ICANN approves non-strict latin domain names 11 replies

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Junk angel

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28th January 2007

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#1 11 years ago

So yay for for more internet confusion. ICANN has recently approved of arabic domain names. Now this gives a pretty awful precedent.

As I've summed my view somewhere else

Urgh just no. As has been said if you own a site you will now have to just register more domain names. On top of that you will always try to keep a strict latin one as well just due to the fact that a lot of users just don't have the same keysets and a couple of other facts. Right now there's a similar upheavel here about having some non-strict latin characters in domain names here. Basically summing it up as - website owners hate it. Joe users loves it, because he doesn't see the whole implications and registrating companies love it as well.

Honestly we're going to see a phishing mayhem as well as other really idiotic pushes soonish.

source

Web regulator approves Arabic domain names - Yahoo! News




Guest

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#2 11 years ago

I don't see how someone else making a website in the Arabic script is going to effect me. I'll only be going to websites that have a Latin alphabet link anyways.




Junk angel

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#3 11 years ago

The problem is, that arabic is merely a beginning. There's a large number of latin characters which have not been legal. And it creates problems with say a website which has till now had Uloz.to (save.it) and someone else would buy Ulož.to (again save.it but with the correct characters).

On top of that, end users might not see Ƥaypal.com for instance as a phishing attempt website.




Yannick

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#4 11 years ago

www.ɡaminɡforums.com

Try click that link; looks legit right? It's not, and I think you can see the problems that will arise: people will see a link that looks almost perfect, click it, and be taken elsewhere.




Snow_Flake

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#5 11 years ago

Junk angel;5219244The problem is, that arabic is merely a beginning. There's a large number of latin characters which have not been legal. And it creates problems with say a website which has till now had Uloz.to (save.it) and someone else would buy Ulož.to (again save.it but with the correct characters).

On top of that, end users might not see Ƥaypal.com for instance as a phishing attempt website.

I agree, this is opening a hole new wave of phishing websites.




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#6 11 years ago

The way I see things is that it's a political correctness move. And such things are always heavy on the negative implications...




Commissar MercZ

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#7 11 years ago
the savage;5219448The way I see things is that it's a political correctness move. And such things are always heavy on the negative implications...

It's not so much a "politically correct" move (using words talking heads are throwing around now?) as it is one over accessibility, the same way a game might have different localizations (English, German, French, etc) to reach more people.

What the OP is referring to is that it opens up for more ways for phishers to do what they want. You don't necessarily have to be from that country or region to use these things. I used to know some people in New York who owned a .su domain. Nothing would stop me from owning any domain I want to operate a phishing scams, and it gives me more possibilities if I'm not restricted to latin characters.




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#8 11 years ago

Yannick;5219411www.ɡaminɡforums.com

Try click that link; looks legit right? It's not, and I think you can see the problems that will arise: people will see a link that looks almost perfect, click it, and be taken elsewhere.

I don't see the problems. When I roll over in the bottom left it tells me where the link is really going.

Angel's Ƥaypal.com example is a better one. However I don't think it's really that much of an issue. These links are not going to be jumping to the top of Google anytime soon, and if you are clicking on links coming to you from spam e-mail or from spammers on forums you would probably have had issues before.

If anything I would say they should just review all characters that will be added, and disallow ones that could be confusing, such as adding tildes or umlauts to letters. I don't see how allowing entirely different alphabets will generate that much confusion though. It just allows more people to actually access the internet without having to learn a foreign language.




Admiral Donutz Advanced Member

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#9 11 years ago

Allowing more characters and languages (arabic, chinese, japanese, thai, hebrew, ...) does havee it's fare share of pro's and con's:

- More roman characters could allow for domains that match a name better, in plenty of European languages there are more then the 24 default characters as there are many characters that can added (ö,ø, ò, ó ô õ etc.). Up to know you are forced to either spell the name inproperly by leaving out the characters or using alternative spelling methods. ---- Drawback: People,especially those unfamiliar with certain characters, may eithe not notice an accent/special character or don't have a keyboard or language settings that support direct input of these characters. Thus creating the risk of phising sites and certain peopel being unable to type those characters (you'd need to register multiple domains then: you could register both www.øl.nr and www.ol.nr to redirected to your Norwegian beer website...). - Non western countries could set up websites more easily. If your nation uses a non latin based language, you could simply use your own characters (say arabic) so that the name of your business in daily life, matches your internet adres (say your company is called مجلد كتب , rather then using say a translation such as bookbinder.ar you could go simply use مجلد كتب as your domain name) . So across the globe it certainly makes the internet more accesable and easier to use for those who use a completetly different language. In addition, it opens up a much much wider pool to draw domain names from. ---- Drawbacks: Those unfamiliar with your language would find it harder to access your site (but it does make itmuch more easier for your people, as were it might be difficult for them right now... since they are forced to use the roman alphabet, which they may find difficult to handle). And ofcourse scams, using domain names with nearly indistinguishable from the genuine one. To an extend this could be coutered by either registering known look-alike domains aswell or prohibiting the use of more then one alphabet/language in a domain name. To prevent some tricky combination of arab/hebrew/latin/other in URLs.

Oh and common sense.. you'll hve to be extra carefull clicking links in emails, webspages and such and are best of manually entering the domain name of sensitive websites such as your bank, creditcard website.

I think for people on other continents it will be much more comfortable and easy to be abel to use their own language in domain names. The phising factor is a nasty drawback though, but with some rules, guidelines and regulation it should work out and be worth the trade off.

Simply imagen that the internet had used a foreign language (hebrew, japanese, arabic, ...) for domain names and that right now all of us were forced to type in that language to visit websites, I'd imagen you'd be pretty damn pleased to finally be able to simply go to say google.com rather then *insert something funny here*.




ConstanceJill

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#10 11 years ago

Let's just use IP adresses for whatever gets too complicated :D It is true that there certainly will be many problems with domain names owned by companies who had to use names with modified spelling if someone else registers the correctly spelled names before them. In my country we use characters such as "é", "è", "ê", "ç" or "à"... in quite a few words. Some sort of solution to prevent such problems would be that whoever officially allows one to use a domain name would be very careful about what already exists without these "special" characters and allow only those who already own such domains to get the ones which include these characters... or something like that.




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