The Coffee drinkers arsenal: Swedish weapons during WW2 -1 reply

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#1 10 years ago

Invictus said it best, But I'll change some of the words:

Alot of people are posting these threads lately so I want to join them with making a thread about my own nation, Sweden. It won't be a very long thread since the Swedish army during the war didn't see much action.

But I'll do my best!

Rifles Gevär m/96 swfig2.jpg the Mauser m/96 bolt action rifle. from 1889 to 1925 about 517,277 m/96 was produced. the composition never changed in any way, since the swedes considered their own steel to be superior to any other in the world. and it was the standard infantry rifle of the swedish army. it used 6.5 mm ammunition.

Gevär m/96-38 swfig3.jpg 40,000 of the m/96 rifles were modified and got a shorter barrel and other changes to make it handier for the foot soldier, as well as make it easier to use.

Karbin m/94 H04_178.jpg Sweden bought about 13,000 of these rifles from spain, and in 1896 sweden started its own production of the rifle. it got modified several times, for example in 1914 you could now fix a bayonet on the rifle. the rifle was mainly used by engineer and coastal artillery troops since they preferred a short, fast-handling rifle that provided the same firepower as the infantry rifle but in a lighter, shorter package.

Gevär m/38 swfig4.jpg the m/96-38 proved to be a huge success, so when an order came in to the Husqvarna factory in 1941, they were ordered to be built in the same pattern but changing the sights and the turned-down bolt-handle. 60,000 of these rifles were produced during the years 1942-1945.

Ljungman AG m/42 6.5 mm

Spoiler: Show
Ljungman_Ag42_Mine.jpg

this Semi-automatic rifle was used in the swedish army 1942-1960. 30,000 were produced all-in-all, which wasn't enough to replace the bolt-action m/96.

SMG's Suomi m/31 Submachine_gun_Suomi_M31.jpg this SMG was made in different variants for the swedish army: Kpist m/37, cal. 9x20 mm Kpist m/37-39, shortened barrel, cal. 9x19mm

Bergmann m/39 bergmann_mp35_2.jpg this swedish-produced SMG came in 2 different variants, both with a caliber of 9x19 mm. a long and a short version, they both had a fire-rate of 700 rounds per minute. Unkown (to me) number produced.

Thompson m/40 (1928) kpist_m40w.jpg sweden had a very limited number of these world-fameous SMGs during the war. 500 were ordered, and a much larger order were supposed to be issued, but after visiting USA and inspecting the weapon, sweden settled for the 500 that was already ordered. this was mainly because the Suomi m/31 were less than half the price of a thompson, and no swedish weapon used the .45 caliber ammo of the thompson, so .45 ammo had to be produced just for this SMG.

Light/heavy machine guns Kulsprutegevär m/1921 kg_m21_901.jpg after the great war, sweden bought a number of BAR m/1918 from Colt. the weapon started to be produced in sweden, but with some variations from the original. The swedish version used 6.5 mm ammo rather than the 7,62 mm ammo the original used. the swedish version also came with a removable pistol-handle. Kulsprutegevär m/1937 this was a slightly modified version of the m/1921. a new barrel was attached that could quickly be exchanged (overheating I guess). this version was used in the swedish army well into the 1970's.

Kulsprutegevär m/1939 kg_m39.jpg when the war broke out, sweden quickly were in need of machine guns. and in all haste a machine gun was ordered from Czechoslovakia with a caliber of 7,9 mm. this weapon had the same construction as the english Bren. here it is mounted on an anti-aircraft-lafette.

Kulsprutegevär m/1940 05224.jpgApparently this machinge gun has some complicated history (perhaps someone here knows more.. mudra?) I don't want to say too much about it, but I've heard that it was quite worthless. and according to swedish sources it was designed by a german by the name Lauf. while the germans "blame" sweden for designing it. and some sources say that it was used only by the swedish army, and the Waffen SS.

anyway, sweden did produce it during the war.

Pistols Browning m/07 Husqvarna_m1907_1777.jpgthis pistol was created by John Browning in the early 20th century (1907 most likely?). during the years 1916-1940 the Husqvarna Factory produced 94,000 of these. It was the standard swedish pistol well into the 1980's when it was replaced by the Glock 17.

Lahti m/40 lahti_m40.jpg a swedish produced variant of the finish Lahti L-35. the m/40 is a simplified version of the L-35, but somewhat less reliable. Husqvarna produced 100 000 of these pistols during the years 1940-1946.

Grenades Handgranat m/40 IM000243.jpga swedish offensive grenade that exploded on impact. it weights 300 g.

other grenades that were used were: Handgranat m/18 (exploding on impact) Handgranat m/37 (timed fuse) Handgranat m/39 (timed fuse) couldn't find any info on these grenades. might be back if I do.

