Crashed WW2 was kept in secret - Skåne, Southern Sweden 8 replies

Please wait...

Silberio VIP Member

Bourée

392,819 XP

9th October 2007

0 Uploads

37,218 Posts

4 Threads

#1 6 years ago

Crashed bomber from the second world war was kept in secret

Spoiler: Show

Military historicians know well about the British bomber that crashed outside the south coast of Skåne and its crew - But first now, it has been revealed where the Halifax bomber is lying.

The four-engine plane and its seven crewmen should've been part of a bombing raid agains Hamburg the 3rd August of 1943 when it got caught in a vicious storm.

The historician Widfeldt in Nässjö tells that a thunder struck the plane and cut off two of the engines, the radio, velocity indicator and its gyrocompass. The crew salvoed the bombload and the plane turned north, towards the Swedish coast.

After about an hour, the pilot headed the plane towards the lighthouse in Falsterbonäset. The plane kept course towards Ringsjön in middle of Skåne, then turned south again. At this point, the pilot ordered the crew to jump.

The first crewmember landed in Flyinge. The pilot jumped last and landed, in the dark, right on a cow in Esarp (Southeast of Staffanstorp), says Widfeldt.

The plane was found randomly by knowledge-expedition[SIZE="3"][COLOR="Red"]*[/COLOR][/SIZE] 'Havsresan' (Sea travel) from the university of Lund last summer, at a depth of 15 meters, a mile south of Kämpinge. But the discovery was kept secret untill now, partly to avoid wreck plunderers and partly due to the ammunition which is probably still there is difficult to handle, according to the newspaper City Malmö

[SIZE="3"][COLOR="Red"]*[/COLOR][/SIZE]: I was really unsure about this word... It's translated literally.

Anyhow, here's a roughly translated article from a Swedish internet-news paper. I know some might find this pretty interesting =p

I just hope the Brit government won't call back the ol' lady... I'd love to have the plane at some museum here in Sweden. The historical value is freakin enormous considering the situation.

Regards :don:


qjyUJrq.png



Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

735,271 XP

9th December 2003

0 Uploads

71,460 Posts

0 Threads

#2 6 years ago

Nice, too bad there aren't any pictures available to show us what sort of condition it seems to be in. :)




Silberio VIP Member

Bourée

392,819 XP

9th October 2007

0 Uploads

37,218 Posts

4 Threads

#3 6 years ago

Hehe - very true!

Also, as I was writing this, I made a quick search and found this. It's all in Swedish... But they show a the wreck at least =p


qjyUJrq.png



Snow_Flake

GF is my bext friend *hugs GF*

50 XP

21st December 2006

0 Uploads

886 Posts

0 Threads

#4 6 years ago
Einherjar Silberio;5604445 The pilot jumped last and landed, in the dark, right on a cow in Esarp

Ha! :lulz:

Anyway, I'd like to see some pictures of it one day, I'm sure someone will get down there and take some without setting of any active bombs.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

Snipes With Artillery

277,420 XP

22nd March 2005

0 Uploads

27,192 Posts

0 Threads

#5 6 years ago

"Research expedition" or "scientific expedition" or "forensic expedition", perhaps?

Also, that's the luckiest pilot ever. A Swedish cow's pretty much the best thing a crashing British Pilot could expect to find under him, considering the ground that he'd been flying over shortly before.




Red Menace

SCHOFIELD DID 4/30

415,758 XP

10th August 2004

0 Uploads

40,364 Posts

1 Threads

#6 6 years ago
Einherjar Silberio;5604445I just hope the Brit government won't call back the ol' lady... I'd love to have the plane at some museum here in Sweden. The historical value is freakin enormous considering the situation.

Sounds like they ditched it, doubt there is a whole lot left to display. Cool story, nonetheless.


sigpic82523_3.gif</div></body></html>



Silberio VIP Member

Bourée

392,819 XP

9th October 2007

0 Uploads

37,218 Posts

4 Threads

#7 6 years ago

Most likely... After being over 60 years down there, it's probably in worst imaginable conditions... But I'd still like to see it someday, in person, that is ^^

And, thanks Crazy Wolf!

@Snow_Flake: Yes, I'm surprised there isn't much more research about this; besides, all that time there would leave the ammo pretty much unusable, no? Although, Swedish laws are very strict concerning this kinda stuff... No surprise it's been kept secretly.

EDIT: I finally watched the video I posted on my second reply (I just made it to see a bit before), and they mention the autorities are worried about the bombs. Now, in the article, the historician says the bombs were salvoed before the crew jumped, which makes me unsure... But if that's the case, then it's understandable. But didn't bombs back then have even an expiration date?


qjyUJrq.png



Crazy Wolf VIP Member

Snipes With Artillery

277,420 XP

22nd March 2005

0 Uploads

27,192 Posts

0 Threads

#8 6 years ago

Er, not a reliable one, no. The assumption was that they were going to be dropped on Nazis pretty ricky-tick, so I don't think they were too concerned about a civilian playing around with it a few decades later. Materials might decompose or degrade in quality over decades, but not at a reliable rate that you could say "oh, sure, no problem now!"

Depending on how damaged the cases are, some of the ammo or bombs might still be usable/active.

I think deep cold water actually is a fairly decent preservative, although the salt and the things living in the water could do some significant damage, and perhaps it's not deep enough...




Biiviz

Eggs!

50 XP

29th February 2004

0 Uploads

3,168 Posts

0 Threads

#9 6 years ago

The Baltic Sea is a brackish sea meaning it has lower salt contents than ocean water but higher than fresh water. The Baltic Sea has 6 to 8 ‰ (parts-per notation) while the average for saline oceans is 35‰ (parts-per notation).