The Creative&Different Movies Thread -1 reply

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Safe-Keeper

Aw, c'mon Cyan, it's quality!

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28th September 2004

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#1 12 years ago

:D

[COLOR=Sienna]Sick[/COLOR] and [COLOR=Sienna]tired[/COLOR] of the identical, cliché-filled, historically inaccurate Hollywood-movies (with a few exceptions, of course;)), I've decided to start this thread. Let's recommend to each others some movies that are not well-known, but still good and different from the "mainstream" ones.[INDENT][COLOR=Purple] icon4.gif Please don't just type the movie's name and leave. I don't want this to be a "spam" thread. Write a few thought-out sentences about the movie that exceeds the level of "OMG it r teh roxxorz" or even "best movie ever!". It does not have to be several paragraphs, but put some effort into it! Thanks a lot![/COLOR][COLOR=SeaGreen] [/COLOR] [/INDENT][COLOR=SeaGreen]Ambulancen (Ambulance), Denmark:[/COLOR][COLOR=Black]OK, I'll be fair and honest: I haven't seen it yet. But it looks very promising concept-wise, so I want to give it a try.

Basically, Ambulancen (Danish for "the ambulance") is about two Danish men who rob a bank to pay for their mother's surgery. The robbery ends in a police chase on foot, and to get away the robbers jack - of all things - an ambulance. As if that's not bad enough, once they get going they realize that they've got two passengers in the back: A heart patient and a crewman desperately trying to save his life.[/COLOR] Who to save? Heart patient by means of going to the hospital, or mommy by means of getting away?

What makes the movie so interesting is that it was supposed to follow three rules:

  1. Only one scene [COLOR=Purple][COLOR=Black][[/COLOR]in this case, in an ambulance. It failed to follow this one[COLOR=Black]][/COLOR][/COLOR].
  2. Real-time. No time-lapses.
  3. Only four characters [COLOR=Purple][COLOR=Black][[/COLOR]the robbers, the nurse, and the heart patient[/COLOR]].

I doubt the movie's been released in too many countries (Amazon didn't have it:confused:). [COLOR=SeaGreen] [/COLOR] [COLOR=DarkGreen][COLOR=SeaGreen]Elling, Norway: [/COLOR][COLOR=Black]Elling, put simply, is about two [/COLOR][/COLOR]mentally ill men who move out of their sheltered environments and into a downtown Oslo appartment, dealing with challenges ranging from answering the phone to going to a resturant. Assisted by a social worker, they are to become integrated into "normal" life.

The movie is good in my eyes mainly because it's realistic: Unlike Hollywood's childish and annoying take on mentally ill, it is not a mockery or a parody: It's a cute family movie about two people trying to become "like everyone else". It's got some flaws (for example, although one of the characters in the movie's lost his mother recently, he for whatever reason does not grieve at all:confused:), but mostly it's just a beautiful depiction of love, poetry, social interaction, and the Norwegian welfare system*. [COLOR=SeaGreen] [/COLOR] [COLOR=DarkGreen][COLOR=SeaGreen]12 angry men, USA: [/COLOR][COLOR=Black]After an exceedingly one-sided trial, the jury retires to determine the verdict: Guilty or not guilty of homicide? The suspect, a young boy from the slums, has allegedly stabbed his own father in the chest, and if found guilty, the boy will be put to death by means of electric chair.

After the trial, all the jurors - except one - are convinced of the boy's guilt. The last one is not so sure, and a "second thought" of one of the prosecution's points escalates into the discovery of more and more holes in the evidence presented by the witnesses and investigators.

The movie is, like Ambulancen, mostly set in one locale; In this case, the room the jorors spend 99% of their time. There also are not significant time-lapses. It is, summed up, a ninety-minutes long debate. Sound boring? It's not, particularly if debating is an interest of yours.

What's also interesting is, of course, that we never figure out if the kid is guilty. Did he do it or didn't he:confused:?

