NES Classic - Anyone actually gone for it? 7 replies

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Mikey Über Admin

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#1 1 year ago

Serio's topic This is now for sale on Amazon, though they've reportedly disabled the One Click Buy button to give everyone a fair chance. That's how much demand they expect.

So, has anyone picked up this? Any expectations if you're going to pick it up?

Personally, if I were to pick it up it would be more for the novelty than anything else, and right now? I can't afford novelty.


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FileTrekker Über Admin

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#2 1 year ago

I really don't get why this particular one is getting so much ranting and raving, we've had very similar products to this for the Mega Drive, Neo Geo X,  and so on and so forth.

I guess because it's the first Nintendo licensed one, people are going nuts over it.

I promise you now people will find it's simply an Android / Linux-based OS that is running a bad emulator, and the buzz will die down fast.


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Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#3 1 year ago

As someone who used to be something of a retro console collector before I stopped giving a shit (I still have everything from the Master System to the Dreamcast, and a bunch of others, though), I don't know how successful the NES Classic will be outside of people misguidedly buying it as a Christmas present for the retro collectors in their lives.

This is because there are two main types of retro gamer:

  • The hardcore retro gamer (often also a collector). These people insist on owning the original hardware and software, either as part of an ongoing collection or because they say there is a kind of 'purity' to the experience. We're about as mental as people who collect vinyl records in that regard. We are unlikely to buy a remade console ourselves, because we would much rather have the original hardware, and don't find any worth in collecting 'new' versions. The one exception would be a console with a functioning cartridge port, as that would allow us to prolong the lifespan of the older hardware for casual playing.
  • The nostalgic gamer. These are people like FileTrekker, who enjoy retro games, or people who just fancy revisiting their youth, but in neither case are they particularly fussed about digging out SCART leads or faffing around with cartridges. They're happy to play them on emulators, and often indeed prefer to do so as there is less inconvenience and often a better picture to boot.

I make no value judgements on either, but at the same time neither of these two types are particularly likely to want to buy a NES Classic. The fact that it doesn't even have a cartridge port makes it an anathema to the hardcore retro gamers, because it can't even be used as a 'stand-in' console to prevent wear and tear on the old hardware, and it has no value as part of a collection because... well, it's not an original. And the latter group most likely already have perfectly serviceable emulators on their PCs, or have picked up the titles they want on the Virtual Console or LIVE Marketplace, or whatever.

So yeah. Misguided Christmas present at best, I think.




FileTrekker Über Admin

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#4 1 year ago

I personally think these things are okay, for the casual gamer who isn't technically savvy enough to faff around with emulators, they just aren't that new.

I agree the market is overestimated though.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Mikouen VIP Member

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#5 1 year ago

The fatal flaw was announcing them so far ahead of releasing them. For me, at least, the novelty wore off during the wait.

On the one hand, having a familiar shell in a reasonably portable format is a good thing. On the other hand, I'm just too old to really give a shit any more, and anyone in a younger demographic is probably too young to appreciate 8-bit games that much.

Get a £25 Bluetooth controller for your phablet and you're pretty much sorted for the retro gaming, really.


I don't know how, and I don't know why, but this is totally Sheep's fault.



FileTrekker Über Admin

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#6 1 year ago
"Mr. Matt"These are people like FileTrekker, who enjoy retro games, or people who just fancy revisiting their youth, but in neither case are they particularly fussed about digging out SCART leads or faffing around with cartridges. They're happy to play them on emulators, and often indeed prefer to do so as there is less inconvenience and often a better picture to boot.

I still own a Mega Drive, Mega CD, Dreamcast, etc. etc.

Admittedly I don't plug them into a TV or anything currently though, because I have no room, but I would do given the space.   


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Superfluous Curmudgeon VIP Member

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#7 1 year ago
"Mikouen"8-bit games

What are those?

That's pretty much where I stand. I remember seeing friends play those pixelated, 2D games when I was a kid, but I never played  them. Parents never got us gaming systems and we never asked. So one way or another, I don't care. As a couple of other have said though, it doesn't make a lot of sense for the tech savvy. Either grab a controller and play the game with an emulator, or get your hands on an old system and play true retro. The real audience will probably consist of those who are driven by nostalgia but don't want to put the effort into finding/fuddling with an original console to get it to work, or figure out how to get an emulator and controller solution up and running; the person who wants to plug and play with minimal  hassle or thinking.




Mikouen VIP Member

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#8 1 year ago

Just so happens that over the weekend, ThinkGeek ran a promo. Add the NES Classic to your wishlist, and on Monday they'd select random people to ship one to.

The amount they were giving away was basically, in their words, "until [we] run out of stock".


I don't know how, and I don't know why, but this is totally Sheep's fault.