442nd Reg. Combat Team -1 reply

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Sleestack

Got some death to do.

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10th July 2006

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#1 13 years ago

Perhaps a map with the nisei 442nd RCT would be a good one to dev. After all they are the most decorated unit in the U.S. army with

& 7 Presidential Unit Citations I can think of no more deserving group of people to have a map made for & dedicated to. How can you not respect a group of men whos motto was "Go for broke!":salute:




Gauntlet

Dead rather than Red!

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26th April 2004

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#2 13 years ago

You could start with providing some info of where they fought! :p




Sleestack

Got some death to do.

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10th July 2006

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#3 13 years ago

guard supply trains in North Africa. However, Colonel Farrant L. Turner insisted that the 100th be given a combat mission, and it was attached to the 34th "Red Bull" Division.The 100th sailed from North Africa with 1,300 men on September 22, 1943 and landed at Salerno on September 26, 1943. After obtaining its initial objective of Monte Milleto, the 100th joined the assault on Monte Cassino. The 100th fought valiantly, suffering many casualties; by February 1944, it could muster only 521 men. The depleted battalion joined the defense of the beachhead at Anzio until May 1944, and then added momentum to the push for Rome, but was halted only 10 miles from the city. Some believe that the 100th was deliberately halted to allow non-Nisei soldiers to liberate Rome. The 442nd (other than the 1st battalion, much of which had already been sent as replacements for the 100th, and the remainder of which remained in the U.S. to train further replacements) landed at Anzio and joined the 100th Battalion in Civitavecchia north of Rome on June 10, 1944. The 100th Battalion was now officially part of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, but was allowed to keep its unit designation in recognition of its distinguished fighting record. The combined unit continued in the push up Italy, before joining the invasion of southern France, where the 442nd participated in the fight to liberate Bruyeres in south France, and famously rescued the "Lost Battalion" at Biffontaine. Pursuant to army tradition of never leaving soldiers behind, over a five-day period, from 26 October to 30 October 1944, the 442nd suffered over 800 casualties—nearly half of its roster—while rescuing 211 members of the 1st Battalion, 141st Infantry (U.S. 36th Infantry Division, originally Texas National Guard), which had been surrounded by German forces in the Vosges mountains since 24 October. The 522nd Field Artillery Battalion remained in France, and joined the push into Germany in late 1944 and 1945. Scouts from the 522nd were among the first Allied troops to release prisoners from the Dachau concentration camp. The remainder of the 442nd returned to Italy to continue the fight against the Gothic Line established by German Field Marshal Kesselring in the Apennines. [COLOR=red]The 442nd is commonly reported to have suffered a casualty rate of 314 percent (i.e. on average, each man was injured more than three times),[/COLOR] informally derived from 9,486 purple hearts divided by some 3,000 original in-theater personnel. U.S. Army battle reports show the official casualty rate, combining KIA (killed) with MIA (missing) and WIA (wounded and removed from action) totals, is 93%, still uncommonly high. The purple heart figure, though representing a broader range of wounds including those which may not have removed a soldier from action, is disputed by some researchers. A good amount of these Purple Hearts have been awarded during the campaign in the Vosges Mountains. Some wounded were soldiers who were victims of trenchfoot. But many victims of trenchfoot were forced by superiors, or willingly chose, to return to the front even though they were classified as WIA. Thank God for copy & paste!




