Strengthening Wireless Connection -1 reply

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foodmaniac2003

Gelato pwns all

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11th March 2006

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#1 12 years ago

Does anybody know how to strengthen a wireless connection? Sometimes I lose my signal during a game and it gets really annoying. Is there some software or applications I could buy or download to help me not lose my wireless connection as much, or to strengthen it?




FactionRecon

11PzG Grunt

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4th August 2003

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#2 12 years ago

I used to have the same porblem with my wireless cutting out at random times. I couldn't hardly download anything actually it got so bad. I don't really have any solutions for you, since all I did was run a cable from the router to my PC.




DerMann

Webley Fanatic

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9th November 2004

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#3 12 years ago

Aye, wired routers are better, in my opinion. Just buy some Cat5 off eBay (I got 50 feet of Cat5e for $12).




Braun

www.the8tharmy.com

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#4 12 years ago
Komrad_B

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#5 12 years ago
Braun I have no clue

Nice quote there :nodding:




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#6 12 years ago

Foodmaniac, a while ago I wrote a little "how to" on boosting your signal. Have a look:

http://www.gamingforums.com/showthread.php?t=255995

There's a big long post about wireless in there somewhere (first page of the thread.)

Basically, you can:

-Make sure you're on one of the primary channels I describe in there -Run a sniffer to see if your neighbors are on the same channel, then switch (like Wellenreiter or Kismet on the auditor bootable CD from http://www.remote-exploit.org) -Adjust your antenna physical direction as described -Move your access point -If it's a Linksys AP, get a different firmware.

That said, I'd always put my DSL router/cable modem in the same room as my main PC(s), connect these directly via cat5 or cat6 (putting a firewall in between, of course) and only use wi-fi for laptops.




Braun

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#7 12 years ago
Komrad_BNice quote there :nodding:

Ah man, now everyone's going to laugh at me.




[130pz.]Kading

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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9th April 2005

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#8 12 years ago
foodmaniac2003Does anybody know how to strengthen a wireless connection? Sometimes I lose my signal during a game and it gets really annoying. Is there some software or applications I could buy or download to help me not lose my wireless connection as much, or to strengthen it?

rub your modem with cheetah blood.




foodmaniac2003

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#9 12 years ago

I have a Belkin Wireless DSL Router currently. Its very good, but there are good days and bad days. http://catalog.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Product_Id=184316

Oh, and whats a Cat5 or Cat6 thing youre talking about? Which should I get?

I don't thing that anyone is stealing my wireless though because I have a password called WEP encryption or something...




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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#10 12 years ago

Foodmaniac, Cat5 and Cat6 are types of Ethernet cable. Cat6 is rated for gigabit, although I don't think you'll need that. It's also a bit more expensive, but for home use Cat6 is almost always fine. In general, wired/fixed network connections are always faster than wireless; however, given that your cable modem or DSL speed will be less than 10mbit in all likelihood, this won't matter much.

Belkin routers don't have an open hardware platform, so you can't update the firmware on them--don't worry about that.

Nobody is "stealing" your wireless. Wi-Fi is what's called a "contention-based medium". This means that, like water in a pipe, there can only be so much stuff floating around at any given time. It's the same for traffic on a wire (electrical collisions) and radio traffic in the air (the same reason you get interference when there's a bunch of radio stations in the same area, or why radios can sometimes pick up cordless phones.) So you're both fighting for the same limited resource.

The commercial wifi you're using is probably one of either the 802.11b or g standards (g is faster.) However, there are a few things to consider:

-Wifi has 11 or 13 channels, depending on your continent. There are 3 major ones: 1, 6 and 11 (or 13.) Those are the channels with the most "distance" between them. If, say, you're on 11 and your neighbor is too, both your speeds will be lower (see above.) To do this, get the auditor CD image I mentioned above, burn it to CD, boot your laptop from it (it won't install anything) and try to run a tool called wellenreiter or kismet. This will tell you if there are other wifi signals around, and what channel they are on. Then you can plan your network around this.

-If you have a network card in your PC that's 802.11b but your access point is 11g, your entire network will drop to 802.11b speeds (11mb/s as opposed to 45mb/s.) make sure everything's running on 'g' if possible; if you only have 'g' devices, make sure neither the access point nor your wifi card are running in what's called "mixed" (b+g) mode.




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