The P38 -1 reply

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Uncle_Sam

Pass me a Lucky Strike...

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23rd December 2003

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#51 16 years ago

I found the most interesting aspect of the P38 was bailing. Many times the pilot was cut in half or severely injured(aka didn't open parachute kinda injured)by the elevator if forced to bail. Doesn't paint a pretty picture does it...




TK3997

Slightly cooler than a n00b

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22nd May 2004

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#52 16 years ago

[color=silver]The tail of even normal planes was also more then capable of killing a pilot trying to bail out of them. Getting out of any fighter in WW2 was a rather risky proposition. [/color]




mondogenerator

Wolfgaming.net *****istrator

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24th September 2003

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#53 16 years ago

http://www.zenoswarbirdvideos.com/P38.html

One of those videos, both original training films shows you how to bail out of a p38 without injury.




DuaL

GF Pwns Me!

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28th April 2004

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#54 16 years ago

They had to open the canopy, climb out and get onto the wing brfore they could safely bail .. sounds like fun no?




mondogenerator

Wolfgaming.net *****istrator

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24th September 2003

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#55 16 years ago

Its better then burning alive in the cockpit or crashing at a guess;)




schmoppa

Excited

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5th March 2004

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#56 16 years ago
PanzerAcegive me proof that a WWII P38 EVER reached the sound barrier, more likely than not the wings would have been ripped off of the fusalage and the pilot would have died, cuase at 700+ mph, no one is going to be jumping out of the plane. Also the Bell X-1 was the first plane to ever reach the sound barrier.

(nitpicking) It was the first to exceed the sound barrier. I thought plenty of planes hit the sound barrier, but were not aerodynamic enough to break it. I seem to remember watching old footage of planes breaking up in midair, unable to surpass that barrier. This is an old memory, however, so i could be wrong.




Sgt_Dude

I'm too cool to Post

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20th November 2003

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#57 16 years ago

Several planes reached or got near to it...however, the P38 did not break the sound barrier. It had a problem at 500+ mph where the gauge would break and give extremely exaggerated results. Meaning, in a dive if you go over 500, it might LOOK like 700+.




mondogenerator

Wolfgaming.net *****istrator

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24th September 2003

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#58 16 years ago

That happened on all planes as the instruments were unreliable past a certain point. At 500mph + the P38's main problem was the elavator suffering from compression which killed a number of pilots. No plane in WW2 reached the sound barrier or got near it. As I said, the critical mach number can be worked out for each planes wing (which is the limiting factor) and no plane got past 0.89 (thanks for the correction :) ) because no plane had a wing capable of letting them get to mach 1 and no plane carrier a propeller (yup, you need a supersonic prop) that would allow them to go to and past mach 1.




PacketlossPete

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29th February 2004

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#59 16 years ago
emonkies

I'm too cool to Post

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17th July 2003

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#60 16 years ago

PacketlossPeteWell looks like someone tried :)

http://aeroweb.brooklyn.cuny.edu/specs/republic/xf-84h.htm

Did you also read the effects of the supersonic shockwave had on the ground crew other than causing severe hearing problems?

The shockwaves caused spasms in the large intestines which resulted in the ground crew soiling themselves and the shockwave also caused hearing damage. And hearing protection didnt work as this was almost like a ultrasonic attack and acted directly through the tissue.