Русский Тред (Russian Language Thread) 23 replies

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Pb2Au

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#1 8 years ago

As far as I know, there are no threads for learning foreign languages on GamingForums. Which is a shame, because it's a passion of mine. Therefore, let this be a place where people who know or want to learn Russian can gather, learn a bit, and practice language skills. Давайте, друзья, говорить на русском! Кто здесь говорит по-самому прекрасному языку в мире? Наши Правила [Our Rules] Если Вы можете пишите, пожалуйста, правильно. Трудно понять неправильно написано слова, особенно трудно начинающим. [If you can, please write correctly. It is difficult to understand incorrectly spelled words, especially difficult for beginners.] Будьте вежливы и полезны. Все совершают ошибки. [Be polite and helpful. Everyone makes mistakes.] Useful links: Online Russian keyboard: Russian keyboard on-line - Virtual, On-screen Russian Keyboard Basic lessons flash page: Russian Language Helper




Pb2Au

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#2 8 years ago

Наши Правила [Our Rules]

Если вы можете пишите, пожалуйста, правильно. Трудно понять неправильно написано слова, особенно трудно начинающим. [If you can, please write correctly. It is difficult to understand incorrectly spelled words, especially difficult for beginners.]

Будьте вежливы и полезны. Все совершают ошибки. [Be polite and helpful. Everyone makes mistakes.]

Useful links: Online Russian keyboard: Russian keyboard on-line - Virtual, On-screen Russian Keyboard Basic lessons flash page: Russian Language Helper




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

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#3 8 years ago

Sounds like a good idea. I wonder how many language threads we can have running?

Как хорошая идея! Сколько языковых нитей мы можем иметь одновременно?

Just a tip, try to have your post state its content in both English and whichever language the thread's devoted to (in this case, Russian), as we would like to actually learn the language(s).




Flash525

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#4 8 years ago

I've always thought Russian would be an interesting language to learn. I wouldn't mind giving French another try too. I did French and Spanish back in school, but was never really any good at it; to be honest, don't think I really cared back then.

Would be interesting to get into though I think, just a whole new language to remember...




