Circular saw safety 9 replies

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Nemmerle Forum Mod

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26th May 2003

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#1 7 years ago

So. I'm making a gate out of a pallet for some guy and I've got a magical circular saw. New things to play with, haven't used one before.

Now done a bit of reading around the internet and used it to cut a few slats and it seems fairly straightforward. However, it strikes me that cutting all of these slats individually is going to be a bit of a pain. So what I was planning on doing was getting a couple of workbenches, mostly assembling the gate - apart from the bit at the base obviously - clamping it to the workbenches and running the saw across the end to get all the slats right length.

As far as I'm aware kickback is mostly a result of thin wood bending and grabbing the saw through a lack of proper support - or some moron trying to force the thing back on line or cut a curve with it. Which shouldn't really be a problem here. I mean I'll be off to one side, the slats are fairly rigid and hardly anything's going to be out past the benches anyway. But I thought I'd just check to see whether anyone saw (hur-hur) any obvious problems.




Mihail VIP Member

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#2 7 years ago

Not exactly sure of the question.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#3 7 years ago

Do you foresee see any problems with the proposed course of action?




Raptor_101

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#4 7 years ago

Are you saying you are going to put the slats together on the workbenches and cut them all at the end of the tables to the right size? If so you'd need to take it slow. I usually cut a peice of wood which I use as a template and mark the other pieces, then cut them individually along the marks even if it takes some time.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#5 7 years ago

I'm planning to screw the slats to the supporting parts of the gate first and clamp the gate as a whole to the tables, so that they shouldn't shift around or anything. But yeah, essentially. Hope to be able to cut them pretty much as one bit.

Though obviously if anyone can foresee potential problems I'll just do it the normal way and save myself the risk.

Nice and slow. Gotcha. :)




Goody. VIP Member

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#6 7 years ago

I have used these saws on countless occasions as part of my working life. From what you discribe your going to clamp a load of lats together then cut them all in one go. NP with that except that king od saw wont cut that many down the face of the lat. YOu will have to go down the edges and the same on the other side. One draw back doing it that way is the cuts will have to be spot on or you could end up with a ridge. As raptor said the best way is to cut one and use only that one as your template and mark the rest from that. Have them all marked before you start cutting then do them 1 at a time. The saw is evil and must be treated as such. Dont play with it, Dont have any more blade out than you have to and always no matter what keep your hands behind it.

Edit - I see what you mean now, Screwing the lats inplace and marking them will be fine so long as there are secure. You could do it on the floor to be honest so long as there is clearence and you set the blade properly.




emonkies

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#7 7 years ago

Most circular saws it will buck if it binds so if you dont have a good grip it could get away. About only thing I would worry about is a nail or a particularly nasty knothole.

I have done what you are describing, just use a chalk line or a carpenters square and a ruler to get straight line and saw should have a notch in guide to set on line to keep it straight.

Just keep hands and feet out of saw and wear gooogles.




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#8 7 years ago

Nemmerle;5523842I'm planning to screw the slats to the supporting parts of the gate first and clamp the gate as a whole to the tables, so that they shouldn't shift around or anything. But yeah, essentially. Hope to be able to cut them pretty much as one bit.

Though obviously if anyone can foresee potential problems I'll just do it the normal way and save myself the risk.

Nice and slow. Gotcha. :)

I'd say the only potential problem with that is that the saw gets stuck and the slat it got stuck in starts to rotate. But if you fasten the object properly this shouldn't be a problem. I'd be more concerned with loose clothes or hair getting too close to the machinery. You can prevent most potential injuries with proper working clothes including safety glasses.




BobDole

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#9 7 years ago

In most cases slower is better, though I'm not a construction guy so I wouldn't know... Good luck on your project, Hope all works out.




Guest

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#10 7 years ago

Slow is better, but I it "should" be okay to do what you're proposing, though I wouldn't.

*disclaimer: not responsible if you cut your own head off*