Expatriation? 10 replies

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Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#1 7 years ago

It started as a playful thought, but the more I think of it the more seriously I'm considering moving to Europe, Canada, France, or even Australia in the next decade or two.

My main reasons are fairly simple: the economy is in the toilet (and yes, I know about Greece's influence on the rest of Europe's economy), the country is run by half-wits who are put in office by equally half-witted people, and it doesn't look like there's going to be any improvement in the near future, at least probably not in my lifetime.

But maybe I'm wrong, certainly the four I've mentioned above aren't perfect, but when I research these countries and compare them to the USA, it seems like the better deal =p

But again, maybe I'm wrong, maybe some up-standing citizens of the USA can convince me that remaining a citizen is the better option.

(before you ask, yes I've researched it, and I understand that moving to either of the four mentioned above is no small, or easy, deal.)


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Granyaski VIP Member

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#2 7 years ago
computernerd;5580636It started as a playful thought, but the more I think of it the more seriously I'm considering moving to Europe, Canada, France, or even Australia in the next decade or two.

Nice of you to mention England :p

Australia seems to be turning into some sort of haven for the younger generation. Even over here theres alot of people who want to go there as its nice weather and they boast decent jobs.

My main reasons are fairly simple: the economy is in the toilet (and yes, I know about Greece's influence on the rest of Europe's economy), the country is run by half-wits who are put in office by equally half-witted people, and it doesn't look like there's going to be any improvement in the near future, at least probably not in my lifetime.

Thats the same for almost every country, UK is a prime example. Brown was a fool and nobody even voted for him to get into power and Cameron isn't that bothered about the lower classes what so ever. Look at Italy and Silvio Berlusconi, enough said there.

My point is every countries economy is'nt doing too well. It is a global recession. It appears you are falling under the influence of 'the grass is always greener on the other side'




MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#3 7 years ago

You could just give it a try and apply for an internship in an interesting country. If you decide to move there the internship might help with getting a job.




Huffardo

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#4 7 years ago
computernerd;5580636I'm considering moving to Europe, Canada, France, or even Australia in the next decade or two.

You should research your alternatives well first to see if they suit your taste, rather than choosing places that everyone has heard of, such as France. As an American who presumably doesn't speak fluent French you don't want to go that route unless you have to.

If you actually know the difference between a continent and a country and are willing to learn a new language, I would suggest looking at economically stable European nations more welcoming towards foreigners. Once you have decided on targets you like, the first thing you need to do is to find a job, since that's usually a requirement for a residence permit.

But be warned, there are messed up things about every country. Whilst salaries are often higher, taxes are as well, and not only are gas prices in most of Europe ridiculous, but other basic items such as food and clothing are often much more expensive than in the US.

US politics may also be extraordinarily atrocious, but there are politicians like that even here in Finland: Paavo Väyrynen - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Yup, that guy built a church on his ranch, and got tax payers to pay 30 % of it. :naughty:

If you do decide to move anywhere further than Canada, don't wait until you have a family before you move. It's much easier when you don't have three expensive shipping containers with belongings and other people to worry about.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

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#5 7 years ago

Have you traveled abroad, computernerd? If not, do so. You'll find plenty of places that are habitable, but being in those places and talking to the locals is the only way to figure out if you'd like to live there. America isn't the only country with idiots, and America isn't the only country with a shitty economy right now.

As you're traveling, take note of two separate things: "how much does it cost to live here?" and "how much would you have to pay me for me to agree to live here?". I've visited a few places. London(haven't been to other parts of England, let alone the UK as a whole), Holland, and Austria seem like they'd be tolerable or pleasant. I'd gladly live in Germany, if for some reason I wasn't living in the USA. There are other places where I'd have to be making a decent chunk of change for me to be fine with living there.




Octovon

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#6 7 years ago
computernerd;5580636My main reasons are fairly simple: the economy is in the toilet (and yes, I know about Greece's influence on the rest of Europe's economy), the country is run by half-wits who are put in office by equally half-witted people, and it doesn't look like there's going to be any improvement in the near future, at least probably not in my lifetime.

To be fair, that should exclude Canada from your list of potential destinations. Our current government is the perfect example of half-wits elected by half-wits and in all honesty it would be hard to find a country that isn't. The economy is in decent shape but our long term prospects are worrisome as the baby-boomer generation ages because the younger generations are going to be saddled with an expanded burden on social security. Maybe that's a bit of a grim view of Canada, but it's the first two things that come to mind when I think of our politics and the country's near future.

If you do want to move to Canada, knowing where you want to go in the country is important because each region is fairly different than the other in respect to culture, politics and especially the economy.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#7 7 years ago

Granyaski;5580658Nice of you to mention England :p

Thats the same for almost every country, UK is a prime example. Brown was a fool and nobody even voted for him to get into power and Cameron isn't that bothered about the lower classes what so ever.[/quote]

Hence the reason I didn't mention the UK ;)

MrFancypants;5580669You could just give it a try and apply for an internship in an interesting country. If you decide to move there the internship might help with getting a job.[/QUOTE]

I've read this, what a lot of people recommend is getting a good job in America first, and then seeing about re-locating to some place like Switzerland or the like.

