Rifle Research -1 reply

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_Hurricane_

Prepare for the Hurricane

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8th April 2006

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#1 12 years ago

Hi

I got a nice Rifle at home but I don't know what sort it is, it was my grandfathers and I belive he did some hunting in africa with it. I really want to know what rifle it is but I don't know where too start searching, my grandfather died before I knew him and nobody else knows.

Here are some pics I just did, maybe someone can help me :)

bild196co2.jpgbild175sr0.jpgbild179tf7.jpgbild192bm2.jpgbild194hz1.jpg

Got some more pics if you want. :cya:




snotvod

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26th May 2005

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#2 12 years ago

It could be a Rubin straight-pull rifle which is a Swiss rifle, produced between 1911 and 1925.

http://world.guns.ru/rifle/rfl15-e.htm




_Hurricane_

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#3 12 years ago

Thx a lot, it is a Schmidt-Rubin K31, a swiss army rifle. It was used from 1933 - 1958 and about 530.000 were built.

I haven't got the Bayonet or any ammo but this rifle is beautiful, maybe oneday I can shoot it :)




Bikewer

Dread pwns me!

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17th October 2003

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#4 12 years ago

There were a couple of straight-pull designs, the Schmidt-Rubin was the best known; I believe there was a Vetterli as well.

Sort of an answer to a problem that didn't exist; most troops rapidly adapted to the Mauser-style bolt action. The difference in speed with a straight-pull was pretty minimal, and the design is much more complex.

Still, the Swiss (much like the Germans) built these things like fine watches; a nice piece. We used to still see them in the base "rod & gun" club when I was in Germany back in the 60s; they were selling for about 50.00.




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#5 12 years ago

That's not a Karabiner 31, that's a Langgewehr '08 (I think, on short analysis, as I think the K31 is a bit shorter and the mag on the 31 is closer to the trigger guard.) Hurricane, I have one of those. You can use standard Swiss army 7.5mm "Ordonnanz" ammo for it (5 francs for a box of 20 or something like that.) You're also allowed to fire it at any official rifle range, although you may need to join a club.

All Swiss army bolt-actions from the "Vetterligewehr" (I believe the official designation was Langgewehr '96 or some such) through the 1955 sniper (the K31 with some adaptations to the cartridge ejection mechanism) were straight-pull actions--very cool designs and an absolute incredible joy to shoot. Here's a page with more info;

http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/schmidt_rubin.html

Ask at a local range for their Jungschuetzensomethingorother. If you're in the Zurich area, we can go together when I'm back from South America. I have a Karabiner 31 as well, with bayonets for both rifles, cleaning supplies, etc. They are very very cheap to buy. If you get a chance, I recommend it, although if you're not in Switzerland, I suggest having it re-bored to NATO standard.

I recommend getting a nice bag for it (shouldn't run you more than 50.-) and taking it to a range on any day; there are always old guys there who will show you how to clean it, use it, etc. Just ask nicely and you'll usually find someone to help you with it. At the range I often go to, there's a 95 year old guy who goes to shoot his 1889/11 carbine regularly (although he nearly got kicked out for screwing around with it once :-)

You may also want to go to your local "Zeughaus" (armory) and buy some "Lederfett"--the Swiss army makes really good soap-like grease for the leather strap on it.




jumjum

Write heavy; write hard.

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11th April 2005

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#6 12 years ago

Bikewer, the older I get, the more I appreciate competence. It doesn't matter in what field, or how limited the scope. I just appreciate it when a person clearly knows what he's talking about. And that's why I enjoyed reading your post. Cheers. :beer:




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#7 12 years ago

I think you'd be surprised regarding the speed difference to a regular up-and-back bolt action. They're not _terribly_ more complicated (the only major difference being the spiral groove on the slide.)

Spot on about the engineering quality though. And like all the Swiss army surplus stuff you get, they're about as indestructible as it gets. Two thumbs up.




stylie

Mas stylie por favor...

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13th April 2005

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#8 12 years ago

I did a search on the serial number... It seems your granpop stole it from MY granpop. I'll be over tomorrow to collect. Thanks in advance for cleaning it!




jumjum

Write heavy; write hard.

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#9 12 years ago

It's a conspiracy I tells ya! Just as I am in the process of bragging on Bikewer for knowing his stuff, Fuzzy comes in and does one of his patented omni-informational fly-bys. Impressive, Grasshopper. Per usual.




_Hurricane_

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8th April 2006

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#10 12 years ago

FuzzyBunnyThat's not a Karabiner 31, that's a Langgewehr '08 (I think, on short analysis, as I think the K31 is a bit shorter and the mag on the 31 is closer to the trigger guard.) Hurricane, I have one of those. You can use standard Swiss army 7.5mm "Ordonnanz" ammo for it (5 francs for a box of 20 or something like that.) You're also allowed to fire it at any official rifle range, although you may need to join a club.

All Swiss army bolt-actions from the "Vetterligewehr" (I believe the official designation was Langgewehr '96 or some such) through the 1955 sniper (the K31 with some adaptations to the cartridge ejection mechanism) were straight-pull actions--very cool designs and an absolute incredible joy to shoot. Here's a page with more info;

http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/schmidt_rubin.html

Ask at a local range for their Jungschuetzensomethingorother. If you're in the Zurich area, we can go together when I'm back from South America. I have a Karabiner 31 as well, with bayonets for both rifles, cleaning supplies, etc. They are very very cheap to buy. If you get a chance, I recommend it, although if you're not in Switzerland, I suggest having it re-bored to NATO standard.

I recommend getting a nice bag for it (shouldn't run you more than 50.-) and taking it to a range on any day; there are always old guys there who will show you how to clean it, use it, etc. Just ask nicely and you'll usually find someone to help you with it. At the range I often go to, there's a 95 year old guy who goes to shoot his 1889/11 carbine regularly (although he nearly got kicked out for screwing around with it once :-)

You may also want to go to your local "Zeughaus" (armory) and buy some "Lederfett"--the Swiss army makes really good soap-like grease for the leather strap on it.[/quote]

Thx for the Info Fuzzy, I will ask at some offical rifle ranges.

I live near Zurich (about 1 hour with the train), but I'm going to england from the 3. August - 12. August. Where's the range you usually go to? The Rifle would need cleaning befor i could use it, but I will have a look about that.

And I also got a Remington 510, nice small gun :naughty:

We also had a walking Stick that was actually a gun! That was awesome but we haven't got it anymore and I haven't got any pics. :(

[quote=stylie]I did a search on the serial number... It seems your granpop stole it from MY granpop. I'll be over tomorrow to collect. Thanks in advance for cleaning it!

No way you will get the rifle :moon:;)




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