Memorial Day -1 reply

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[130pz.]Kading

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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9th April 2005

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#1 12 years ago

''From time to time, the tree of liberty must be watered by the blood of tyrants and patriots.'' -Thomas Jefferson When you are BBQing or hanging out with your buddies enjoying a day off from work or school, take a moment to remember who made those things possible and what this day represents. We must never forget the sacrifice of the men and women who have faught for democracy on far away soil, sand, ice and sea. These brave souls will never again walk among us, but they live on in the hearts of every American. Long live the Republic! Kading




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#2 12 years ago

Yeah! International Workers of the World, Unite!

Erm...*looks around*

uh, no, that was beginning of this month, wasn't it.




MR.X`

I'm too cool to Post

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30th April 2004

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#3 12 years ago

Fuzzy, not appropriate.

Well, Memorial Day of 2006 has come and gone. The hot dogs and hamburgers have been eaten. Swimming pools have by now opened for the first time this season. And who could forget a day without school or work? It seems these days most people forget the true meaning of this day. It is far too easy to cast aside the memory of our country's finest in the face of a day off. Being so, I ask each one of you to just spend one minute thinking about those who have served, or who are serving, in our armed forces. Think about the hell they have gone through so that we can be free, something very few men can rightfully say they are. Just think about this, for example. 18 and 19 year old boys, not much older (or younger) than most of you, are fighting and dying so that some poor family has a new chance at life. They don't fight for land or money, like many soldiers have in the history of man. They don't fight because somebody told them to, also like many fighting men of the past. The American serviceman takes up arms to guard the freedom of his fellow man, regardless of nationality, religion, race, or gender. Remember the men buried at the Tomb of the Unknowns, "known but to God", who died for their friends, their loved ones, and their comrades. Those who fought gallantly, but whose name we shall never know. Remember the men and women buried at Arlington National Cemetary, who dedicated their lives to upholding the values of the Declaration of Independence and the Bill of Rights. Remember the men and women buried at Colleville-sur-Mer, among other locations, who gave their lives so that the people of Europe could be free of tyrannical oppression. Fighting for those whom you do not know, dying for the cause of liberty and justice, are among the most honorable things a man can do. In short, may we never forget what our bravest and finest young men and women have done for both our country and the world. In the words of one historian (whose name escapes me, I believe it was Max Hasaings), in World War II the "German soldier was feared, the Russian soldier was reviled, the American soldier was welcomed and loved."

http://forums.filefront.com/showpost.php?p=2891202&postcount=1




oscar989

http://www.forgottenhonor.com/

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4th April 2005

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#4 12 years ago

The soldier believes in the flag, the soldier fights for the flag, the soldier dies under the flag, the soldier is draped with the flag when incoffined, and it is because of the soldiers death that the civilian has the right to burn the flag.:flag: :salute:




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#5 12 years ago

Define "not appropriate." I am cynically opposed to the lies, the disingenuous propaganda that in many cases lead naive young men and women to die for artificial causes and for realpolitik that callously claims to stand for them and their interests.

I respect the poor bastards who fought and died for false ideals, and four something as idiotic as "flags" and "countries", but I can't think of more than a handful of wars since 1945 that I find justified in any sense of the word.

If we're going to quote hyperpatriotic claptrap, Yeh, some folks inherit star spangled eyes, ooh, they send you down to war, Lord, And when you ask them, how much should we give, oh, they only answer, more, more, more, yoh, It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no military son, SON, NO It ain't me, it ain't me, I ain't no fortunate one, NO NO




Lupin

[¹2ACR]

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26th July 2004

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#6 12 years ago
FuzzyBunnybut I can't think of more than a handful of wars since 1945 that I find justified in any sense of the word.

Ditto. But anyhow, may the soldiers rest in peace.




LOZZY

Whitty user title pending...

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19th April 2006

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#7 12 years ago

that was very nicely written fuzzy I agree 100% but yeah Rest in peace




Bikewer

Dread pwns me!

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17th October 2003

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#8 12 years ago

One of the more touching bits I heard over the weekend was surprisingly from Garrison Kiellor and the Prarie Home Companion radio show. You may be aware that Kiellor is one of those dreadful liberals who is always poking fun at Dubya. However, in honor of Memorial day, he read/sung a letter from a WWII vet that had been set to music. Halfway through, you could hear him start to loose it, and he had to stop for a second. Then, at the conclusion, the audience (recorded at Wolf Trap) all sand the Star Spangled Banner. Quite a moment.




jumjum

Write heavy; write hard.

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11th April 2005

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#9 12 years ago
BikewerOne of the more touching bits I heard over the weekend was surprisingly from Garrison Kiellor and the Prarie Home Companion radio show. You may be aware that Kiellor is one of those dreadful liberals who is always poking fun at Dubya. However, in honor of Memorial day, he read/sung a letter from a WWII vet that had been set to music. Halfway through, you could hear him start to loose it, and he had to stop for a second. Then, at the conclusion, the audience (recorded at Wolf Trap) all sand the Star Spangled Banner. Quite a moment.

It was taken from "And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda", a song about the ANZACS at Gallipoli, and Keillor likely wrote the new lyric appropriate to Memorial Day. But I agree that Keillor was struggling with the song and its meaning. That's all the more remarkable because in the last several years Keillor (I've listened to and read him since the early '80's) has become so cynical and single-mindedly partisan that he hardly ever misses a chance to take a bitter swipe at those he hates. So it's unusual that he didn't try to twist it into a political diatribe and just played it straight.

Oh, and as to the Wolftrap audience applauding, Keillor always knows where he is. Such unabashed patriotic sentiment would draw embarrssed shuffling in Madison, Minneapolis or NYC, and he wouldn't dare do it there. But at Wolftrap there would have been enough military types that the usual Keillor New Yorker crowd would be shamed into acting like they thought it was just hunky-dory.




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#10 12 years ago

I think what the flag-wavers need is a little less flag and a little more

marines.jpg “See the people in the windows? They’ll sit right there in the plane, watching those Marines. You gotta wonder what’s going through their minds, knowing that they’re on the plane that brought him home. They’re going to remember being on that plane for the rest of their lives. They’re going to remember bringing that Marine home. And they should.” * Picture: Todd Heisler, The Rocky Mountain News. Quote: Major Steve Beck, USMC. I hope that made everyone's day.