Soviet Naval Infantry. -1 reply

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[130pz.]Kading

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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9th April 2005

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#31 13 years ago

that is a giant shotgun, BTW.




Guest

I didn't make it!

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#32 13 years ago

i was thinking it was a AT gun or an old musket




Gauntlet

Dead rather than Red!

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26th April 2004

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#33 13 years ago

looks more like an musket, than a shotgun or AT gun.




[130pz.]Kading

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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9th April 2005

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#34 13 years ago

it is a giant percussion cap shotgun. it was used to kill entire flocks of ducks in one shot.




The Ultimate Drifter

*Professional Drunk Driver*

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1st October 2004

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#35 13 years ago

Wow, those look so cool. I always liked the cold war era warships Russia had. The Osa fast patrols and all the other fast local water ships. I had no idea they had a cool shallow water navy in the second world war. Would you put those boats on maps with rivers or were there any larger naval clashes? Did they ever mix it up with E boats? I would love to see this in FH2. Well, I'd like to see a navy in general. Great idea!




Gauntlet

Dead rather than Red!

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#36 13 years ago

pffff...you may keep your Osa class! I would much rather own an Tarantul!




alrek

I'm too cool to Post

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23rd June 2003

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#37 13 years ago

some more information about these gunboats

About the BK1125... The Soviet BK1125 boat was used between 1939 and 1945 in all European fronts, from Austria in 1945 to Stalingrad...in all rivers. This armoured ship was used like a tank in a river, in fact Bronekater (BK) means armoured ship. The ship was specially designed to carry different turrets, specially T34, T28 turrets and Dushka turrets. The normal tank factories produced the same turrets for tanks and ships. The Soviets used these ships in frontal attacks against land-based tanks and enemy infantry. These ships were armed with Katiusha rockets and T34 turrets - the effect was terrifying. The BK ships were also used for carpet bombing fortifications or cities (Vienna in Austria was bombed by these ships). The BK had 10 crew, all of them naval personnel. The BK ships were transported by train to move the units from a river to other, it was therefore specifically designed to enter tunnels and cross bridges aboard wagon trains



alrek

I'm too cool to Post

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23rd June 2003

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#38 13 years ago

details of some battles that took place on russian rivers. these quotes are from an article written by an unnarmed russian former naval person

On those days, whatever we were doing, my thoughts were with Pinsk - this is how Rear-Admiral Vissarion Grigoryev, then commander of the Dnieper River Flotilla, remembered the events of July 1944. Advancing Soviet troops could storm that town, surrounded by rivers and impassable marshes, only from the east and north-east. But there was also the way from the south, which could enable a surprise attack into the enemy rear. The command of the Dnieper flotilla suggested to the command of the 61st Army, which was about to commence the assault, a bold plan: to engage flotilla's ships, incur into the enemy rear some 18-20 km, boldly storm into the city limits and disembark an infantry regiment right in the middle of the town. Byelorussian partisans had to remove beforehand all the German outposts and emplacements along the ships' route. The action had to be carried out without an artillery barrage.

At the night to 12 July seven armoured boats and five AA boats with the first landing party set off and in three hours they appeared right in front of the piers of the river port. The Nazis had literally overslept the landing and opened a chaotic shooting after 10-12 minutes, while the Russians had already stormed into the town. In 40 minutes the whole regiment was already disembarked and the armoured boats, having assumed positions on the river, rendered an artillery support. However, in the morning hitlerites counter-attacked with two reinforced motorized infantry regiments and pushed the Russians back to the embankment. Heavy fights flared up in the adjacent park. The landing party needed urgent aid and so the flotilla command decided to organize a daylight break-through.

Three armoured boats - BKA-2, BKA-43 and BKA-92 - each carrying 90-95 soldiers set off to Pinsk. The commander of the armoured boats' squadron, Senior Lieutenant I. M. Plekhov, who took part in the action later noted: Behind the last turn we saw the town and at the same time we got under the fire of gun-carriers, which came out to the embankment completely unexpected. The boats could neither turn nor speed up. We could clearly see "ferdinands" turning their "trunks" to us, but our guns were helpless against their 200mm armour.

