its about a single aspect of it. Not about all of the english culture. But its not my fault, its beacause of my teacher.




Sputty

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#7 13 years ago

I guess easiest one to do would probably it's growth as the closest thing to a world language ever. That would be pretty easy, because it affects itself and other languages, cultures it would be easy to find info. For example, Quebec is using an archaic form of french basically to try to "defend" against English speaking and is willing to go to extreme measures, also France outlawed the term e-mail and adopted a french version.




Komrad_B

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#8 13 years ago
Sputty For example, Quebec is using an archaic form of french basically to try to "defend" against English speaking and is willing to go to extreme measures, also France outlawed the term e-mail and adopted a french version.

What? We in Quebec are using an archaic form of french? We are speaking french better than the french themselves! Damn they even use the word "escalator" (prunounced with a very distinct french accent) to talk about an "escalier roulant". At least in Quebec we say english words with an english accent when we use them. But its true we are also very protective about our language, but I won't say our french is "arcaic"!!. We used old french not too long ago, but our french now is much better than before because of the reforms in education during the '70s. Of course our insults are still very distinct.




Sputty

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#9 13 years ago

ar·cha·ic ( P ) Pronunciation Key (är-kk) also ar·cha·i·cal (--kl) adj. also Archaic Of, relating to, or characteristic of a much earlier, often more primitive period, especially one that develops into a classical stage of civilization: an archaic bronze statuette; Archaic Greece. No longer current or applicable; antiquated: archaic laws. See Synonyms at old. Of, relating to, or characteristic of words and language that were once in regular use but are now relatively rare and suggestive of an earlier style or period. Not trying to offend, but compared to other spoken french, Quebec french in a lot of ways is archaic. It's failed to evolve as it was defended, in a way hurting it's own ability to grow. Evolution of language is what makes a language survive English has consistently changed since it's creation, and french also did at one time. French used to be the current equivalent to English but since has grown out of that role and it hasn't changed as much as most languages do. The English language uses plenty of french terms also, although many of them existed in English for hundreds of years. Quebec french, compared to most french, is old. Archaic is often attributed negatively but it's the right word. The reason is the defense of it has slowed it down. France is starting to do the same thing though, so it won't be long until "main" french is also at a dead end. Whatever, just do it on the growth of the language and it'll be easy. And the french in France will never not use their accents, no matter how arrogant it looks or how ill-fitting it is(Imagine a thick accented texan speaking french,*shudder*)




Komrad_B

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#10 13 years ago

Ok, i thought you meant Arcaic as an insult :). Humm Quebec french is more and more looking like the international french. The language as changed much in a very short time. Of course we can still speak "joual" (traditional quebec french) and i can give you an example of that : Aille Roger, quesse qu'tu d'vient? L'aut' jour eh'j'tai déscendus un osti d'gros ours dans e'l bois, t'aurions même po crus sa. En tka. Aille eh'j'te dit qu'ses pomal platte ces temps cite. Y fa frete qu'el calisse pis on s'gèle e'l cul à pus finir.