Got my first graduate studies rejection letter 67 replies

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Lindæl Advanced Member

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#61 3 years ago

3 semesters is only a year and a half. That degree is going to take much longer.

So, you will need to bus tables for the rest of the time you are there.


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random_soldier1337

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#62 3 years ago

Don't be such a party pooper. I know asked for it, but you didn't have to be so blunt about it.

Anyway, it's an MS. How long is that supposed to take? Last I checked they take 2 years tops. I guess research might extend it.

I'll probably have to figure out the finances but I'm going to take your claim of me having to wait tables with a fair grain of salt. My pockets aren't lined but I am not that poor.




Superfluous Curmudgeon Advanced Member

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#63 3 years ago

"random_soldier1337"

Anyway, it's an MS. How long is that supposed to take? Last I checked they take 2 years tops. I guess research might extend it.

Depends on the number of catch-up courses you need to take, how much research you do, and how much funding you get. And how ambitious/energetic/smart you are. A lot of times schools pay grad students' tuition if they work for the department teaching labs, grading homework, tutoring, etc. Those things tend to take a tremendous amount of time and elongate the program. So, new to the country, I'd expect 2-3 years. Maybe 4 if you don't get into it  right away. 1 year is reserved for those that kill themselves with work and have a head start on grad work (i.e. 5-year bachelor+master programs).




Optical Illusion Forum Moderator

Capybara

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#64 3 years ago

Also depends on whether or not it's a Master of Science or Master of Engineering.  Some of them allow you to choose either a thesis or a project.  


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.



Lindæl Advanced Member

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#65 3 years ago
"random_soldier1337"Anyway, it's an MS. How long is that supposed to take? Last I checked they take 2 years tops. I guess research might extend it.

That is if you already have a Bachelor's degree. So, assuming you do, then after you use up those 3 semesters, you still have one more, minimum. How do you plan to pay for that, plus room and board?

That is assuming all of your credits transfer. If not, then you will need to re-do at least a year, maybe two, or even more. I ran into this problem myself. My degree is from a technical school. So if I wanted to enroll in an actual University, I would need to re-do at least half of those credits. If this is the case, then you are looking at roughly 4 full years from start to finish.

Do you already have a Bachelor's degree, or are you starting from scratch?

If you starting from scratch, then you are looking at a minimum of 6-7 years.

And then, you have the time between Graduation, and getting a job. Chances are, you will never get a job in the field of your degree. If you do, you essentially won the lottery.

To make matters worse, thanks to my American friends, I happen to know that getting a job in that field is actually a requirement for getting the defree. The University will not give you the degree untill you get that job. And no one is going to hire until you get the degree. It is a viscious circle of srewing you over.

If you do manage to get a job, it will be in the form of at least a year of internship, which is just a fancy term for work with no pay.

So, if you want to persue this, and expect to eat, and have a place to sleep, you need to have a solid 10-year financial plan before you start. This means you will need to wait tables for the vast majority of your University time.

That is the harsh truth of the job world.


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Superfluous Curmudgeon Advanced Member

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#66 3 years ago

A lot of engineering fields have a lot of demand for good engineers, and will hire new grads or paid interns if they show potential. There is enough demand for engineers that most internships are paid. I'm not sure where nuclear will go under the Trump administration (or if there will be any jobs left at all in a year or two), but that might be worth looking at and considering whether you should switch fields. Chances are, you might be able to jump into a somewhat similar field like mechanical engineering if things are looking grim in the nuclear field in the next year or two.

You probably have nothing to worry about until America goes completely bankrupt though, as the navy is always looking for engineers to maintain their nuclear-powered navy, and the military budget is one item that I don't see going away any time soon.




random_soldier1337

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#67 3 years ago

"Adrian Ţepeş"Also depends on whether or not it's a Master of Science or Master of Engineering.  Some of them allow you to choose either a thesis or a project.  [/quote]

Master of Science

"Lindale"

"random_soldier1337"Anyway, it's an MS. How long is that supposed to take? Last I checked they take 2 years tops. I guess research might extend it.[/quote] That is if you already have a Bachelor's degree. So, assuming you do, then after you use up those 3 semesters, you still have one more, minimum. How do you plan to pay for that, plus room and board?

That is assuming all of your credits transfer. If not, then you will need to re-do at least a year, maybe two, or even more. I ran into this problem myself. My degree is from a technical school. So if I wanted to enroll in an actual University, I would need to re-do at least half of those credits. If this is the case, then you are looking at roughly 4 full years from start to finish.

Do you already have a Bachelor's degree, or are you starting from scratch?

If you starting from scratch, then you are looking at a minimum of 6-7 years.[/quote]

Got a bachelor's degree. I think you are exaggerating on the redoing. You honestly expect me to believe that they would admit someone that they would have to work on for 2+ years from complete scratch? Anyway, my degree is from outside the American/European/Western system. I'll just have to wait and see what they think about credit transfers.

[quote="Lindale"]And then, you have the time between Graduation, and getting a job. Chances are, you will never get a job in the field of your degree. If you do, you essentially won the lottery.

To make matters worse, thanks to my American friends, I happen to know that getting a job in that field is actually a requirement for getting the defree. The University will not give you the degree untill you get that job. And no one is going to hire until you get the degree. It is a viscious circle of srewing you over.

If you do manage to get a job, it will be in the form of at least a year of internship, which is just a fancy term for work with no pay.

So then just get the internship and get it over with! Well, now that you said you know because of your "American friends" I am definitely going to have to take more salt. I'm not saying that you may be wrong but I am not saying there is no bias either.

[quote="Lindale"]So, if you want to persue this, and expect to eat, and have a place to sleep, you need to have a solid 10-year financial plan before you start. This means you will need to wait tables for the vast majority of your University time.

That is the harsh truth of the job world.

Nope. I can bankroll 3-4 years, at least and that is only considering current backing. This is my lucky break. I am going to make the most of it promptly. I am willing to forgo my luxuries if it means I pursue a career in my desired field. For that matter I have a bias in my defence that a few of my friends entered with no assistantships/scholarships. They worked hard and were offered sums sufficient to cut costs in half or make their education tuition free!

[quote="Superfluous Curmudgeon "]A lot of engineering fields have a lot of demand for good engineers, and will hire new grads or paid interns if they show potential. There is enough demand for engineers that most internships are paid. I'm not sure where nuclear will go under the Trump administration (or if there will be any jobs left at all in a year or two), but that might be worth looking at and considering whether you should switch fields. Chances are, you might be able to jump into a somewhat similar field like mechanical engineering if things are looking grim in the nuclear field in the next year or two.

You probably have nothing to worry about until America goes completely bankrupt though, as the navy is always looking for engineers to maintain their nuclear-powered navy, and the military budget is one item that I don't see going away any time soon.

I like you. You give options instead of ever more worse ways to succumb to the world and accept defeat.




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Capybara

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#68 3 years ago

From what I've been told by professors and other STEM majors, mechanical and electrical seem to be the only sure-fire way to get a job as soon as possible because they are pretty much the most versatile of all the engineering degrees.  With electrical you can find yourself doing anything from microprocessors to even nuclear power, and mechanical gives you a scale generally between nanotechnology and space shuttles.  That's of course assuming you don't already know what field you're devoted to.  IMO, things like civil, environmental, or industrial engineering tend to be programs for people whom already have a vested interest and even passion in those fields.  


"I'd shush her zephyr." ~ Zephyr.