Do I sound "qualified" enough for you? 25 replies

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#1 11 years ago

A PM I recently received from an anonymous user rose a question; "What makes you [me] think you can become a naval aviator right out of high school?" Since a few of you here have likely noticed that I'm 14 and am looking to join the Navy due to the topics I've created and responded to, I'd like to ask for feedback; does this sound like I'm qualified, determined, and otherwise knowledgeable enough to join the Navy?

1) "Why do you want to join the Navy? You're only 14; very few teenagers like you have the faintest idea what they're going to do after they graduate."

I want to serve my country, yada yada yada, but the main reason I want to be a Navy pilot is because a) my dad flew copilot in "Puff the Magic Dragon" during Vietnam, and b) my all-time favorite movie as a child (pre-10 years old) was not some cartoon; it was "Top Gun." I know that nothing is more exciting, challenging, or pure fun than flying a multi-million dollar piece of equipment off a boat at 180+ miles an hour, and it's one thing I've always wanted to do. Plus, I get to blow s*** up AND GET PAID FOR IT!!!!!!!! Upwards of 6K a month, once I get my commission after a few years. And, my being a genius results in my thinking ahead of my age group; I think about adult-level things, a.k.a., my future.

2) "What makes you think you can be a Navy pilot right out of high school?"

Well, for starters, I'm a genius; the military tends not to drop the smart people in the middle of a firefight, nor do they let total idiots have control of a state-of-the-art multi-million-dollar piece of machinery that's moving at 300+ MPH with hundreds of buttons, switches, levers, gauges, and various other expensive electrical components. Nerds like me get all the cool s*** to ourselves. Also, I don't plan on going to a local recruiter, signing a paper, and getting shot into the air the next day; I've got my dad's Bluejacket's Manual that I worship. I know what it takes to get to be a naval aviator, and it's not easy; boot camp, government-paid college (possibly West Point academy if my ABT scores are great), flight training, fly-around-the-world-to-your-ship/station, get onboard, then fly. As for ROTC, I'm planning on getting that when I get into my freshman year. That would be fall of '08, precisely.

3) "Still, what makes you think you can fly a fighter plane?"

They teach you that in flight school. BUT, I've got a head start. Here's my training-that's-not-training resume;

a) I flew an actual Cessna when I was 7, was on the news about it, and have footage by the journalist in the back seat recording of my being in actual control of the plane. Of course, the pilot was there with me, but he did not have control of the plane at the time; he handed the matter over to me, then landed the plane himself.

b) The USAF had a tour going throughout the country, and my parents took me to it when it was in a local city when I was 6. It was in the summer, and they had a decommissioned F-16 fighter on display along with a semi-trailer containing a series of simulators. We went inside, got our own ID cards, then went into the next room where a TV played a briefing of the simulated mission for us. After the briefing, my mom, dad, and I went into the last room, where 5 simulators sat. We all sat down in our own simulators, the officers in charge booted them up, I got airborne with the HOTAS controls, figured out how to drop bombs, and beat the simulator. The mission was this; take off from a land based runway in the F-16, fly over the mountains to the ocean, fly out to sea, dodge the AAA system guarding an oil rig, bomb the oil rig, then fly back to base and land. I got as far as bombing the oil rig, then crashed on landing, since I didn't figure out how to read the AOA gauge and lower flaps, etc. I did figure out how to lower the gear, though; I just didn't know how to land and survive.

As you would expect, the 20 minutes this simulator lasted gave the personnel at the site plenty of time to crowd around and watch. At first, when we walked into the simulator, two officers were supervising (I found out they were officers only because my dad, who was in the Navy, saw their uniforms. I was 6 and knew absolute jack about the military, except the fact that they blew people up, let alone their uniforms). They paced behind the seats, watching us, then noticed that a 6 year old boy was flying a F-16 better than his mother was. (From this point forward is purely what my dad told me, since I was too focused on what I was doing, and I have reason to believe it.) One officer stopped behind me, leaned on the seat of the simulator, watched for a second, then motioned for the second officer to join him. About 5 minutes after the second officer joined the first behind me (around the time I was all the way out to sea, en route to the oil rig), he left to the next room. He came back with another 3 people in tow, 2 women and another man, my dad noted, and by the time the thing ended, 6 more Air Force officers were crowded around my simulator. My mom had crashed her F-16 on takeoff, my dad had been shot down by the oil rig's defenses, and I was making my way through the AAA systems to drop some bombs. I dropped the bomb, blew up the oil rig, then flew back to the base and crashed on landing.

