Let's learn to draw. 3 replies

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Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#1 6 years ago

No, I won't be teaching =p

Feel free to offer comments and corrections.

So, I thought this'd be a good way to waste a couple of evenings. I know bugger all about drawing so... we're obviously going to be fairly sucky starting off.

Anyway, starting off where we're starting off - stick figures.

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9599

Right so - only slightly better than nothing at all.

Tried holding the pencil down and just drawing in one fell swoop - which you can see at the base of the next picture.

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9600

But the main idea here was to use balls to outline the position of the bends in the main limbs and link those together.

Which sort of worked - and we got some milleage out of the idea here:

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9601

Well, the one at the top anyway.

But didn't seem to be giving us any energy in the picture.

So we went back to the stick figure here:

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9602

So, lessons learned after a half hour or so of screwing around:

  • Pencil really doesn't show up well in photographs. =p
  • Drawing without any sort of reference is difficult - finding references seems to be very 50-50.
  • Stick figures give you at best, a very limited sense of the ... weight/energy of a thing.
  • Join the dots style drawing - where you just stick in the extent of the limbs - gives better short term results but seems to top off very quickly.

Obviously the most easily fixed of those is going to be finding better references. So I think that's what we'll do when I pick this up next.




Museum

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28th October 2005

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#2 6 years ago

Some good starts here, it's a good idea to find some nice references. When I was working on my drawing I started looking at some basic shapes of things around me, like a cup, something like that. I'd draw these shapes as best I could, from different angles, to get to grips with transferring what I saw to the paper, and slowly worked up to more complex objects. This took a lot of time at first, but seemed to work pretty well, so you could give that a try if you wanted.

Drawing is fun, I might get my sketchbook out =p




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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#3 6 years ago

And we're back. As always 'Feel free to offer comments and corrections.' =p

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9634

Just basic cylinders. The difficult thing on cups seems to be getting the handle correct. I've got some goes at them I can't seem to find. Still, as long as you're moving the top curve down to keep it all in proportion there doesn't seem to be anything theoretically complex about them. The largest problems I had were getting straight lines for the sides and getting a thin enough line that I could convincingly do the inner lip of the thing.

Possibly drawing the cup above something else so that the perspectives all have to match would be more challenging. Shall have to try that at some point.

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9635

The back of this was actually obscured. I've got it sitting at a slightly different angle now but the main difficulties were that curve on the top and getting the two lines that provide the reference for the depth/angle it's sitting at in the Y/roll axis in the right place. (Which they're not.) It's one of those things where you'd like to be able to reach into the paper and just pick it up and rotate it a little so that it matches the perspective you wanted. =p

This is the main one though.

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9633

Not because it's particularly good, (I'm not sure whether it looks off to me because the drawing is massively off of the reference or because no-one in their right mind would kick like that. Likely both,) but because we've finally found some decent reference pics.

Which we'll now share: [Nudity warning, if you don't change the default settings.]

:) So we can go do some of that next time.

Still haven't laid our grubby little mits on a scanner. I hear rumours that a nearby firm is going to throw a number of their photographic scanners away because it costs more to get them recertified than it does to buy new ones though. So I'll be down there having a look at some point =p




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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#4 6 years ago

Not much this week. Days seem to be going awfully quickly lately.

picture.php?albumid=623&pictureid=9674

Referring back to the first post, going from the first crappy stick figure to a fuller picture - even to a more energetic stick figure - was fairly easy. But, having played with stick figures for a while now, I'm not sure how much they actually translate into underlying skills to create anything more.

It's easy to get a skeleton and then roughly outline the shapes around it. But are you really getting any sense of the weight of the object? Any real sense of its physicality? Or are you just applying a set of low-level skills that produce a reasonably image without actually adding anything to your overall impression of forms?

Part of it, I suspect, is just that I'm used to thinking in - what I suppose - you'd call architectural or engineering terms. You move this set of polygons down here and if the arm is the wrong length you move them until they're right. When you're doing things in 3d you have a lot of wiggle room - and all angles and distances are easily compared on a grid anyway. It's a rather different mindset to looking at something and just feeling that it's wrong, or doesn't match up.

Anyway, the image on the left was drawing - pretty much - by hanging the rest off an internal skeleton. The one on the right was drawn by bouncing a sequence of curves along more or less the edge of the body. On the one hand there isn't a single smooth line defining the energy of the pose, on the other there don't seem to be that many smooth lines in it to begin with- unless you wanted to take a rough average and run a skeleton down the middle again. :uhm: Torso's still much too long.