Academic Journals and Articles 2 replies

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Andron Taps Forum Mod

Faktrl is Best Pony

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#1 1 year ago

Being in university means you are given access to all sorts of scholarly works to bolster your claims on research papers and projects.  This is obviously part of the fees you pay, but I've noticed most public portals will often charge for access to a scholarly paper, and some of those only rent them out.  Is it just me or is this a very bad way of doing things?  In an age of information overload and 24/7 access, why would you want to deny the public access to works that could truly educate them on current events and scientific research?  Is it really a threat to the integrity of the researchers or their credentials, i.e. plagiarism, or is there something else I'm missing here?


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



MrFancypants Forum Admin

The Bad

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#2 1 year ago

There are a couple of publishing companies that basically keep that market hostage. Researchers want to publish in the big journals, the big journals belong to the big publishers. So the researchers are offered great deal: either hand over their work for free to the publisher and lose all rights to it or get published in some crappy journal. The big publishers sell the journals to universities (i.e. government institutions that don't care whether they pay a reasonable price) and build databases which they can also sell to universities.

It depends a bit on the discipline, but in some areas open-access journals are increasingly popular. The articles are free to access, authors usually have to pay for publication of their article though.

The traditional publishers claim that their peer-review system leads to superior quality and that is why the fees are justified (the argument being that anyone can get published if you only have to pay a fee). The way the peer-review system works is that an editor takes a submission and sends it to some other researchers who review it for free because being friendly with the big journals kind of helps if you want to publish there yourself.

Some open-access journals have a pretty good quality by now, which attracts better people for peer reviews, so not everything submitted is published. So you can find very good work in there without having to pay ridiculous access fees. The big publishers are fighting back but I really hope they lose, it is an awfully crappy mafia system they maintain.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#3 1 year ago

You've just confirmed some of my darkest fears :p

I couldn't agree more with you in the hopes that the big publishing rackets finally hit the brakes on their gravy train.  There's so much information out there that students need in order to learn and practice developing their own research, but putting it under lock and key like some kind of shadowbroker is totally antithetical to any sort of education system.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.