There you go! I've been sitting almost 2 hours straight searching the net and writing this. and I definately haven't got it all in. might be back later to add more. feel free to correct me if you find any faults.

I just remembered. this is in the "suggestions" section. well, when the continuation war gets added, swedish voulonteers should be in! :P




Ccharge

Can we just say we went?

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11th December 2008

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#2 10 years ago

Were These swedish rifles linked to the italian rifles at all? they look quite the same.




waw_Slayer

*bump*

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6th October 2008

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#3 10 years ago

Noone do care about sweden, they didnt even fight a war.




Flippy Warbear

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#4 10 years ago

Sorry Ted but I am pretty sure the Suomi was _not_ manufactured for other nations other than those serving under the finnish army. But later AFTER the war the Suomi was sold to many nations, such as denmark, sweden and switzerland.

So to say the Suomi was used by the swedes is supposed to be faulty, unless of course you mean swedish volunteers who fought for finland during winter and continuation wars.

I believe same goes to Lahti pistol.

Of course, I will not deny that I am not 100% sure about this. I have a vague memory image of the Suomi documentary saying that the manufacturing of the weapons under A.Lahti was for the finnish army, then after the war, he expanded his business. If you whip out a wiki-link to something disagreeing with my memory, I'll submit. :)




Guest

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#5 10 years ago

Ccharge;4745093Were These swedish rifles linked to the italian rifles at all? they look quite the same.[/quote] not that I know of, but some of these were bought from spain.

[quote=Flippy Warbear;4745110]Sorry Ted but I am pretty sure the Suomi was _not_ manufactured for other nations other than those serving under the finnish army. But later AFTER the war the Suomi was sold to many nations, such as denmark, sweden and switzerland.

So to say the Suomi was used by the swedes is supposed to be faulty, unless of course you mean swedish volunteers who fought for finland during winter and continuation wars.

I believe same goes to Lahti pistol.

Of course, I will not deny that I am not 100% sure about this. I have a vague memory image of the Suomi documentary saying that the manufacturing of the weapons under A.Lahti was for the finnish army, then after the war, he expanded his business. If you whip out a wiki-link to something disagreeing with my memory, I'll submit. :)

No problem, I'm happy to take any critiscm (constructive) I get. I looked up all this with the help of google and the website of the swedish army-museum. But the information I got the info about the Suomi and the Lahti were actually from wiki. Suomi M/31 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia if you check to the right under "production history", it says during 1931-1944 some swedish variants were produced. but as you say, these could be for swedish volounteers. Lahti L-35 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia here is for the lahti, just read the "Pistol m/40" part of the article. but please correct me/the wiki articles if they're wrong:)

oh and slayer, I'm aware that sweden hasn't fought in a war in 200 years (we've been neutral as long as switzerland), but I did this "just for fun", as well as for my own interest and to learn about it. I find it quite interesting




Flippy Warbear

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#6 10 years ago

All in honesty I cant admit I know that good. Im a bad finn. I'd just imagine that the weapon would not be manufactured for the swedes, nor anyone else as of the dire need for the own army. Also, Aimo Lahti was hired to the job by the finnish defensive forces and agreed to manufacture weapons for the finnish army. And still, during the winter war, the weapon was rather rare sight. Not that many as you could think had gone to the field itself. During the continuation war it was fortunately a bit different tale as the manufacturing went up higher.

After the war, Lahti (as said before) expanded his business to foreign countries, and by that time the modifications done to the weapon were made to suit the customer needs. I doubt they produced any Suomi's especially modified for just the swedish volunteers. :)




Guest

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#7 10 years ago

I understand your way of thinking:) but if I understood it correct, sweden got the license to produce the weapon in sweden, it wasn't finland that produced and sold them to sweden.




Flippy Warbear

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#8 10 years ago

Ah well thats different then. :D




Shield

Dragonbataljon 4.Skvadron

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#9 10 years ago

Ah, Karbin m/94. This is the rifle I used during my year as a royal guard in the Swedish military. A very good rifle indeed. I'm an excellent marksman with this rifle, second best in my platoon :smokin:

This rifle is still in use in the Swedish army today, even though it's only for the royal guard I think, as an tourist attraction :P here's a pic of it 6.jpg I'm somewhere around there :cool:

I have one question, you say that they where modified in 1914 so that you could fix a bayonet. My rifle was manufactured in 1898 but still could be fixed with a bayonet, those this mean that they modified all the old ones as well for the bayonet?

Great research by the way...




Thorondor123

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21st August 2003

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#10 10 years ago
waw_Slayer;4745099Noone do care about sweden, they didnt even fight a war.

Tell that to the 10 000 swedes who fought in Finland against the soviets. They'll slap you with a herring.