BKA-92 received the main blow. Enemy shells had literally honeycombed the ship, but she fulfilled her task: reached the waterfronts in the city centre and went aground; the soldiers jumped into the water. Also the BKA-2 went aground and only the BKA-43 remained untouched and disembarked her landing party on a pier. The aid came just in time: having the flotilla's artillery support, infantry could hold its positions in the bridgehead until the arrival of the troops storming Pinsk by land. Ten days later, during a meeting of the flotilla's crews, Admiral Grigoryev said that there, on the banks of the Pina River, would surely be erected a monument to the sailors and soldiers fallen during the liberation of the town. And such a monument was erected indeed - it is the heroic BKA-92 raised from the bottom to the pedestal. This ship is a representative of an interesting family of riverine boats, which had no analogical constructions in foreign navies. Their role in the Great Patriotic War of the USSR brought them sympathetic nicknames derived from the Russian abbreviation of the name of their class - bronyashki ("armouries"), bychki ("calves"), bukashki ("bugs"), etc.

another battle

Those were the armoured boats of the Danube River Flotilla that carried out the first amphibious operation of the Germano-Soviet war. On 24 June 1941 at 2:30 the guns of the Soviet monitors and land artillery opened fire at the Romanian side of the Danube. Simultaneously four BKA's with landing parties went to the action. At 2:45 the heavy artillery shifted its fire farther inward the enemy territory. The boats opened artillery and machine-gun fire at the targets within the landing zones and simultaneously soldiers jumped into the water and unfolded the attack against the riverbank. In half an hour the fight was over; the Russians took first POW's and trophies. But the most important of all was that the direct artillery fire at Izmail was terminated. Two days after in another sector of the Germano-Soviet front fought with distinction three boats of the Pinsk River Flotilla. By night 26 June 1941 monitor Smolensk, and armoured boats BKA-202,BKA-205 and BKA-205 secretly ventured as far as 12km into the enemy-occupied territory, established an artillery range-reckoning outpost and shelled a German passage across the Berezina where the Nazi command was moving reinforcements against the counter-attacking Soviet 21st Army.

Stalingrad operations

On 23 June 1942 fifteen boats of the Volga River Flotilla, armed with the old 76mm Lender AA-guns, assumed their convoy duties. Within one month they repelled 190 air attacks and escorted 128 convoys without losses. This way was frustrated the Nazi command's idea to hamper by the means of the air forces the most important inland communication route - the Volga River - where was going up to 60% of all the supplies for Stalingrad. Later those ships conducted reconnaissance, shelling targets on the occupied banks, disembarking landing parties and evacuating the casualties. But the hardest service was on the passages across the Volga. The hitlerites, who seized the hills dominating over the city, conducted intense artillery fire on the farwaters, and the whole burden of supplying the Soviet forces fighting in the streets of the city lied on the BKA's, whose small dimensions, high speed and heavy armour made them irreplaceable in those circumstances. Every night, under the light of German projectors and flares, and the shower of their shells and bombs, small ships were making 8 to 10 sorties across the river, bringing Stalingrad soldiers, weapons, ammunition and food. At rare nights, when the enemy for some reason remained idle, big boats would take up to 200 soldiers, and small boats - up to 100. Years later the commander of the famous 62nd Army, Vasiliy Chuikov, in his wartime reminiscences evaluated the role of the Volga flotilla's boaters very high: About the role of the sailors of the fleet and their exploits, I would say briefly that had it not been for them the 62nd Army might have perished without ammunition and rations, and could not have carried out its task.

bridge.jpg




King_Parliament

I don't spend enough time here

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6th October 2003

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#39 13 years ago

Concerning the application of Naval troops...

Could a que be put on the models like on the weapon applications? Maps in Staligrad could favor from sparse placement of Naval troops, instead of huge divisions of them. Soviet Marines weren't quite in huge numbers proportionate to your average Soviet infantrymen, so ground battles that place only Marines fighting the fascists would seem silly.

I hugely support river maps/baltic navy engagements that give the Marines an emphasis. That'd be really cool.