Pb2Au

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#5 8 years ago

Some Notes on Russian As opposed to most western languages which are descended from Latin, Russian is descended from Greek. It uses the Cyrillic alphabet, a modified Greek alphabet developed by St.s Cyril and Methodius for converting the Slavs to Orthodox Christianity. Structurally, Russian has quite a few things which make it significantly different from English. 1) Russian has no articles! No 'the,' 'el,' 'la,' 'der,' 'das,' or 'die.' You just state the noun and the context determines whether you're referring to it specifically or in general. 2) In the present tense, Russian does not have a word for 'is.' The verb, быть, is used in past tense and future tense but omitted in present tense. It is replaced in text by a dash. [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] -[COLOR=blue] студент[/COLOR]. [COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] am a [COLOR=blue]student[/COLOR]. 3) Russian is a cased language. This means that each noun, pronoun, and adjective is modified depending on its use in the sentence. You might know that German has four cases: [COLOR=blue]Nominative[/COLOR], [COLOR=red]Genitive[/COLOR], [COLOR=lime]Dative[/COLOR], and [COLOR=yellow]Accusative[/COLOR]. Russian has six! English used to have cases; you can still see traces of them in our pronouns. English Cases: [COLOR=blue]She[/COLOR] is a [COLOR=blue]girl[/COLOR] ([COLOR=blue]Nominative[/COLOR], 'she' is the subject of the sentence) [COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] love [COLOR=yellow]her[/COLOR] ([COLOR=yellow]Accusative[/COLOR], 'her' is the direct object of the sentence) Give the [COLOR=blue]book[/COLOR] to [COLOR=lime]her[/COLOR] ([COLOR=lime]Dative[/COLOR], 'her' is the indirect object of the sentence) That [COLOR=blue]book[/COLOR] is [COLOR=red]her's[/COLOR] ([COLOR=red]Genitive[/COLOR], which can replace any statement of possession. It leaves the strongest trace in modern English because all of our possessives use 's: [COLOR=red]Pb2Au's[/COLOR] [COLOR=blue]thread[/COLOR]; the [COLOR=red]man's[/COLOR] [COLOR=blue]wallet[/COLOR]; [COLOR=red]Custer's[/COLOR] [COLOR=blue]Last Stand[/COLOR]. That right there is genitive) Russian Cases: [COLOR=blue]Стол[/COLOR] - [COLOR=blue]хороший[/COLOR] ([COLOR=blue]Nominative[/COLOR]) [The [COLOR=blue]table[/COLOR] is [COLOR=blue]good[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] кидаю [COLOR=yellow]стол[/COLOR] ([COLOR=yellow]Accusative[/COLOR]) [[COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] throw the [COLOR=yellow]table[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Цвет[/COLOR] [COLOR=red]стола[/COLOR] ([COLOR=red]Genitive[/COLOR]) [The [COLOR=blue]color[/COLOR] of the [COLOR=red]table[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Книга[/COLOR] на [COLOR=darkorchid]столе[/COLOR] ([COLOR=darkorchid]Prepositional[/COLOR]) [The [COLOR=blue]book[/COLOR] is on the [COLOR=darkorchid]table[/COLOR]] [COLOR=lime]Столу[/COLOR] - [COLOR=blue]пять лет [/COLOR]([COLOR=lime]Dative[/COLOR]) [The table is five years old; lit. 'There are [COLOR=blue]five years[/COLOR] to the [COLOR=lime]table[/COLOR]'] [COLOR=blue]Часы[/COLOR] над [COLOR=orange]столом[/COLOR] ([COLOR=orange]Instrumental[/COLOR]) [The [COLOR=blue]clock[/COLOR] above the [COLOR=orange]table[/COLOR]] You can see that all the cases are permutations of '[COLOR=blue]стол[/COLOR]' 4) As a result of this, syntax doesn't matter! [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] [COLOR=yellow]её[/COLOR] люблю [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] люблю [COLOR=yellow]её[/COLOR] [COLOR=yellow]Её[/COLOR] [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] люблю [COLOR=yellow]Её[/COLOR] люблю [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] Люблю [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] [COLOR=yellow]её[/COLOR] Люблю [COLOR=yellow]её[/COLOR] [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] All have the exact same literal meaning! Imagine the effect of this on poetry: you can fit all sorts of things into meters and rhyme schemes. You can draw emphasis to certain parts of the sentence the same way we do in speech (I love her vs. I love her). You can paint insane pictures: "Утонул в [COLOR=darkorchid]середине[/COLOR] [COLOR=red]голубого[/COLOR] [COLOR=blue]Икар[/COLOR] [COLOR=red]моря[/COLOR]" (Drowned in the [COLOR=darkorchid]middle[/COLOR] of the [COLOR=red]blue[/COLOR] [COLOR=blue]Icarus[/COLOR] [COLOR=red]sea[/COLOR]) 5) Russian only has three tenses! No subjunctives or progressives or simples. Those are dealt with through verbal aspects, which is covered in point 6 6) This concept is 99% foreign to English speakers, but Russian has aspect pairs of verbs: imperfective / perfective. This is oversimplified, but the aspect often depends on completion or duration. For example "I flew" vs. "I was flying," where with "I flew" the emphasis is on completion and is therefore perfective. For "While I was flying..." the emphasis is on something else. It is a lead-in to some other verb ("While I was flying I saw a friend") and the action is ongoing. In Russian: лететь / полететь [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] полетел в [COLOR=yellow]Москву[/COLOR]. Когда [COLOR=blue]я[/COLOR] летел [COLOR=blue]я[/COLOR] пил [COLOR=yellow]водку[/COLOR] [[COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] flew to [COLOR=yellow]Moscow[/COLOR]. When [COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] was flying, [COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] drank [COLOR=yellow]vodka[/COLOR].] Most aspect pairs have standard forms to indicate aspect. A huge chunk of them, for example, create perfective with the prefix 'по-'. Of course, as with all languages, the more common a verb is the more irregular you can expect it to be!




