wh40k 12 replies

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hj59

I don't spend enough time here

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28th July 2010

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#1 8 years ago

I've played allthe wh40k games inc the fps fire warrior. i enjoyed all of them, so i looked forward to wh40k2. problem is, you need the net to play it. this hacks me off,why do game developers expect everyone to have the internet? why alienate those of us inthe gaming community if we dont, or cannot afford it the only access i have is the public library or my mobile phone, which gives me free internet




Vasili

Lurking.

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2nd October 2006

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#2 8 years ago

Because they don't like you




MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

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7th December 2003

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#3 8 years ago

[COLOR="Black"]Probably because it enables them to make more money. Less pirated games, people get used to online platforms where you can easily spend money on DLC and you can easily collect tons of information about your customers. The small number of customers who don't have an internet connection at home probably don't matter.

I dislike this development as well. Video game publishers/developers specialize in screwing over customers these days. I'd prefer if they invested their energy into making better games.[/COLOR]




hj59

I don't spend enough time here

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28th July 2010

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#4 8 years ago

Oh crap, i still feel screwed over. I know developers need to stamp out piracy, but these guys are clever, im sure they can stop piracy without persecuting those of us who cant afford the net




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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8th October 2006

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#5 8 years ago

Game developers don't count on people like you. They figure that if you're rich enough to buy a game you're rich enough to afford internet access, even if you're half way up the Himalayas (you're probably not, but for all you know, someone might). For you it may be really, really annoying, but for most people it's an annoyance on principle only; chances are if someone buys the game they'll have internet access.




Mihail VIP Member

President of Novistrana

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19th January 2003

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#6 8 years ago
MrFancypants;5368364[COLOR=Black]Probably because it enables them to make more money. Less pirated games[/COLOR]

Lol no it doesn't, even Assassin's creed 2 which tries to store games on a online server has been beat by offline servers. These type of games that forces you to be online punishes actual customers instead of the people illegally downloading them.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

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7th December 2003

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#7 8 years ago
Mihail;5368646Lol no it doesn't, even Assassin's creed 2 which tries to store games on a online server has been beat by offline servers. These type of games that forces you to be online punishes actual customers instead of the people illegally downloading them.

[COLOR=Black] The piracy thing is one of the intentions behind it anyways. Whether it works is another question. If you look at the popularity of online activations and similar schemes it seems as if it is the best option the gaming industry can come up with ("best" from the industry point of view, obviously it isn't a lot of fun for the customers).[/COLOR]




Jeff Über Admin

I am a mean boss ⬆️⬆️⬇️⬇️⬅️➡️⬅️➡️??

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#8 8 years ago
Mihail;5368646Lol no it doesn't, even Assassin's creed 2 which tries to store games on a online server has been beat by offline servers. These type of games that forces you to be online punishes actual customers instead of the people illegally downloading them.

A better example would be bioshock. That game literally would. not. run. for a large group of folks who legitimately bought the game, but the people that pirated it gloated at how easy it was for them to play it without issue.

I do see the perspective of the game companies though. They see pirated games as lost revenue and want to stop it. There's nothing wrong with that and they have absolutely every right to do so.

Some companies are starting to get it right. I know that the original posters gripe was the online verification method. Honestly, that doesn't bother me as long as you remove the other anti-piracy schemes. Get rid of securom, get rid of cd check. Ubisoft went waaay overboard with Assassin's Creed 2 making you play it only when online. A simple check when launching the game checking the cdkey against the database should suffice. That can even be done while the game is initially launching. If it cannot verify, it shuts down the program. This also means there's far less of a bandwidth issue as it's only a small amount of information transferred instead of a constant stream like ubisoft demands. That's the limit I would go with it. Anything beyond that is a waste of money that you're putting on the consumer. Create a game with less intrusive protection methods and watch how much more you sell. You're going to have piracy, deal with it. Focus instead on revenue lost and focus more on how to increase revenue through other avenues available to you.

bleh.. /rant off


Product Manager | GameFront.com




Serio VIP Member

The Dane

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11th November 2006

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#9 8 years ago

Didn't Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory have such a measure? When you first ran the setup, it would check the CD key with an online database. If it existed, you'd be allowed to install the game. If not, you were presented with a nice little dialogue telling you that you're either cheap, or that there was an error with the code. Some game developers, using Paradox Interactive as an example here, don't even use any proper DRM and they're doing fine. Maybe it's because their games cater to a different part of the market, or that they have a solid and loyal customer base, but the only use for the CD key they give you is to register on their forums. That does mean that without a legitimate CD key, you won't get support nor access to their mod database or patches. It's a functioning system, and I haven't seen any complaints about it at all.




Granyaski VIP Member

High as a kite

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29th May 2008

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#10 8 years ago
Serio;5368685Didn't Splinter Cell: Chaos Theory have such a measure? When you first ran the setup, it would check the CD key with an online database. If it existed, you'd be allowed to install the game. If not, you were presented with a nice little dialogue telling you that you're either cheap, or that there was an error with the code.

I had that with other games as well when I first moved house and was reinstalling some old classics....It pissed me off so badly that I ended up selling most of the games.

by the way-fire warrior SUCKS




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