[/COLOR][/COLOR][COLOR=Sienna]*At which point I realized that I'd unintentially posted one movie where a couple needs money for surgery as the welfare system can't handle it, and one singing the praises of the welfare system. Heh, score one for objectivity.[/COLOR]




stylie

Mas stylie por favor...

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13th April 2005

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#2 12 years ago

Awesome, when this dies down I'll post my movie thread that I was thinking about recently. Ambulencen sounds great, good premise. My first one is a movie thats probably about 5-6 years old right now called "The Cube" Low budget sci-fi type movie that is about escaping a prison made of thousands of small cubes. Some are deadly and the movie is quite graphic at times. The entire movie is shot in just one cube. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0123755/ I'll think of another.




jumjum

Write heavy; write hard.

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11th April 2005

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#3 12 years ago

Well done, Safe Keeper. Impressive. I'll give you a stream-of-consciousness take on movies I like and can think of at this instant. This is as I recall and top-of-the-head.

The Lion In Winter - ca. 1968. This is what Who's Afraid Of Virginia Woolf would be like if it was set in medieval England. Stars a late-30's Peter O'Toole as England's Henry II of England and a mid-60's Katherine Hepburn as, IIRC, Eleanor of Aquitaine, Anthony Hopkins as their oldest surviving son Richard (future King Richard "The Lionheart"), another guy I don't know as middle son Geoffrey, and the same person who played Arthur in "Excalibur" as youngest son Stephen. A very young Tinothy Dalton plays the newly-crowned King Of France.

It might help to know a little history to watch the movie, but it can be done with no preparation just to enjoy the richness and depth these actors bring to the story. I think it is beyond question Peter O'Toole's finest work, hands-down. It takes place at Christmas time in late 12th century England, and Henry II, virile and robust as a young king who has done much to unify and empower England, is now in late middle age and feeling old. His older French wife is a match for him in power, intellect ambition and ruthlessness, and he has had to keep her under close house-arrest in a French convent for several years since she led rebellions against him. But he still lets her travel to see him at Christmas. They hate each other, and she has tried to have Henry killed, yet at the same time have a sort of love as well, and were passionate with each other when Henry was young. They can be touchingly open and candid with each other one moment, and then in an instant be shockingly cruel and ruthless, going for each others old wounds.

Their sons are disappointments to them, with none showing the qualities Henry knows he needs to survive as king. Their oldest son, who would have made a strong king, died several years before, and the three surviving sons have such character flaws that Henry despairs. Richard cares nothing for the drudgery of statecraft, preferring to spend his time in war and hunting... and hunting beautiful young boys. Geoffrey is an obvious weasel and liar; a cowardly schemer, wheeling and dealing with everyone. Stephen is a near-idiot, still in his teens, and very immature and childishly self-centered. Over the years Eleanor has manipulated them all for her own ends, playing and changing favorites, promising first one and then another that he shall be king. She has taught them to be cruel, cynical and ambitious deceivers. They recognize what a vicious woman she is, but still love her in their way.

Henry has taken yet another very young mistress, and he lets his family know he plans to petition the Pope for a divorce from Eleanor, marry his commoner mistress, and start over trying to produce a new heir to the throne. This would put Eleanor's sons out of the succession, and her three sons see this as a direct threat. Let the scheming and betrayals begin.

The unhappy family gathers in a castle in France for a sham of a celebration of Christmas. France and Ebgland are at peace, primarily because France is virtually a vassal-state of England at ths time. Much of France is controlled by England either thorugh conquest by wars of Henry, or because they are lands brought to the marriage by Eleanor, who herself owned several entire provinces when she married Henry.

