Excercise 57 replies

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Superfluous Curmudgeon VIP Member

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22nd December 2007

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#1 2 years ago

What do you do for exercise, if anything?

I'm trying to get my cardio back to a point where it can handle everyday life, so I've been running about every other day since the beginning of the month. Before that it was pretty sporadic - maybe once a week one week, 3 times the next, etc. Usually 25-30 mins, about 2.5 miles. I thought I was going decently fast, but now that I calculate it, I see that's a pretty embarrassing 10-12 minute mile. Mind you, it's usually in 90-95 degree weather, and I usually take about 10 minutes to really get moving. By the time I'm done I almost always am pretty out of breath and have fairly sharp stomach cramps. If it weren't for these, I'd try to run faster. Once I stop, I'm pretty much drenched in sweat within a couple minutes, and this is in 10-20% humidity.

Building endurance and going faster/further requires pushing past the comfort zone, but my big concern is the stomach cramps. Usually I wait 3-5 hours after eating to run, so if it is food related, I must digest food really slowly... If you happen to do a lot of cardio, what's the secret to success?




Lindale Forum Mod

Mister Angry Rules Guy

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#2 2 years ago

I play guitar. A lot.


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NeoRanger

The Curse of Snake

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#3 2 years ago

I don't do cardio, primarily because running bores the living hell out of me. I'm also a heavy smoker, so the 30 minutes you mentioned are a way beyond what I can achieve. Usually at 10 minutes I need to call in a helicopter extraction to a hospital. Having said that, I get overexcited when I do run; I somehow managed to hurt my knee running two months ago and the thing has yet to heal. In the rare occasions that I have managed to include actual running in my schedule, I start by spitting out my lungs after two minutes to running about 2.5 kilometres in about 10 minutes.

I usually do weights, push-ups, pull-ups and the like; upper-body strength stuff. When I do bother with cardio, it's usually within the realm of power-walking, or stairs climbing or just jumping rope and jumping jacks. I'm lazy and I get distracted by shiny things. I'm also a bad average, because of the smoking and my age; if I feel my heart's about to blow up, I stop. That generally means I can't push myself an extra five minutes like I can usually add one more set or five more repeats on a weekly basis with my upper-body-strength training.

Three hours after eating should be plenty to go for a running. By the five hour mark and assuming you don't eat too much you should actually be running out of energy and requiring replenishing again. If your meals are small, an hour or two should be the ideal waiting time.




Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#4 2 years ago

"Superfluous Curmudgeon "What do you do for exercise, if anything?

I'm trying to get my cardio back to a point where it can handle everyday life, so I've been running about every other day since the beginning of the month. Before that it was pretty sporadic - maybe once a week one week, 3 times the next, etc. Usually 25-30 mins, about 2.5 miles. I thought I was going decently fast, but now that I calculate it, I see that's a pretty embarrassing 10-12 minute mile. Mind you, it's usually in 90-95 degree weather, and I usually take about 10 minutes to really get moving. By the time I'm done I almost always am pretty out of breath and have fairly sharp stomach cramps. If it weren't for these, I'd try to run faster. Once I stop, I'm pretty much drenched in sweat within a couple minutes, and this is in 10-20% humidity.

Building endurance and going faster/further requires pushing past the comfort zone, but my big concern is the stomach cramps. Usually I wait 3-5 hours after eating to run, so if it is food related, I must digest food really slowly... If you happen to do a lot of cardio, what's the secret to success?

There are two ways that work for me.

The first, whenever I've let things slide, is to use interval training when getting back into things. Sprint as fast as you possibly can for one minute, jog leisurely for one minute, sprint again for one minute... continue for as long as your legs will carry you. Do this for a few weeks, and your stamina will skyrocket.

The second is strength training in your legs. Aside from the fact that anybody who only does strength training in their upper body looks utterly absurd (and the fact that, as your largest muscles, strengthening your legs is imperative for any kind of success elsewhere), strengthening your legs will allow you to run faster and further. Weighted squats - six sets of ten, the highest weight you can safely manage in each, should do it for now. Don't do it on a running day though, strength training and cardio training should be kept firmly separate.

