If you know German, please help! -1 reply

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Hayes

Oi me mackies

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23rd May 2004

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#1 11 years ago

I'm completely lost on how to formal, and non-formal commands... I need 5 formal, and 5 non-formal for a German paper. I need your help! Could you translate these, or at least tell me the rules for the Sie, Du, and Ihr forms? It's do tommorow so please don't try and get on my last nerve >.< I need to demostrate how to kick an American Football 1. Pick up the football! 2. Turn the football so the laces are towards you! 3. Place the ball down on the Tee! 4. Make sure the laces are facing you! 5. Take three steps back! 6. Lift up your hand! 7.Take 3 steps forward! 8. Dip your foot downwards, and come up under the ball. 9. Make contact with your foot! 10. Follow through! Please help me...thanks.




FlyGuy45

*TRA* Spsk. Pilotka VVS

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22nd June 2005

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#2 11 years ago

I don't speak much German, but I know Du is formal, and I think Sie is neuter, and ihr informal. In Spanish, you would do this: Bailar--Bailo--Biale(n). Instead of "I dance" I change -an to -en and "I want you to dance."(Or something like that)




Moose12

I am also [130.Pz]Gef.Elche Pz

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6th December 2005

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#3 11 years ago

He doesn't need spanish lol. By the way pilotka spanish is Tu=informal, usted= formal. This baile, baila stuff is wrong lol. Baile is subjunctive.




Hayes

Oi me mackies

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23rd May 2004

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#4 11 years ago

You can help!




Mad Ewok

You suck at life

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17th January 2005

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#5 11 years ago

Sie is the formal version (usually when talking to someone you don't know), whereas du is informal (like you would use du with a friend and someone you're closer with), and ihr usually is moreso plural. Not 100% sure of ihr, the said part is I'm in German now. But I am sure of the other two.




MrMushr00m

silent reader

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8th August 2006

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#6 11 years ago

yes you are right, Sie is the formal version, you use it with persons you call by the surname or you dont know. Du for persons you are on first-name terms. Ihr is only used for kings, emperors and so on... very ouddated

but dont forget that you can use Ihr as plural for you and Sie as she




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#7 11 years ago

Important: "Ihr" is informal first person plural, like a group of friends. "Sie" is formal first person plural, like a group of police officers about to arrest you for being drunk and disorderly and peeing on the mayor's car right in front of the town hall, not like that would ever happen.

In some countries (Switzerland, Austria), "Ihr" for first person formal is still used, just to confuse you more.




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#8 11 years ago

After reading these Forums for months, you finally made me creating an account.

Here you go: (formal) 1. Heben sie den Football auf! 2. Drehen sie den Football mit der Naht zu sich. 3. Legen sie den Ball auf das Tee vor sich. 4. Stellen sie sicher, dass die Naht zu ihnen zeigt! 5. Treten sie fünf Schritte zurück! (informal) 6. Hebe die Hand hoch! 7. Gehe drei Schritte vor! (Nimm drei Schritte Anlauf!) 8. Strecke den Fuss nach unten und komme von unten an den Ball! 9. Stelle Fusskontakt her! (Strange sentence, you wouldnt say this) Rather: 8+9: Strecke den Fuss nach unten und trete von unten gegen den Ball! 10. Wiederholen.




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#9 11 years ago

Don't forget to make sure you're SHOUTING while saying these, and STOMPING AROUND and GENERALLY BEING LOUD.

Having a disdainful look on your face helps.




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#10 11 years ago

That reminds me: I personally would not use those exclamation marks. After all, you seem to be instructing a gym class and not shouting orders in a boot camp. The stomping is obligatory, though.