Joining them at the castle is the newly-crowned Philip (II?), King of France, barely out of his teens, who is bitter over how Henry continually bested and humiliated his father, the recently deceased French king. The dead king was a gentle and pious man, and the new king despises his memory for what he sees as weakness. The new King Philip is the antithesis of his father, and wants revenge. And he takes it most terribly in a scene which is shattering in the depth of its betrayal and cruelty. It is perhaps one of the most vicious scenes of coldy calculated, complete revenge found anywhere in film.

The arc of the movie follows the tangled skein of the dealing, double-dealing and triple-dealing that the threat to succession results in. Even though the film depicts people and events from over 800 years ago, the conflicts and emotions are immediately recognizable to us. The family dynamics, cruel and cynical as they are, are still familiar to us. The characters hurt and betray each other in achingly painful ways.

This is, in the true sense, an adult film, with adult themes and circumstances. If you like the Rambo movies, you almost certainly won't be able to watch 15 minutes of TLIW. But to me it is a work almost worthy of Shakespeare. I can't recall who wrote the script, but he did a magnificent job. It is also painful, in a sense, to watch these characters destroy each other. But in the end O'Toole lets Henry's love of life come through in a satisfying way. Most of the characters are sympathetic regardless of their many flaws, but you'll never view a Katherine Hepburn film in the same way after you see her manipulate her way through this one. And O'Toole is the greatets living actor in the English-speaking world today. His wonderful roaring is reason alone to watch this movie.

I'm tired. No mas.




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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#4 12 years ago

The Cube is a great work, made on something like a $40,000 budget. Really blew my mind, it's what Saw and Se7en could have been.

My all-time favorite? Dr. Strangelove. What can I say? It's flawless. The number and quality of references in that movie, and its nasty wit (in addition to its being a near picture-perfect spoof of Fail Safe) make it a pleasure. Watch it, over-analyzing and describing it just won't do it justice.

That, and the 1995 version of Richard III, set in 1930s England; "Now is the winter of our discontent" delivered casually while Ian McKellen/Richard III is taking a slash, what can I say, genius.

And since we're referring to it in a parallel thread, The Princess Bride just because it's one of the funniest movies ever made.

I had a great English class in high school; called "Film as Literature", most people took it as an easy alternative to the "real classes". It was taught by an absolutely titanic woman (must have weighed 400 pounds.) She didn't over-analyze films, but just showed them and let us watch and then basically said "ok, discuss." Her selection was impeccable (Dr. Strangelove, Deliverance, Citizen Kane and a few others, which, for high school students are pretty good introduction to the fact that there's life beyond summer blockbusters. So I am not a big fan of film critiques/analyses; for me it's like good wine, or someone's mp3 playlist. Just have a look for yourself.




Duke of Holland

:o)

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#5 12 years ago

The Cube is an excellent movie. All time favorite movie would be Seven Samurai by Akira Kurosawa (Dont know if I got that right) and many many more :D




stylie

Mas stylie por favor...

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#6 12 years ago

Oooh ohh ohhh!!! I forgot... Friggen' KILL BILL!!! AWESOME movie. both episodes Remember PAI MAE??? And his "tutelage? And then the Bride exacting revenge on his killer was incredible. The crazy 88's as well as "Go-Go" and her master.




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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#7 12 years ago

Too long; part II was too anticlimactic, somehow. Although the five-finger death move scene was pretty cool. Reservoir Dogs....




Safe-Keeper

Aw, c'mon Cyan, it's quality!

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#8 12 years ago

The Cube sounds downright awesome. Reminds me of Dungeons&Dragons, which I played until I gave it up (my fellow adventurers were too childish and immature for it to be any fun). I'd like to take it up again with a mature crowd. As for A lion in winter, Empires: Dawn of the Modern World did a good take on Richard's early life and times (ending at the point of him besieging Paris). The awesome game has some splendid campaigns, and is highly recommended.

Thanks for the extensive article, jumjum. Keep eating yoghurt:p.

I'm bending my own unwritten rule by posting a well-known movie, but in the end, I felt I couldn't get around Lola Rennt (Run Lola Run). Don't judge me too hard:).