Schofield VIP Member

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#6 8 years ago

This has been posted in Russian, but I've made it so it looks like English to you.




Lindale Forum Mod

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#7 8 years ago

[COLOR=orange][COLOR=red]России-замечательная страна![/COLOR] Russia is a wonderful country[/COLOR]


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Pb2Au

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#8 8 years ago

Отлично, Линдайл! А 'России' - существительное в родительном или предложном падеж и 'замечательная страна' в именительном падеже. [Great, Lindale! But 'России' is a noun in genitive or prepositional case and 'замечательная страна' is in nominative case] [COLOR=blue]Россия[/COLOR] - [COLOR=blue]замечательная страна [/COLOR][[COLOR=blue]Russia[/COLOR] is a [COLOR=blue]remarkable country[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] люблю [COLOR=yellow]Россию[/COLOR] [[COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] love [COLOR=yellow]Russia[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Граница[/COLOR] [COLOR=red]России[/COLOR] [The [COLOR=blue]borders[/COLOR] of [COLOR=red]Russia[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Я[/COLOR] живу в [COLOR=darkorchid]России[/COLOR] [[COLOR=blue]I[/COLOR] live in [COLOR=darkorchid]Russia[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Подарок[/COLOR] [COLOR=lime]России[/COLOR] [[COLOR=blue]Gifts[/COLOR] for [COLOR=lime]Russia[/COLOR]] [COLOR=blue]Отношение[/COLOR] с [COLOR=orange]Россией[/COLOR] [[COLOR=blue]Relationship[/COLOR] with [COLOR=orange]Russia[/COLOR]] Always aim for agreement with your nouns. Usually they rhyme or sound alike. In 'is' statements it's simple: everything is in nominative!

Crazy Wolf;5420664Sounds like a good idea. Как хорошая идея!

Similarly, Crazy, it would be 'Какая хорошая идея!' 'Как' means 'how.' 'Какой' is an adjective which means 'what' as in 'what an [adjective] [noun]' Как дела? - How are you doing? Какой хороший язык! - What a good language! Какая хорошая идея! - What a good idea! Какое хорошое окно! - What a good window! Bonus: Russian Army (Paratroopers) Rap!




Pb2Au

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#9 8 years ago

So, Why Learn Russian? Russian is a hard language for English speakers to learn. The US Department of Defense ranks it as a Category II Language, requiring 44 weeks for someone who already knows multiple languages and devotes over 40 hours per week to gain proficiency. (Source / источник) However, the payoff is massive. Why? 1) Russian is a Badass Language Which is Fun to Learn Imagine: You're sitting in a bar, and someone says they speak Spanish fluently. Does anyone look up? No. You then mention you speak Russian. Instant attention. Why? Because Russian sounds awesome. Cool people speak Russian. It's a mysterious and action-packed part of the globe to westerners. 2) Learning Russian PAYS The US government has a list of languages it wants its citizens to learn. Japanese, Mandarin, Arabic, and Russian are consistent members of that list. Why? Because learning those languages is a rare skill. So rare, in fact, that you can get paid to learn the language!! Critical Language Scholarship Program Even if you don't need the money, being fluent in Russian is an excellent addition to any resume, especially in business, engineering, or military degrees. 3) Beautiful Women Speak Russian What do Anna Kournikova, Anna Chapman, hundreds of models, and most of these women have in common? Two things: they're gorgeous, and they speak Russian. Ever since WWII, women have outnumbered men in Russia and what's worse, many Russian men are alcoholics with an insanely short lifespan (seriously). If you're don't care about your wallet, at least think of some of the other contents of your pants!




Lindale Forum Mod

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#10 8 years ago

[COLOR=orange]Here is something else from the dictionary.[/COLOR] [COLOR=orange][/COLOR] [COLOR=orange]What about [COLOR=red]"Мне нужен врач." (I need a doctor.)[/COLOR][/COLOR]


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