How will multiplayer work for recent AAA releases? 6 replies

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random_soldier1337

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#1 2 years ago

Basically, what I mean to say is, as far as I've managed to be informed, given that most triple AAA releases within this decade have little to no options for local multiplayer, not counting the bajillion generic shooters because I don't keep up with them, how would multiplayer work for them when the servers are shut down inevitably some, at most, 10-15 years down the line?

Is there even any point in buying any recent games for the multiplayer? It feels like you shouldn't be paying for something with a definite lifetime when the product one buys is for use over an indefinite time period, limited by personal circumstance.




NeoRanger

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#2 2 years ago

random_soldier1337 Basically, what I mean to say is, as far as I've managed to be informed, given that most triple AAA releases within this decade have little to no options for local multiplayer, not counting the bajillion generic shooters because I don't keep up with them, how would multiplayer work for them when the servers are shut down inevitably some, at most, 10-15 years down the line?

Is there even any point in buying any recent games for the multiplayer? It feels like you shouldn't be paying for something with a definite lifetime when the product one buys is for use over an indefinite time period, limited by personal circumstance.

It has been apparent that gaming has been trying to create and appeal to its own smaller niches, which used to be a unified audience in the past. It's for good reason, considering the amount of titles and developers out there, because it allows developers to survive and creates more choices with more focus and larger creative freedom.

So, a multiplayer-only game no longer exists to appeal to core gamers of the past, but also gamers (old and new) that just like multiplayer. Online-only has become its own genre, not unlike how MMORPGs and MOBAs are popping up left and right, despite the major financial risk a company's taking in producing and sustaining them. It's not too different than, say, Unreal Tournament, the difference is that there is now a market (in the making) specifically for just one kind of gamer that in the past would've only played UT, but wouldn't have touched Unreal.

We've seen how it will work; the question you ask has, so far, been answered via the countless reiterations of online shooters that sell multiple copies on a literally yearly basis. That specific audience will keep on buying new releases of multiplayer-only titles, even if they're destined to die, because they wager they have got everything they can out of the experience with the older titles. Furthermore, companies themselves make a point to not move away from tried and true licenses specifically for that reason; sure, you could still play Modern Warfare 2, but if you're part of that particular audience, you have nothing to lose if/when the MW2 servers go down since Infinity Warfare 15 is out and provides the same core experience with a little more polish.




VFrieden

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#3 2 years ago

Paying $60 (plus DLC) for a game that has a limited lifetime does suck, but 10-15 years is also a fairly good amount of time, and most people probably won't care that the game they spent that money on so many years ago will be having its servers shut down soon. I suppose it's all a matter of principle.

But like Neo said, the trend of AAA multiplayer games has been to reiterate much of the same old each year, and that's not going to change anytime soon. It pretty much comes down to the customer having to understand this fact and acknowledge that the multiplayer game they're considering may not be playable so many years down the road. A brand new video game costs a significant amount of money, but most would evidently find that it's not an outlandish price to be paying annually.

So basically...is there a point in buying these games? That's all up to the customer.


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Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#4 2 years ago

You can always go to indie, go to games that have had very long shelf lives like TF2, or go to companies that don't release yearly iterative franchises.  Not every AAA pub has gone with the yearly-release model for their MP games.

What I'd like to see not die though is client-based servers.  Company support won't matter if the community can run servers after the devs have stopped caring and/or shut down their servers long ago.




Serio VIP Member

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#5 2 years ago

They won't work. Plain and simple.

Old games like Dark Souls are already being ditched by publishers, in order to force people to move onto more recent installments. The best part? Dark Souls uses a very cheap solution to multiplayer; peer to peer. They only need a server to match people, not to share data. And even that is too much for them.

So no, there's no point in buying a game for multiplayer these days, unless it allows for dedicated hosting or you're fine with its limited life expectation. 




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#6 2 years ago

Or you want to shell out hundreds of dollars for each installment.

Another victim of the business-driven AAA market.




Strazdas

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#7 2 years ago

Most modern multiplayer games are peer-to-peer, so they dont even have servers to begin with, only one master-server run by the developer/publisher, who dictates how long multiplayer lives.

the purpose of buying a game for multiplayer hasnt changed. They never lasted forever.  When the community dies the multiplayer does anyway. Even if you ignore all this, it is still a product like any other. When you buy a console you dont expect it to last forever. you expect it to last till they release new ones.