How can you quit something you can't stop... 7 replies

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FileTrekker Über Admin

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#1 7 months ago

So it was nearly 3 years ago now when I quit smoking, and while it was an incredibly easy thing to do, I've found it infinitely easier than quitting eating unhealthy foods.

While I have tried to eat healthier and do to some degree, I still eat bad food 3 - 4 times a week, sometimes more, but it's just so hard because unlike smoking, eating is not something I can survive without, I will HAVE to eat every day. For me I find it infinitely harder than quitting smoking.

The other issue is almost every food is bad for you, even the things you think might be healthy. While some food I eat is a lot healthier than I used to eat (for example a pasta salad is better than a Big Mac & Chips)  people are still turning round and saying that it's bad for you and I shouldn't eat it.

How do I win this one?


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



MrFancypants Forum Admin

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#2 7 months ago

Maybe I'm not the best example, but for a  year or so I managed to complelty change the way I eat from very unhealthy to rather healthy. Now I have suffered a relapse.

In my case it was due to positive/negative influence of other people and laziness to prepare food. I moved to another city for a job and lived there alone, travelling to my wife during the weekends. At the new job one of my closest friends started doing a lot of sport and eating healthy food, so it was easy to join. My wife is, like me, a couch potatoe, so at home I'm more exposed to unhealthy food and lots of snacks in front of the TV.

For that time I mostly lived from salat (bought for lunch at work), bread with cheese or salmon as well as curd cheese with fruit. It gives you a lot of protein (which is good if you try to build muscles at the same time) and takes virtually no time to prepare.

Stick to it for 2 weeks or so and it becomes habitual, you stop caring about the sugary shit in supermarket shelves. Plus, if you do sports at the same time you kind of don't want to kill your progress by eating a lot of bad stuff afterwards.


2 years ago I switched jobs again, all colleagues are lazy and I have far less time which makes it more difficult to fit sports or even shopping for food into my schedule. So I'm eating lots of unhealthy stuff again; now it is more of a ritual that helps relaxing at the end of the day (research shows that a combination of fat and sugar has similar effects on your brain as highly addictive drugs). I'm also working very long hours and travelling a lot; pretty sure that this will not end well, but a job that you enjoy can also be addictive in a sense.


Actually, this post is the first time I reflect on all these bad choices in quite a while. But right now I can't seem to muster the willpower to start changing things.






Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#3 7 months ago

I guess my advice would be to make the healthy behaviour easier than the unhealthy behaviour. For instance, I keep sandwich stuff at work. Now, sure, I could go out and get lunch - and some days when I'm not around the office I do. But it's a lot easier a fair bit of the time to make myself a darned sandwich.

It's not about... well, with things like this... it's not about quitting entirely. It's about having a reasonable balance. Like if you previously ate terrible food on seven days out of seven days, and you're eating it on three days out of seven now - great! That's an improvement.




Lindale Forum Mod

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#4 7 months ago

The first thing is to quit cold turkey. Remove it from your life, and remove all access to it from your life. If you have it in your home, you WILL use it.


The second thing is to remove all temptations of it from your life. You do this by replacing that habit with something else. In my case, breaking my addiction to high-powered energy drinks meant making a 1 for 1 switch for something healthy. Instead of bringing an energy drink, I would bring a lactose-free protein shake. Not only am I not dying anymore, but I discovered the protein gives me much more energy than the energy drinks.


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Superfluous Curmudgeon VIP Member

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#5 7 months ago

For me, the only real way is to  just make it inaccessible. Don't buy junk food. If I do buy junk food, even if it just one item like a sugary/fatty trail mix, I'll binge on it. The only real option is to keep it out of the house. If I don't have access to it at home, I'll still crave it once in a while, but won't be motivated enough to go to the store to buy junk food at the moment I am craving it. Also, having some fresh fruit around can take the edge off at night when I am craving sweets. So, discover which foods are healthy for your body and level of activity and only purchase those.There are general rules for what is healthy and what is not, but a huge amount of what is and isn't healthy for you in particular seems to come down to your genetics and gut biome.

Cheat days are acceptable, but only if you stick to a set limit (say, once per week) and have already broken any sort of addiction you  previously had. At least for me, weening doesn't seem to really work. I'll just crave said thing so much I'll stop thinking about what I'm doing after a "cheat day" and go right back into the old unhealthy habit. Depends on you mostly as to which is doable. 




Last edited by Superfluous Curmudgeon 7 months ago

FileTrekker Über Admin

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#6 7 months ago

It's not even having unhealthy food in the house that's the killer for me, it's things like Just Eat that just make it so easy to order something when you've had a long day and you're just tired and can't be arsed.


Danny King | Community Manager | GameFront.com



Superfluous Curmudgeon VIP Member

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#7 7 months ago

Do you have any truly healthy places to order from near you? Meal prepping may also be good, though I've found it's very hard to be consistent in that. Even if it's not consistent though, it's still a step in the right direction, and that's a good thing in my eyes.




Silberio VIP Member

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#8 7 months ago

There's only two things I been trying to quit for years and never been able to, for some reason. Namely smoking (cigarettes, because I'mma hemp it till the day i hit the dirt, take the eternal map and my ashes are used to fertilize another crop of hemp, c'est la vie) and a nasty habit of biting my fingers, which not only makes em look ugly but also it hurts.

The latter I started outta some anxiety coping mechanism when I was 11 I think? something like that, so it's harder to quit than say, smoking, which I'm just consciously postponing until later date.


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