Also make sure you've eaten something with carbs in an hour before, and eat something with protein in within half an hour of finishing.




random_soldier1337

I live on Gaming Forums

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#5 2 years ago
"Mr. Matt"The first, whenever I've let things slide, is to use interval training when getting back into things. Sprint as fast as you possibly can for one minute, jog leisurely for one minute, sprint again for one minute... continue for as long as your legs will carry you. Do this for a few weeks, and your stamina will skyrocket.

What the hell are you!? Aren't you supposed to be like 60 or something? How have you gone soft if you can repeat that kind of interval training 2-3 times in a row?

I know what that box is hiding. A metal endoskeleton! You're a terminator is what you are. Everybody Skynet is coming!




belthagor

Property of FileTrekker

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#6 2 years ago

I used to go hiking up the goat path in the mountains, which was marvelous fun... and may do it again. xD

Currently though running is fun for me, along with leisurely walking somewhere.

I've always wanted to do parkour, though I don't think I'm built for it....




Silberio VIP Member

Bourée

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#7 2 years ago

I used to run around a hill that's by my house, the circumference is about 3.9 km which i used to run twice on a day, one soft jogging tour to warm up, and then the actual run with intervals (I usually ran half the distance the second time though, and occasionally I climbed the hill which is really steep).

Because I never had the discipline to do that regularly, I eventually decided to go on marches instead. I've done three so far, first time it was about 4 kilometers with 15 kilo backpack, second time was about 6 kilometer and the third 8.


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Superfluous Curmudgeon VIP Member

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22nd December 2007

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#8 2 years ago

"Mr. Matt"

There are two ways that work for me.

The first, whenever I've let things slide, is to use interval training when getting back into things. Sprint as fast as you possibly can for one minute, jog leisurely for one minute, sprint again for one minute... continue for as long as your legs will carry you. Do this for a few weeks, and your stamina will skyrocket.

The second is strength training in your legs. Aside from the fact that anybody who only does strength training in their upper body looks utterly absurd (and the fact that, as your largest muscles, strengthening your legs is imperative for any kind of success elsewhere), strengthening your legs will allow you to run faster and further. Weighted squats - six sets of ten, the highest weight you can safely manage in each, should do it for now. Don't do it on a running day though, strength training and cardio training should be kept firmly separate.

Also make sure you've eaten something with carbs in an hour before, and eat something with protein in within half an hour of finishing.

How long is your average workout? When I do cardio and when I used to do weights, my appetite's been killed until at least an hour after the workout. Do you recommend forcing food down within 30 minutes anyways, granted I can keep it down?




Mikey Über Admin

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#9 2 years ago

I walk 12000 steps a day in my daily life.

That's enough for me.


Mikey - GameFront.com - Lead Developer



Mr. Matt VIP Member

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#10 2 years ago
"Superfluous Curmudgeon "

"Mr. Matt"

There are two ways that work for me.

The first, whenever I've let things slide, is to use interval training when getting back into things. Sprint as fast as you possibly can for one minute, jog leisurely for one minute, sprint again for one minute... continue for as long as your legs will carry you. Do this for a few weeks, and your stamina will skyrocket.

The second is strength training in your legs. Aside from the fact that anybody who only does strength training in their upper body looks utterly absurd (and the fact that, as your largest muscles, strengthening your legs is imperative for any kind of success elsewhere), strengthening your legs will allow you to run faster and further. Weighted squats - six sets of ten, the highest weight you can safely manage in each, should do it for now. Don't do it on a running day though, strength training and cardio training should be kept firmly separate.

Also make sure you've eaten something with carbs in an hour before, and eat something with protein in within half an hour of finishing.

How long is your average workout? When I do cardio and when I used to do weights, my appetite's been killed until at least an hour after the workout. Do you recommend forcing food down within 30 minutes anyways, granted I can keep it down?

For cardio, I either go for an hour/half-hour jog/run respectively, or try for a five minute mile, depending on how I'm feeling at the time. It helps if you have a target to shoot for - if you're just running for the sake of it, you'll quickly find yourself giving up before you're truly fatigued.

For strength training, I go for an hour every other day - top half one session, bottom half next session. If you're spending any longer than an hour in the gym, you're chatting too much and not working enough.

As for the food thing, if you can't manage to eat anything after your workout then there are always protein shakes. Get something with 20 - 30g per serving and down that. The issue is that your body needs the protein to rebuild its muscles, and it starts burning through it almost immediately, so your body is most receptive to protein within about half an hour of working out.