Another University Thread!!!!!!!!!! 5 replies

Please wait...

Andron Taps Forum Mod

Faktrl is Best Pony

261,593 XP

10th September 2007

4 Uploads

21,746 Posts

1,754 Threads

#1 7 years ago

Ok, guys, so I'm going to be attending University next year, and I'm probably going to be majoring in Physics.

This is another Degree-type question.

The college I'd like to attend offers the standard B.S. in Physics, but they also have the Dual-Degree option where you spend 3-years earning your Physics degree from them, and then you have the option of attend the second 3-years earning a B.S. in Engineering from either the Georgia Institute of Technology, Mercer University, or Clemson University (Killer Kyle please feel free to chime in :D).

Now, while it sounds really tempting, I've read and heard that Dual-Degrees are even harder to complete than multiple-major degrees, and they do take longer. I would, however, like to take Computer Science and Electrical Engineering courses so I can get a well-rounded education for the scientific-engineering field.

My main interest as a career is the Medical Scientist Program (MD/Ph.D), or the Attending Physician route, which means I'm going to be taking pre-med.

So, I'm just wondering, what is you guys'/moregun's opinion on Dual-Degrees vs a double-major or single-major with extra courses?


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Guest

I didn't make it!

0 XP

 
#2 7 years ago

Just out of curiosity, why would you get two under-grad degrees, and then go on the a doctoral? I know that it is becoming more and more common for med students to have master's degrees, but why the double under-grad? Why not go for the master's, seeing as how you would be spending about the same amount of time working on the two degrees.

My post may be stupid, since I am younger and am not thinking of college specifics yet.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

Snipes With Artillery

277,420 XP

22nd March 2005

0 Uploads

27,192 Posts

0 Threads

#3 7 years ago

computernerd;5582499Ok, guys, so I'm going to be attending University next year, and I'm probably going to be majoring in Physics.

This is another Degree-type question.

The college I'd like to attend offers the standard B.S. in Physics, but they also have the Dual-Degree option where you spend 3-years earning your Physics degree from them, and then you have the option of attend the second 3-years earning a B.S. in Engineering from either the Georgia Institute of Technology, Mercer University, or Clemson University (Killer Kyle please feel free to chime in :D).

Now, while it sounds really tempting, I've read and heard that Dual-Degrees are even harder to complete than multiple-major degrees, and they do take longer. I would, however, like to take Computer Science and Electrical Engineering courses so I can get a well-rounded education for the scientific-engineering field.

My main interest as a career is the Medical Scientist Program (MD/Ph.D), or the Attending Physician route, which means I'm going to be taking pre-med.

So, I'm just wondering, what is you guys'/moregun's opinion on Dual-Degrees vs a double-major or single-major with extra courses?

How are you funding the degree? Will you be taking summer courses at a local community college, to take care of gen-ed stuff for cheaper (I would STRONGLY advise you do this)?

Physics and Engineering aren't the most common backgrounds for doctors to have, but it could end up being a very good combination. If you can afford it (are there ROTC scholarships for graduate school?) go for it.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

298,365 XP

26th May 2003

0 Uploads

28,147 Posts

5 Threads

#4 7 years ago

Why are you make the decision to pursue a second undergrad now? If you do well in the physics degree can't you can apply to take an engineering degree later? And if you don't do well in the physics degree....




Huffardo

Arrrr!

48,770 XP

29th November 2003

0 Uploads

4,632 Posts

0 Threads

#5 7 years ago

My first thought: How will you pay for all this?

Anyway, think about getting another bachelor's once you have your first degree under control and failed to get into the medical programs you are actually interested in, it's easy enough to think you'll just stack a dozen degrees, but it's hard, unpaid work.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

Faktrl is Best Pony

261,593 XP

10th September 2007

4 Uploads

21,746 Posts

1,754 Threads

#6 7 years ago

Stratopwn3r;5582580Just out of curiosity, why would you get two under-grad degrees, and then go on the a doctoral? I know that it is becoming more and more common for med students to have master's degrees, but why the double under-grad? Why not go for the master's, seeing as how you would be spending about the same amount of time working on the two degrees.

My post may be stupid, since I am younger and am not thinking of college specifics yet.[/QUOTE]

Mostly for the extra-resume boost.

Crazy Wolf;5582586How are you funding the degree? Will you be taking summer courses at a local community college, to take care of gen-ed stuff for cheaper (I would STRONGLY advise you do this)?[/quote]

Maybe, the HOPE scholarship is something in my state that effectively cuts the yearly rate in half, as long as you maintain at least a B average. Other than that, I'd just look for scholarships and constantly be working hard at it.

Physics and Engineering aren't the most common backgrounds for doctors to have, but it could end up being a very good combination. If you can afford it (are there ROTC scholarships for graduate school?) go for it.

Keep in mind that this isn't a decision I plan on making right now, it's just a thought based on my interests. And no, but the Medical Scientist Program is fully-funded by the government and they pay you a monthly stipend of about $2,500.

As for the Attending Physician route, the Air Force, Army, and Navy all have what's known as the Health Professions Scholarship Program which is like ROTC in that they pay for Med-School and they give you a monthly stipend about the same amount as the MSP.

[QUOTE=Nemmerle;5582598]Why are you make the decision to pursue a second undergrad now? If you do well in the physics degree can't you can apply to take an engineering degree later? And if you don't do well in the physics degree....

Yeah, as I said I don't plan on making the decision right now, but I did want to get some opinions on the subject just so I have a general idea of what I might expect if I should, at some point, decide to go that route.

[QUOTE=Huffardo;5582607]Anyway, think about getting another bachelor's once you have your first degree under control and failed to get into the medical programs you are actually interested in, it's easy enough to think you'll just stack a dozen degrees, but it's hard, unpaid work.

Naturally, I chose physics mainly because that's what I'm interested in, and from what I've read and heard most physics degree holders usually go into engineering or they go to graduate school in order to get a better resume.

You're right, it would probably be the wiser option to start with one degree and see where it goes rather than to attempt to stack them, but advice is what this thread is all about =p

The college I'd like to go to w/ HOPE will make for a certainly manageable way to pay off student loans over time and support myself after graduation.


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.