Getting YouTube Subscribers? 7 replies

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#1 6 years ago

How do most of you who have YouTube Gaming channels get subscribers? I feel like most sites that actually allow YouTube channels to be advertised, aren't a good source of getting subscribers. It seems they tend to get overlooked. So I want to hear how you all have come gathered subscribers!




>Omen<

Modern Warfare

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1st January 2005

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#2 6 years ago

It helps to try and make your channel look appealing, but of course the main thing is having videos that are interesting to watch, and more importantly, posting them where the content is more likely to be appealing. For instance you wouldn't want to post race game videos of DiRT 3 on FileFront and expect to get a lot of hits. You're far more likely to get those hits on the Codemasters DiRT 3 forum, which has lots of rally fans from all over the world.

Unfortunately as far as channel appearance goes, YouTube's channel editing options are far less robust than they used to be. I only see an option for background color or picture now. There used to be background, foreground and text color options.

Another thing you can do before deciding what videos to make is to search the net first to see what videos of that game (or whatever you're recording) are already posted. Then you have a better idea whether what you're offering will be unique or more challenging in some way. Dime a dozen videos that have similar content are often passed over by potential viewers.

For instance I did a very challenging side quest called Ancestral Worship in Skyrim after finishing the story. I was playing on Master and using just a War Axe and no potions or enchantments. Out of curiosity, after completing it I watched a few YT vids others had made of it and only one mentioned he was doing it on master and he used a bow from a distance, which is far less challenging. Another also used a bow with a follower tagging along.

I didn't find ONE video showing a tough melee battle on that quest, so I thought it might be an interesting video to offer. I may go back and make one if I can find a save point just prior to that quest. Be forewarned that while some will recognize well fought challenges, others will criticize you as if you're stupid for not using easier methods, even if in the description you emphasize that you were intentionally amping up the challenge.

Another way to add appeal to your videos is to make them cinematically appealing in some way vs just recording footage. This can go against you if you lolly gag too much with boring content though. So if you want to add cinematic touches, try and glean as much as you can about it and watch other people's vids that use such features and are highly rated before you dabble into it too much.

Lastly, the raw technicality of the basics of capture and compression matter a lot. No one likes to see great content ruined because the creator of the vid was using a mediocre system with too high game settings for Fraps to handle without boatloads of lag. There's a better alternative to Fraps now called DxTory, which allows the game to play at full FPS while you capture at a lower FPS if you use it's RawCap feature and have more than one HDD. I've been able to record games like Metro 2033 at full frame 1280x720 on a mere GTS 250 with no lag.

On compression, make sure you use a pretty good codec and devote enough bitrate for the resolution you captured at, especially since the YouTube Flash based viewer somewhat degrades the image quality. It's good to test a short 1-5 minute segment before compressing and uploading an entire 15 minute video, to make sure it looks good first. All the better if the video fits the viewer frame perfectly.

If your system can handle it, 1280x720p full frame is a good way to capture for YouTube. There is a 1080p option if you have a killer rig, but many people skip 1080p viewing on YT, as the buffer time can be horrible. A res of 720p can look good without requiring upwards 10,000 Kbps bitrate, depending on the size they view it in.




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#3 6 years ago

Great page and website!! The more interactive you can be, on your page, and throughout Facebook the better your page will do. :) Keep up the good work..




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#4 6 years ago

Thank you for the helpful advice, Omen. I was wondering the same thing.




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#5 6 years ago

Very pleased to find this site. Thanks for taking the time to share this.




Caprica-Six

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#6 6 years ago

Make sure to talk to the other people broadcasting the same game and check out there channels, having watched a lot of mw3 content, video uploaders often post each others videos with a commentary and say thanks to so and so for letting me use his video you guys should check out his channel....just an idea don't burn any bridges.




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#7 6 years ago

Unfortunately as far as channel appearance goes, YouTube's channel editing options are far less robust than they used to be.i only see the background color option




Bubbleteatroopa

I got them crazies.

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#8 6 years ago

I had a gaming channel for awhile and I actually got a fair number of subscribers (though nothing like any of the big channels). What I found out is that the video you put out must be of a descent quality as in no extremely low res picture, shit audio or music that would only be enjoyed by some and not all. As for the subscriber thing, I often found just spending time on youtube and commenting on videos and/or responding to comments others had made created somewhat of a small group of subscribers who decided to click on my name and check my channel out while they replied to my comments. Granted, not everyone did that but out of 50 comments I made I think about 5 people would actually visit my page which might mean 1 subscriber out of 100 (a guess). I also found that posting relavent video responses that were of a good quality to other peoples popular videos was another good way, in one case I got about 5,000 views on one video in a rather short time for posting it in the video response section of a video with about 25,000 views. I also found that when making gaming videos in particular, sometimes making a video on a unique aspect of a game such as how to use mod tools or something along those lines managed to gather more positive response and subscriptions than just a gameplay video, even if the tutorial video had considerably less views (though it needs to be good quality). I also should mention that posting your videos on certain forums that are related to the game (such as a big clan forums or modding forums) and are related to one of the topics being debated and could prehapse help out can be a big plus and might gather a few subscribers. Another thing is getting someone of an already well established gaming channel to mention you or post a link to your channel on their channel can garner LOADS of subscribers, though getting one of the big channels to mention your videos is sometimes a rather difficult task and chances are low. I found that asking well established but smaller channels (300-1000 subscribers) was a much better way of recieving subscriptions (don't be afraid to make a deal with the other channel and post his channel on your channel and vice versa). Just remember to have good quality material that another channel would want to be associated with, and make the channel layour professional and clean.