Alienware Gaming Console! 10 replies

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#1 8 years ago

What if Alienware was considering producing a gaming console that included a portable gaming device?

The portable gaming device would allow users to continue playing the exact same game (including online games) they were playing on the console when the users have to leave the console. The portable gaming device would also have the ability to run other programs, connect to the internet, and be able to connect to any screen with a cord (like at a hotel).

This product would run on a Google Operating System.

Thoughts? I would love feedback and opinions on this idea!

(I am college student and this is my class project)




Mastershroom VIP Member

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#2 8 years ago

The system would have to be pretty limited in capability if a handheld version were to run the same stuff as the actual console.




MoreGun89

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#3 8 years ago

It'd be interesting, would be limited though, suggest it run off of a generic controller (you should preprogram it into the system (for the console games) otherwise you'd pretty much be programming a heavy duty multifaceted emulator. With some refinement, I think it might be an excellent concept.


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Queef Richards

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#4 8 years ago

Ok, mr. "college student" (alienware employee looking for opinions) I think it would be great if there were good games for it and if it had free online and was fun.




Showd0wN

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#5 8 years ago

I think it would be terrible, mainly because alienware are known for their poor design choices and weak build quality. I wouldn't touch it with a bargepole.




Mastershroom VIP Member

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#6 8 years ago
Showd0wN;5425039I think it would be terrible, mainly because alienware are known for their poor design choices and weak build quality. I wouldn't touch it with a bargepole.

Have you actually used any of their new models since they merged with Dell a couple years ago? I gotta say, they've really cleaned their act up. Sure, it's expensive as all hell, but you really get what you pay for.




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#7 8 years ago
This product would run on a Google Operating System.

Doomed.

Let us first consider the two available "Google Operating Systems", both based on the (vastly inferior, but free of charge) Linux kernel. Both are famous - Amongst other things - For having vastly better alternatives that are entrenched in desktop environments, and forced in mobile environments.

First off, "Android", a second-rate mobile phone operating system launched about two years ago. In the absence of WP7 and the long-noted decline of BlackBerry-based phones, Android gained some sales in the US - Particularly due to the iPhone's single carrier availability. In Europe, the iPhone dominates by a huge margin (Based on user agents, which is the fairest test I can come up with for which phones are actually being used)

The other operating system is "ChromeOS", I'd again call this a second-rate operating system, were it much of an operating system at all. It's more akin to a thin client that runs a browser, and doesn't appear to have a sensible market to sell to. In short, it's everything we've had for the past 15 years, after everything is taken out of it.

On a more general note, one of the main issues with hardware on any operating system is that of drivers. Whilst this isn't as much of an issue on dedicated devices such as games consoles, the kernel API is rather abysmal with these operating systems. I have experience with a range of them, and unless there've been significant chances to the (Relatively static) driver API for these operating systems, it's almost more trouble than building a dedicated operating system like everyone else does.

The portable gaming device would allow users to continue playing the exact same game (including online games) they were playing on the console when the users have to leave the console. The portable gaming device would also have the ability to run other programs, connect to the internet, and be able to connect to any screen with a cord (like at a hotel).

As stated, this would have some severe limitations. The most obvious way of doing this would be akin to something like OnLive, which effectively streams the game to you. Perhaps in whichever country you hail from, connections are fast enough that this is possible, but it's hardly the case everywhere in the world. They would receive an (even more) abysmal experience on the handheld device than on the console, which I've picked apart already.

The other way would be to literally run the binary on the limited storage capacity of the handheld device, which either makes your theoretical device prohibitively expensive, forces the games to be of low graphical quality (Not everyone is John Carmack), and probably causes the device to overheat due to a desire to put as much performance as possible into the hardware. This obviously makes the streaming option the better choice.

and be able to connect to any screen with a cord (like at a hotel)

This is probably the best vaguely-unique idea you've had, unfortunately it's possibly not as easy to realise as you'd like it to be. In a hotel, you're most likely to want to connect the device to the television, in which case there'd need to be a single input that can receive SCART, RCA, S-Video and DisplayPort. You'd also want it to connect to desktop monitors (i.e. "Screens") and that requires additional support for VGA and DVI.

The only sensible way to do this is with a wide array of cables, which you'd probably be asking the consumer to take with them when they go to a hotel to use the device. That's a nightmare situation, the cables would take more room than the handheld and its games.

This is also partially why when Nintendo designed the DS, and Sony the PSP, they didn't make the games compatible with their console offerings. They do allow the devices to interact, however, I believe at least one of them allows their device to register as an additional gaming controller, and some games provide additional HUD details on the console. They do not allow them to play identical games, though, because it would be unplayable to a large population, resulting in huge amounts of negative feedback.

In summary, this would be more of a pipe-dream than an actual product. Stick it on a proprietary operating system designed for rendering complex graphics, rather than a general purpose operating system designed for a range of devices. The cross-playability (For want of a better term) should be limited to when the device detects the possibility of a 5mbit stream from the original console (Likely restricting this to LAN), and have a wide array of portable games for those who can't make use of such a feature.




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#8 8 years ago

astafford64;5424830What if Alienware was considering producing a gaming console that included a portable gaming device?

The portable gaming device would allow users to continue playing the exact same game (including online games) they were playing on the console when the users have to leave the console. The portable gaming device would also have the ability to run other programs, connect to the internet, and be able to connect to any screen with a cord (like at a hotel).

This product would run on a Google Operating System.

Thoughts? I would love feedback and opinions on this idea!

(I am college student and this is my class project)

The PS3 used to do that before they took the OtherOS option out (except the ability for a person to keep a game running when another user wants to play a game, but with save files and such, that seems unnecessary). The only difference is that it didn't run a Google OS. Only Linux OSs were developed.

Also, you can hook any console to any screen. My brothers and I used to take consoles along on vacations and hook them to hotel TVs. I figure that you can still do it if you have the proper cables.




Showd0wN

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#9 8 years ago
Have you actually used any of their new models since they merged with Dell a couple years ago? I gotta say, they've really cleaned their act up. Sure, it's expensive as all hell, but you really get what you pay for.

Yes I have used many of their models, and also performed quite a few repairs on them too.

I agree the general quality has increased since they merged with Dell but I still think some of the option choices they provide are dubious at best and they seem to not considering cooling as a possible factor (I think the m9750 was the best example this**).

**: yes this is pre-dell.




Caprica-Six

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#10 8 years ago

Since Alienware is owned by dell now i do not see that happening at all




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