Sleestack

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#4 13 years ago

The 100th landed at Oran in Algeria on September 2, 1943, and was originally scheduled to guard supply trains in North Africa. However, Colonel Farrant L. Turner insisted that the 100th be given a combat mission, and it was attached to the 34th "Red Bull" Division. The 100th sailed from North Africa with 1,300 men on September 22, 1943 and landed at Salerno on September 26, 1943. After obtaining its initial objective of Monte Milleto, the 100th joined the assault on Monte Cassino. The 100th fought valiantly, suffering many casualties; by February 1944, it could muster only 521 men. The depleted battalion joined the defense of the beachhead at Anzio until May 1944, and then added momentum to the push for Rome, but was halted only 10 miles from the city. Some believe that the 100th was deliberately halted to allow non-Nisei soldiers to liberate Rome. The 442nd (other than the 1st battalion, much of which had already been sent as replacements for the 100th, and the remainder of which remained in the U.S. to train further replacements) landed at Anzio and joined the 100th Battalion in Civitavecchia north of Rome on June 10, 1944. The 100th Battalion was now officially part of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team, but was allowed to keep its unit designation in recognition of its distinguished fighting record. The combined unit continued in the push up Italy, before joining the invasion of southern France, where the 442nd participated in the fight to liberate Bruyeres in south France, and famously rescued the "Lost Battalion" at Biffontaine. Pursuant to army tradition of never leaving soldiers behind, over a five-day period, from 26 October to 30 October 1944, the 442nd suffered over 800 casualties—nearly half of its roster—while rescuing 211 members of the 1st Battalion, 141st Infantry (U.S. 36th Infantry Division, originally Texas National Guard), which had been surrounded by German forces in the Vosges mountains since 24 October. The 522nd Field Artillery Battalion remained in France, and joined the push into Germany in late 1944 and 1945. Scouts from the 522nd were among the first Allied troops to release prisoners from the Dachau concentration camp. The remainder of the 442nd returned to Italy to continue the fight against the Gothic Line established by German Field Marshal Kesselring in the Apennines. The 442nd is commonly reported to have suffered a casualty rate of 314 percent (i.e. on average, each man was injured more than three times), informally derived from 9,486 purple hearts divided by some 3,000 original in-theater personnel. U.S. Army battle reports show the official casualty rate, combining KIA (killed) with MIA (missing) and WIA (wounded and removed from action) totals, is 93%, still uncommonly high. The purple heart figure, though representing a broader range of wounds including those which may not have removed a soldier from action, is disputed by some researchers. A good amount of these Purple Hearts have been awarded during the campaign in the Vosges Mountains. Some wounded were soldiers who were victims of trenchfoot. But many victims of trenchfoot were forced by superiors, or willingly chose, to return to the front even though they were classified as WIA. Thank GOD for copy & paste. Im sure that somewhere in there is a great map to develope. The lost battalion kinda jumps to mind.

Hell, even the USAF has honored them here recently by naming a C-17 Globemaster "Go for broke!" & EVERYONE knows how much the army & airforce gets along outside the battlefield.

Hickam honors World War II vets with new C-17 Tech. Sgt. Ronald Timbreza marshals a C-17 Globemaster III to its parking spot at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, on Wednesday, June 14. The "Spirit of 'Go for Broke'" is named in honor of the 442nd Regimental Combat Team. The 442nd, comprised of 3,800 Japanese Americans, fought with distinction during World War II in North Africa and Europe, becoming one of the most highly decorated units in the history of the U.S. military. (U.S. Air Force photo/Tech. Sgt. Shane A. Cuomo)




Oldschool

Shinjirarenai!

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19th April 2003

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#5 13 years ago

A map featuring these guys would be very cool. It still amazes me that they fought so hard for a country that obviously didn't want or trust them.




emonkies

I'm too cool to Post

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17th July 2003

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#6 13 years ago

It has been suggested before but BF1942 did allow us to do things like that.

BF2 might support it, we still have to see.

But if it does Id like to see them represented.




Sleestack

Got some death to do.

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10th July 2006

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#7 13 years ago
OldschoolA map featuring these guys would be very cool. It still amazes me that they fought so hard for a country that obviously didn't want or trust them.

Not entirely accurate there. Its not realy a matter of 'want' & the german sabotage that occured in the U.S. raised the paranoia level in this country to a fairly high level BEFORE pearl harbor. Put yourself in the place of the U.S. Govt. at the time & after having part of your country & a considerable chunk of your navy blown away its rather easy to slip over the edge into paranoia. There even were elements of some criminal society (black dragon/black lotus society, something like that) in the continental U.S. so the fears werent entirely groundless. Was the internment right? No, but what choice did they have? Not all of them fought FOR the country per say, they fought for their honor & won IMHO. I sure hope that someone does a map based on these guys.




=7DR=von.small

for hire

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4th August 2005

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#8 13 years ago

nice thread. :nodding: Reading that has made me reinstall Road to Rome, I know it's nothing like what you mentioned above, but it just seemed to remind me of how underrated certain things can be.




GunsOfBrixton29

[8th] Col. Brixton

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23rd May 2004

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#9 13 years ago

I think I saw a trailer for a new movie about these guys. Looked pretty good.

In fact here it is:

http://www.onlythebravemovie.com/thetrailer.php

Correction: Looks really f**king good!




SilenT AssassiN

A South African Bohemian

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9th October 2003

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#10 13 years ago

I suggested this for FH1 a long time ago, it would be awsome to see it on a map on FH2.

Being 1/2 Japanese I had two family members fight in the 442nd.

The Movie Looks great!