So, those of you who read that ungodly wall of text, I thank you for your time and would really appreciate some feedback. Do you people think I've got what it takes?




Captain Fist

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#2 11 years ago

I smell arrogance.

I'm not reading that, mostly because it doesn't hold my attention, an another, I don't care why or if you join the navy. I read the first few sentences out of curiosity.




Jeff Über Admin

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#3 11 years ago

There are 3 ways to become an Officer. Through a battlefield promotion, going to college and graduating then applying for it or going to Annapolis (in the case of the Navy) for Officer Training. Either way, you cannot become a pilot right out of high school. You need to go through at least 4 extra years of school before you become an officer and then onto Flight School. As your father was in the Navy I assume you knew that. They won't make exceptions in anyones case. If you don't have what it takes to be an Officer, you won't fly a plane in the Navy. It's that simple.


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#4 11 years ago
n0e;3838450There are 3 ways to become an Officer. Through a battlefield promotion, going to college and graduating then applying for it or going to Annapolis (in the case of the Navy) for Officer Training. Either way, you cannot become a pilot right out of high school. You need to go through at least 4 extra years of school before you become an officer and then onto Flight School. As your father was in the Navy I assume you knew that. They won't make exceptions in anyones case. If you don't have what it takes to be an Officer, you won't fly a plane in the Navy. It's that simple.

I am completely aware of that. The Navy pays tuition for qualified recruits, who, after receiving at least a bachelor's degree in a field related to the particular Navy job you apply for, send you to boot camp, then to a Navy school that specializes in the field of the Navy you applied for. That would be the A-schools. Then, you go to OT in Maryland (as n0e mentions here) to get your commission. Enlisted men in the aviation field are only crewmembers; they service the planes. Officers fly the planes.

Aviation: Officer: Careers & Jobs: Navy <-Aviation for Officers Aviation: Enlisted: Careers & Jobs: Navy <-Aviation for Enlistees

I know what I'm talking about.




Jeff Über Admin

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#5 11 years ago

Easy there... no need to be so arrogant about what you think you know. I'm well aware of the recruitment process and where they train and other little tidbits abot the military. What my point was is that while I'm sure no one doubts you can fly a plane, but the way you're stating your argument is that you're going to fly as soon as you graduate from high school. That's simply not the case. Since you are so headstrong on shoving facts in the faces of those you try to convince, you should know that you still need at least 4 years of school first. They do not recruit normal high school graduates, to be an officer you need to have graduated from college. You go through NROTC which is a 4 year college (Annapolis Naval Academy) before you're trained on fighter planes. E.X. (Naval Officer Requirements) So, while you're busy telling everyone how good you are, how about giving them the benefit of the doubt that you're not unique in this word and while you proclaim yourself to be a genius that doesn't mean everyone else is a retard.


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Comet_buster

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#6 11 years ago

my younger brother wants to be a pilot, and he's in the ATC (air training core) i would supose that that would help




Grimme

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#7 11 years ago

You know your plans may very well change. Who knows, you could become a hardcore pacifist before you leave high school, or less extreme, apply to a different branch of the military. I don't see why you're so keen on specifics right now.




Huffardo

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#8 11 years ago

This overwhelming attention to becoming a navy pilot sounds incredibly childish, but that would be alright since you are child, what worries me is the stupid arrogance shown. I hardly think the navy wants someone who apparently believes himself way better than his superiors (and shows it), so you will have to work on that problem in the upcoming years. Genius or not, nobody likes an arrogant bastard, and arrogant people that want "to blow s*** up" and become rich by killing people are some of the most disgusting things I can think of.




mentalmagic

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#9 11 years ago

I agree with Hufffardo here, you come across completely arrogant in your posts. And personality must count for something. Don't put all your eggs in one basket, as they say.




WindowsVistaGeek19

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#10 11 years ago

For such a genius, I would've thought you'd have figured out proper grammar. =p Anyway, as others have stated, that was really arrogant at parts. It's ok to have a good view of what you want to do in your future, but don't shove it in people's faces, as if you're better then everyone else. If your such a genius, then I have one thing to say to you. Knowledge is only useful if you know the right way to use and present it. That post was not the right way to present it. People get angry when you present your own knowledge to them in a way that says "I'm way better then you and know a lot more then you could ever possibly know." In the end, it's great that you have a good idea of what you'd like to do in your life, but don't present it in a way like that.