[COLOR=Green]Lola Rennt[/COLOR][COLOR=Green], Germany (the rest of you, of course, don't have to use this header format;)!): [COLOR=Black]This 82 minutes long German master-piece is hard to define genre-wise. It's part music video, part action movie (the actual music video which should be in the special features section on the DVD is also downright awesome).

Lola Rennt is so unique in that it's so fast-paced, and that it conveys how the tiniest of changes (such as falling down a flight of stairs) can dramatically alter what is going to happen. It's set in three parts, each starting off exactly the same way: With Lola dropping the phone receiver and setting off down the flight of stairs with her alcoholic mother yelling after her to remember to buy shampoo. I also love how nearly every single character, even the random people she meet on the street, has some sort of connection to the script, and that the more times you watch it, the more little details you notice. You have to watch it dozens of times and probably "cheat" by using the Director's commentary to notice them all.

Lola's mission, which sets her running down the stairs from her appartment, is one that's been used many times before: She must get so-and-so much money in so-and-so many minutes. Her boyfriend, Manni, was scheduled to be picked up by her after a drug deal, but her moped got stolen, forcing Manni to make use of the subway. He then manages to lose the 200 000 mark he's carrying when he makes a hasty retreat from subway security. Inquiring on the next station, he learns that a certain homeless man has made off with the money. He also knows that if he does not produce the cash in 20 minutes, he'll be dead meat - the gang leader, Ronny, is not the forgiving type, and Manni has already earned his distrust once.

Manni thus calls Lola, who agrees to meet him outside a supermarket with the money, in order to prevent him from having to rob the supermarket to obtain the cash. Her father, who works in a bank, is her best choice, but the movie presents a few other opportunities, too.

The movie follows Lola 90% of the time, with a ticking clock and a nervous Manni making several appearances underway. The key here is action. Lola's running, the music is an action-theme, the camera conveys hurry, and you've got a countdown going. There are also some series of clips on the people she interacts with (read: yells at, bumps into, threatens with a gun, etc.;)). The movie is, again, awesome in part for its fast pace.

The other thing that sticks with you is the philosophical aspect. As was said, the movie's in three parts, each with a few minor changes dramatically altering the story, especially since the characters are tied into each others so nicely. I won't give any examples as it'd spoil the plot, so just take my word on this: As the trailer says, "every second of every day you make a decision that could change your life". [/COLOR][/COLOR]




Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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#9 12 years ago

Wait a second, you posted 12 Angry Men as a not-well-known movie? No wonder I missed that part. Dude. That's a cinematic classic.

And Lola Rennt is the nuts.




stylie

Mas stylie por favor...

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#10 12 years ago
Safe KeeperThe Cube sounds downright awesome. Reminds me of Dungeons&Dragons, Thanks for the extensive article, jumjum. Keep eating yoghurt:p. I'm bending my own unwritten rule by posting a well-known movie, but in the end, I felt I couldn't get around Lola Rennt (Run Lola Run). Don't judge me too hard:). [COLOR=green][COLOR=black][/COLOR][/COLOR]

Yeah, it will hook you from the very first scene. A guy dies a very unusual and graphic death. Not very Dungeons and Dragons though.

I loved Run Lola Run, I beleive I saw both versions. I believe some of it was animated, no? Maybe that was just the intro. There was alot of really cool movies that came out in that time period that were in the same sort of vein, such as "Memento". Alot of good movies at that same time such as, Snatch, Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrells. Also another good one was "Brotherhood of the Wolf". Another good movie that some of the older guys may remember is "Fandango". Judd Nelson and Kevin Costner, from the mid eighties. It was your standard coming of age movie. Im stealing from IMDB here... It's 1971 at the University of Texas, Austin. College buddies, facing graduation, marriage, and the draft, skip out of their own graduation party and head to the Mexican border for some adventure, a buried secret, and one last go-around at "the privileges of youth".