Am I missing something? 9 replies

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Andron Taps Forum Mod

Faktrl is Best Pony

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#1 4 years ago

So I'm looking for a job, any job, and I'm looking all around for non-student jobs on campus. What do I find?

Administrative assistant- 20hrs a week - decent pay. Not bad. But wait!

First: you have to have a high school diploma, but that's not enough! You also have to have either 5 years of secretarial experience or a bachelor's degree...

...WHAT?

I swear to christ, in the next five years you'll need a master's degree in chemical engineering just to run the fryers at a McDonalds.

>_>


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Schofield VIP Member

om :A

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#2 4 years ago

UPS is hiring couriers in my town.

Requirements: Valid driver license Completion of high school not necessary ----8 to 12 months experience----

Where does one get experience driving your vehicles, if one needs to have driven your vehicles to obtain experience?

It seems to be commonplace nowadays; too much population, not enough work. So what do you do? Up the requirements.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#3 4 years ago

Well shit man, how else are community colleges and driving schools supposed to stay in business? =p


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#4 4 years ago
Am I missing something?

Companies tend to be highly risk averse. There are plenty of people out there who have left college and are desperate for a job, any job. And there are plenty of people who've been doing admin stuff for five years or more. There's also the fact that the adverts tend to be written by people who don't actually do the jobs.

Especially given that 'admin' is,

A) Poorly defined

and

B) Generally a shrinking area of employment

It's not particularly surprising that they'd require either high qualifications for significant employment experience.

I suppose another way to look at it is that if certificates of education have low value, you need a lot of it to purchase a job. If you could trust the lower schools to have done their job, perhaps you'd only need an HS diploma or experience. But would any of us really accept that someone with an HS diploma wasn't a total retard/unreliable?

What do you think the result of low powered evidence, information loss on actual requirements, and a dying role is going to be? ;)

Lots of things are like that really.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#5 4 years ago

It's not just admin. Pretty much any job that involves selling stuff or standing at a cashier.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Schofield VIP Member

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#6 4 years ago

That's one issue... a lot of menial jobs which give young people a way into the work force are being done by computers now. Our local Wal-mart only has two cashiers left, the other 18 'cashiers' are all automated. That's what, like 20-25 positions no longer necessary, and when you add that up for the various other retailers out there, well you've got a problem.

It seems like the only route you really can go now is university/college, and if you think those are over-saturated now, just imagine how it'll be in another decade. The years 2010 - 2025 are supposedly going to have more people graduating from universities and colleges then throughout the entire course of history. That's a lot of people.

We're screwed. =p




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#7 4 years ago

Reminds me of this:

Start @14:00 for the part I have in mind.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#8 4 years ago

Schofield;5734376That's one issue... a lot of menial jobs which give young people a way into the work force are being done by computers now. Our local Wal-mart only has two cashiers left, the other 18 'cashiers' are all automated. That's what, like 20-25 positions no longer necessary, and when you add that up for the various other retailers out there, well you've got a problem.

It seems like the only route you really can go now is university/college, and if you think those are over-saturated now, just imagine how it'll be in another decade. The years 2010 - 2025 are supposedly going to have more people graduating from universities and colleges then throughout the entire course of history. That's a lot of people.

We're screwed. =p

Are we? As efficiency goes up, generally, the cost of entering the market goes down. Fewer people employed, but more competitive industries. Less money but cheaper goods.

I could easily see a situation where work is relatively rare and done primarily 'employing' yourself, but where people are okay with that. We might not all be Amish, but certainly one way we might go is an Amish-styled culture with respect to work where more efficient tools mean that we don't have to toil in the fields all day.

Maybe. I'm not saying it's going to work out one thing or the other. Just that there's hope. Large companies are generally horribly inefficient - especially in a changing marketplace.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#9 4 years ago

Another way to look at it would be that getting rid of jobs that require unskilled manual labour leaves more people for employment in other fields like services or manufacturing. Such jobs add more value to your economy and a bigger economy usually pays off for all people who take part. And getting the necessary education seems to be getting easier and cheaper all the time.




D3matt

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#10 4 years ago
Nemmerle;5734397Are we? As efficiency goes up, generally, the cost of entering the market goes down. Fewer people employed, but more competitive industries. Less money but cheaper goods.

Software and automation is expensive. I've been looking at a software solution to the manual scanning and sorting of mail and faxes at our company. The cost to do as many pages as ~4 people do right now? Well over $200,000 not including support.