Religion and the German soldier -1 reply

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Siberian Soldier

Where's my steel coffin?

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30th May 2005

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#1 12 years ago

I've read numerous books on WWII and the German soldier. While they make remarks about religion they never mention what demonination the German soldier belong to. It doesn't matter to me one way or the other, I'm only curious. Were the German soldiers influenced towards one demonination? Did they discriminate against certain religions? I'm currently reading "In Deadly Combat" a German soldier's memoir of the eastern front written by Gottlob Herbert Bidermann. It makes mention of having a chaplain and attending services but thats all it mentions. Anyone know?




snotvod

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26th May 2005

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#2 12 years ago

I suppose they would either be Roman Katholics or Lutherian Protestants. Nazism was against religion, but since the common footsoldier was just serving his country, he was still religious.




oscar989

http://www.forgottenhonor.com/

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4th April 2005

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#3 12 years ago

I thought the Nazis were actually very much into the Celtic type of beliefs?




rednas

I post to get attention

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18th January 2006

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#4 12 years ago

The soldiers of the SS Handschar (it was named different) were muslims.




Polska

"The original one"

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19th September 2004

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#5 12 years ago

Didn't Hitler believe in the ocult and went on a search for items like the spear of destiny?




Lupin

[ยน2ACR]

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26th July 2004

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#6 12 years ago
polskaDidn't Hitler believe in the ocult and went on a search for items like the spear of destiny?

Yes.




Mr_Cheese

FH Dev

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12th June 2004

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#7 12 years ago

Didn't the Heer (army) belt buckle have "Gott mit uns" (God with us) written on it?




Bikewer

Dread pwns me!

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17th October 2003

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#8 12 years ago

Those buckles were available from a variety of memorabilia shops back when I was in Germany in the 60s.

The average soldier was likely to be Christian, either Catholic or Lutheran. Both sects were common in Germany. (my Grandparents were German catholics, and there was a heavy influx into the St. Louis area back in the 20s.)

The buisness about the occult and an invented mythology were much more along the lines of a propaganda effort in service of National Socialism. Hitler had his "guys" write up a German mythology that drew on old myths and story cycles (the very same that Tolkien took the LOTR from...)and put it together with his notions of Aryan supremecy. It was believed that Hitler was superstitious, and into astrology; this resulted in some odd espionage efforts on the part of the Allies. By most accounts, Hitler's belief in these things was rather more of convenience than conviction.




Toekar

Proud to be American

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21st August 2005

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#9 12 years ago

I would think it was a personal thing.




jumjum

Write heavy; write hard.

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11th April 2005

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#10 12 years ago

BikewerThose buckles were available from a variety of memorabilia shops back when I was in Germany in the 60s.

The average soldier was likely to be Christian, either Catholic or Lutheran. Both sects were common in Germany. (my Grandparents were German catholics, and there was a heavy influx into the St. Louis area back in the 20s.)

The buisness about the occult and an invented mythology were much more along the lines of a propaganda effort in service of National Socialism. Hitler had his "guys" write up a German mythology that drew on old myths and story cycles (the very same that Tolkien took the LOTR from...)and put it together with his notions of Aryan supremecy. It was believed that Hitler was superstitious, and into astrology; this resulted in some odd espionage efforts on the part of the Allies. By most accounts, Hitler's belief in these things was rather more of convenience than conviction.

"Gott Mit Uns" IIRC was a motto used since at least Kaiser Wilhelm II's time.

As to the religion and "religiousity" of German soldiers, I'm stepping out of my depth, but it's my impression that German soldiers expressing a preference were more often Catholic. (Was the Counter-Reformation so effective in the land of Martin Luther?)

An excellent analysis of Hitler's beliefs-of-convenience. An odd state religion which combined Nordic myth, paganism and astrology with Nazi philosophy and a just a touch of Christianity.




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