Basic College Mid-Term. Computer Support 14 replies

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Kilobyte

What does the Fox say?

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23rd November 2002

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#1 8 years ago

Okay, so I am back in college, trying to get my certifications. A painfully boring affair mind you.

The question asks whether or not this generation is more optimistic, or pessimistic about the impact computers in our lives. (More so than the previous generation(s)) Why?

So I ask you, are you optimistic, or pessimistic?




kow_ciller

Gettin' hardware chilly

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16th June 2004

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#2 8 years ago

Everyone is all "ohai, lemme check facebook"

That pretty much sums up all of our generation. I more or less feel the same way about computers.




Junk angel

Huh, sound?

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29th January 2007

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#3 8 years ago

I'd say the current generation is neither optimistic nor pessimistic at this moment. They consider computers to be an integral part of their lives and most can't fathom living with them.

So asking that question in itself seems a bit more like a fallacy as the current generation doesn't consider an impact. It already lives in a post-falloff state in some ways. The impact can still change of course, but I doubt people can take computers more matter-of-factly anymore.




eezstreet

Lord of the .DCC files

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16th June 2008

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#4 8 years ago

The common society discovered what we gamers and generally more intelligent folk have known all the while for a decade: The Internet.

In a way, it's like the Twitter and Facebook addicts are like the Spaniards 'discovering' the New World.




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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8th October 2006

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#5 8 years ago

It's weird how people understand so little about computers yet they use them so much. I can't think of anything else we use so ubiquitously yet so many people are so oblivious to how it works.

In a way, it's like the Twitter and Facebook addicts are like the Spaniards 'discovering' the New World.

So...they give us all weird diseases in blankets and take our land?




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#6 8 years ago

Assuming that we continue to get more advanced, I'm optimistic about the future impact of computers on society. Networked, they allow us access to a ridiculous amount of information. They're good at most of the things we're bad at. They never get bored; rarely forget things unless told to do so; can perform linear calculations far more efficiently than ourselves. And if people diminish face-to-face contact in favour of them – I think that says as much about the unrewarding nature of their face-to-face relationships as the addictive power of the medium.

Computers provide essentially a super-fluidity of information. The biggest implication of this is, I think, for the future of education: Retaining discrete facts is becoming less and less valuable. What's more important these days is fluid verbal and non-verbal thinking ability – coming to useful conclusions based on new data quickly. Which isn't something that the current trivia-pattern memorisation-recitation cycle trains people to do.

Ironically information itself is more valuable than ever. The speed with which information can be moved around as compared to the speed it can be processed and organised has allowed hierarchical power structures; governments, companies; to utterly dominate the interests of the general public. I believe that improved network participation is gradually correcting the balance in that regard and will eventually dictate changes in the political superstructure of society.

Politics started off when societies had to adapt to rapidly changing environments without having time to reach a consensus. The more able individuals are to understand an issue and communicate with their peers the less necessary a single persistent hierarchy becomes. Ad-hoc groups that arise from the shared interests of their members social networks and dissolve afterwards will I think – provided that the trend to higher information fluidity continues – be the shape of things to come. Though probably not for some time.

When I get up in the morning the first thing I do is check my emails and the forums, it's the last thing I do before I go to bed. I've learned more from the internet than I have from any school, developed better styles of argument from talking to people on it than anywhere else. Most of my non-physical entertainment comes through the computer in some form or another.

Frankly if they had a decent human-integrated computer I'd be signing up to have it installed right now. I think they're great. And while the future may contain many Bad Things I don't consider better computers to be among them.

Unless people do something really stupid like make computers with emotional issues, or create control microchips for people and turn us all into slaves or something. You know; always those fun possibilities.

Guess what I'm trying to say is, like most things, it depends who's takes the initiative.




Huffardo

Arrrr!

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29th November 2003

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#7 8 years ago

The answer is an obvious yes, you probably couldn't have made the question any more unclear. =p

As for what you probably meant, people are used to using computers themselves now. 40 years back most people had not even seen a computer with their own eyes, so of course they would be more skeptical towards those weird machines that steal their jobs.

Mr. Pedantic;5411405It's weird how people understand so little about computers yet they use them so much. I can't think of anything else we use so ubiquitously yet so many people are so oblivious to how it works.[/QUOTE] They are quite complicated compared to e.g. a fork. If you think it's pretty simple, just look at the transistor-level architecture of a modern chip, let's say a CPU, and imagine explaining how a piece of your high-level programming language causes them to act to a random facebook-user.

[QUOTE=Nemmerle;5411409] Frankly if they had a decent human-integrated computer I'd be signing up to have it installed right now. I think they're great.

I'm not sure I'd want to be amongst the first to have any chip sewn into me even if communication was strictly one way from me to it, there is too much that could go wrong, unintentionally or not.




Mr. Pedantic

I would die without GF

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#8 8 years ago
They are quite complicated compared to e.g. a fork. If you think it's pretty simple, just look at the transistor-level architecture of a modern chip, let's say a CPU, and imagine explaining how a piece of your high-level programming language causes them to act to a random facebook-user.

I'm not even talking about EE-level stuff. I'm talking about Windows usage. Half the people I fix stuff for don't know the difference between a browser and an operating system. So they all know that Firefox is better than Internet Explorer, even though they don't know what they even are. I don't expect people to know the minutiae of how transistors make up the architecture of a chip, but it would be nice once in a while to have someone who knew what they were talking about. Thankfully, I have a few friends like that.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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#9 8 years ago
Huffardo;5411631I'm not sure I'd want to be amongst the first to have any chip sewn into me even if communication was strictly one way from me to it, there is too much that could go wrong, unintentionally or not.

And that's why I wouldn't want to be in the initial studies for the thing. I imagine you'd install the interface architecture directly into the person and have most of the chips modular for replacement in the case of upgrades/faults though.




Huffardo

Arrrr!

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#10 8 years ago
Mr. Pedantic;5411637I'm not even talking about EE-level stuff. I'm talking about Windows usage. Half the people I fix stuff for don't know the difference between a browser and an operating system. So they all know that Firefox is better than Internet Explorer, even though they don't know what they even are. I don't expect people to know the minutiae of how transistors make up the architecture of a chip, but it would be nice once in a while to have someone who knew what they were talking about. Thankfully, I have a few friends like that.

Oh, sorry, sometimes I forget there are people like that out there. It gives others an enjoyable living though, so I think we should just be happy when people rather pay someone than invest a lot of their time learning stuff they find boring. :)

What is EE short of by the way? Electrical Engineering?




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