Can anyone identify this bullet, or what fires it? 57 replies

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colonel_bob

Here & There

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4th June 2004

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#51 14 years ago

What the heck are you doing with that shell, Mac?




Revenge VIP Member

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28th July 2004

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#52 14 years ago

Wait one minute..... Teenage Americans - some as young as 15 - are experts in ammunition and weapons already? Is it all written on the building blocks you get to play with in pre-school? No wonder gun crime is so high in the US.




colonel_bob

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#53 14 years ago

I think it would be the gang members and such that cause a high crime rate, seeing as we know how to use firearms responsibly.




Ensign Riles VIP Member

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17th June 2003

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#54 14 years ago

Mac Daddy, if that is a live round I strongly suggest that you keep it cool. It probably isn't the best idea for me to keep some of my unfired rounds on my desk, but if a .30 ever went off, well, yeah....




Spyder F-16

Amerika ist Wunderbar

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2nd February 2003

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#55 14 years ago
Red MenaceActually I beat you, you just editied your last post but it doesn't matter we both agree it is the .58 caliber.[/QUOTE] Third Agreement here. The .58 Caliber was the most popular amongst the Pennsylvanian units during the Civil War. Those .58 Rounds can be found anywhere a battle took place near Pennsylvania... Especially Gettysburg.
Mast3rofPuppetsThe police doesn't use .50 caliber sniper rifles, they are mainly used as anti-material rifles. Do you know how friggin' huge those rifles are? If someone would fire one in a park near me I would feel afraid... Hell, in Sweden they arn't even used to take out individual soldiers, the coastal and arctic rangers use them to take out light armor, mortars, mines and trucks.[/QUOTE] The reason why the .50 caliber rounds are not used on soldiers is due to them being barred from direct use on a soldier by the Geneva Conventions. Shooting at the guys helmet with the thing is fair, but at the soldier without armor... no. Usually if you're hit anywhere with a .50 round, you're as good as dead. Police do use the .50 caliber, but not often. Most snipers that work for SWAT tend to perfer the .308Win (7.62mm).
RevenWait one minute..... Teenage Americans - some as young as 15 - are experts in ammunition and weapons already? Is it all written on the building blocks you get to play with in pre-school? No wonder gun crime is so high in the US.
Fact of the matter is that young are facinated by firearms. Plus, many families in the United States do have members who are hunters, or soldiers. I myself am from an Air Force family, and I grew up hunting. Does that make me a cold blooded killer? No. To generalize that expertice and interest in firearms at all makes someone a killer or a criminal is both 99% falsified as well as plain nieve ignorance. The amount of guns used in crime is only a extremely small number of the total amount of guns in the United States. [QUOTE=colonel_bob]I think it would be the gang members and such that cause a high crime rate, seeing as we know how to use firearms responsibly.
Righty-o. It's the criminals that are responsible for crime. When guns are outlawed, only the outlaws have guns. I still cannot fathom why it is that politicians want to take the arms away from law abiding citizens, which never work; instead of cracking down on criminals. [QUOTE=Ensign Riles]Mac Daddy, if that is a live round I strongly suggest that you keep it cool. It probably isn't the best idea for me to keep some of my unfired rounds on my desk, but if a .30 ever went off, well, yeah....

Knowing from seeing some of my hairbrained friends try stuff like this, i can tell you that you're off the mark. A live round either takes a hard smack to the primer, or more heat than most normal room conditions can produce to fire. If the primer does get stricken with enough force to cause it to go, the bullet will not fly. To have the bullet fly, you need to have much pressure to propell the bullet. If the bullet is not in the breech of a weapon, the bullet will just flop out of the casing while the gas from inside the case goes into the air. The gas needs to be contained behind the bullet in a barrel to be propelled with an airtight seal on the sides so the gas doesnt go around it; otherwise it does nothing. Also, most rounds that people keep on desks are dummy rounds. I myself keep a .50 Caliber dummy round on my desk.




Ensign Riles VIP Member

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#56 14 years ago

Well, I lit a few .22s and they went of, so better safe than sorry. :p

The rounds on my desk are ones that I found that were dropped at the firing range and which I do not have a firearm for.




Spyder F-16

Amerika ist Wunderbar

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#57 14 years ago

When I said under most room conditions, I meant when not lit by a lighter or other flame.

Although I say it shouldn't happen, common sence should be in play at all times. Treat any projectile or weapon as if it was a 50 Megaton nuke.




Ensign Riles VIP Member

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#58 14 years ago

Well, with me I am the type who doesn't know what it would do unless I see it under my own eyes.

Haven't died yet and it has only made me more intelligent so it all works out in the end..