[QUOTE=Huffardo;5580674]You should research your alternatives well first to see if they suit your taste, rather than choosing places that everyone has heard of, such as France. As an American who presumably doesn't speak fluent French you don't want to go that route unless you have to.

Indeed, from what I've read, Switzerland or Sweden seem like good places. I don't wanna say that I've completely given up on my country just yet. Believe me, I really would like to find good reasons for living out the majority of my life here.

If you actually know the difference between a continent and a country and are willing to learn a new language, I would suggest looking at economically stable European nations more welcoming towards foreigners. Once you have decided on targets you like, the first thing you need to do is to find a job, since that's usually a requirement for a residence permit.

Naturally, I'll probably take some foreign language and international affairs courses while in college.

But be warned, there are messed up things about every country. Whilst salaries are often higher, taxes are as well, and not only are gas prices in most of Europe ridiculous, but other basic items such as food and clothing are often much more expensive than in the US.

I've heard that as well. But, I've also heard that the economy of the two I just mentioned is quite a bit more stable than the US economy (despite Greece).

If you do decide to move anywhere further than Canada, don't wait until you have a family before you move. It's much easier when you don't have three expensive shipping containers with belongings and other people to worry about.

I really don't have any intentions of getting married or starting a family.

[QUOTE=Crazy Wolf;5580676]Have you traveled abroad, computernerd? If not, do so. You'll find plenty of places that are habitable, but being in those places and talking to the locals is the only way to figure out if you'd like to live there.

No, I haven't, but I would like to see if I could swing a study abroad program in college.

America isn't the only country with idiots, and America isn't the only country with a shitty economy right now.

Understood.

As you're traveling, take note of two separate things: "how much does it cost to live here?" and "how much would you have to pay me for me to agree to live here?". I've visited a few places. London(haven't been to other parts of England, let alone the UK as a whole), Holland, and Austria seem like they'd be tolerable or pleasant. I'd gladly live in Germany, if for some reason I wasn't living in the USA. There are other places where I'd have to be making a decent chunk of change for me to be fine with living there.

Yeah, any info or advice definitely helps. I sure as hell wouldn't want to hastily move to somewhere like Yemen or China, and then think, "Oh shit, what was I thinking?" =p


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Schofield VIP Member

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#8 7 years ago

Don't come to Canada, just... just stay away right now. If you're trying to get away from the states, Canada is the last place you want to go because our Prime Minister is trying to turn Canada into the USA.

Other than the political infrastructure in this country, everything else is fine.




Embee

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#9 7 years ago

I heard the Netherlands is a great place to live in, and so is Germany. Their tax-system is good, good healthcare, etc... One thing: don't come to Belgium if you want to start an enterprise or get rich: the taxes are too damn high and the country is starting to get f'ed up anyway.




Huffardo

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#10 7 years ago

computernerd;5580738 I've read this, what a lot of people recommend is getting a good job in America first, and then seeing about re-locating to some place like Switzerland or the like.[/QUOTE] That's probably the easiest route, since the employer sorts everything out for you and you are able to speak English at work. :)

computernerd;5580738Indeed, from what I've read, Switzerland or Sweden seem like good places. I don't wanna say that I've completely given up on my country just yet. Believe me, I really would like to find good reasons for living out the majority of my life here.[/QUOTE] They are good choices. You could always first try to find a more suitable place in the US too, if you are fed up with your current location.

computernerd;5580738Naturally, I'll probably take some foreign language and international affairs courses while in college.[/QUOTE] The availability of those courses is often bad, especially if you are interested in a small language such as Swedish, but don't hesitate to take the chance to take language courses if you go somewhere as an exchange student.

[QUOTE=computernerd;5580738]I've heard that as well. But, I've also heard that the economy of the two I just mentioned is quite a bit more stable than the US economy (despite Greece).

It's certainly true, neither belongs to the eurozone, but a stable national economy isn't necessary going to outweigh the drawbacks of a very high cost of living. It depends on what you value, the US makes a lot of sense if you have a good career, live to work and won't have a family.

Be warned that Sweden is a beacon of feminism with noticeable immigrations problems and a focus to save the world at any national cost; it's not all smooth sailing there either.

[QUOTE=computernerd;5580738]I really don't have any intentions of getting married or starting a family.

That certainly makes things easier.

[QUOTE=computernerd;5580738]No, I haven't, but I would like to see if I could swing a study abroad program in college.

If you go to any half-decent collage they'll have exchange programs, and it doesn't have to cost you much more than a year in the US, so it's the perfect way to meet new people and to get to know a place properly.

It's good that you are already planning this, as you can still choose studies that have a market abroad. It would probably be even better to actually study abroad, you'd save money on your degree (thus making up for higher taxes and lower salaries) and have time to learn the local language.




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