Weapon Climb -1 reply

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Fuzzy Bunny

Luke, I am your mother.

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2nd May 2005

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#11 12 years ago
A_tree;3405860SMGs are basicaly big guns shooting small rounds, most have very little recoil

I won't argue on the SMG recoil, as I've never fired one, but a .45 ACP IS NOT A "SMALL" ROUND.

Muzzle climb is more a combined function of the round's power ("recoil" or "kick") and whether or not the barrel is in line with the main impact point of the stock -- that is why modern assault rifles have a straight line from tip to end. That is why pistols tend to kick upwards--the line of recoil is _above_ the anchor of the weapon, i.e. your hand.




craka)(craka

Stack it high, tough guy!

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9th January 2005

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#12 12 years ago

I'm sure it's easier to shoot a .45 out of a supported(buttstock) weapon then out of a handgun(I've fired one). Plus it's easier to keep an SMG steady than a gun that is 'floating' in the air.




pmbf1942

A BF1942 Fan/ Mcbob from SSLF

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17th February 2006

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#13 12 years ago

But, a .45 with an unaligned stock=more climb and recoil. When was the compensator introduced to the thompson in WW2?




[130pz.]Kading

I take what n0e says way too seriously

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9th April 2005

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#14 12 years ago
pmbf1942;3409855But, a .45 with an unaligned stock=more climb and recoil. When was the compensator introduced to the thompson in WW2?

it wasnt, it was removed durring the war to speed up production. only the early military models were fitted with the Cutts Compensator and assault grip. these early models were extremely effective, especially when fitted with drum magazines, the added mass of which made the weapon rock solid.




McGibs

FHdev

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3rd October 2003

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#15 12 years ago

you mean the m1928 that the brits used in africa?




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