Internet Toll for bandwidth 15 replies

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NeoPertacus

**it happens

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17th September 2004

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#1 12 years ago
Specifically, such companies want to charge Web sites for the speedy delivery of streaming video, television, movies and other high-bandwidth data to their customers. If they get their way (Congress may vote on the matter before the year is out), the days of wide-open cyberspace are numbered.
The telecom industry sees such remuneration as fair compensation for the substantial cost of maintaining and upgrading the infrastructure that makes high-bandwidth services, such as streaming video, possible.
"We have to remember that some of the companies that we now consider to be titans of the Internet started literally as guys in a garage," Scott says."That's the beauty and the brilliance of the Internet, yet we're cavalierly talking about tossing it out the window."

http://www.popsci.com/popsci/whatsnew/46f84d972e76b010vgnvcm1000004eecbccdrcrd.html

If you feel strongly about this send a letter or email to your state representatives. It doesn't take long and you can bring it to your attention that there are those out there that don't want their lives controlled by corporations.

http://www.congress.org/congressorg/home/




KoЯsakoff

Captain

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7th November 2003

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#2 12 years ago

Another hopeless thing. The internet is not only in the US. And nor are the companies providing it. I'm sure there are governments/companies/people that won't contribute to such a stupid thing.

You already pay for your connection, why pay more. Then another battle will come of who provides it cheaper then the rest while maintaining quality of the service and customer service.




NeoPertacus

**it happens

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#3 12 years ago

I hate to break it to you friend, but the original telecommunication companies are the ones that own and manage the internet backbones. These backbones link the continents together through lines running on the ocean floor. If the communication companies decide they're going to start charging websites for bandwidth then they will do it on a global scale. This will become a global problem before you can say EU.

http://www.telegeography.com/products/map_cable/index.php




Admiral Donutz VIP Member

Wanna go Double Dutch?

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9th December 2003

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#4 12 years ago

I remember a thread like this not more then one or two weeks ago (pub? or here in the GD?).

Anyway I doubt anything like this would pass since the principal of the internet is to share data of anykind so it can be accesed by anyone (you want to grant acces). Charging people for bytes they use would pretty much kill that since you would pay for every bit and byte you receive. Try googling for a few days to find information on a certain subject, it would simply kill the freedom we have. For such a reason I can't see it passing. Even if it did others would probably rise (or expand) to provide the "free" source of information (exluding connection costs). Not every backbone line would be affected either, it's not only American companies who own all intercontinental lines.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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26th May 2003

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#5 12 years ago

If this did happen the internet would fragment in much the same was as certain IRC networks have been known to do in the past. I don't think even Congress are stupid enough to back a thing like that.




Wraith 5

The Fun cannot be Halted!

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11th October 2005

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#6 12 years ago

This would probably only happen with US based sites, it would be hard, and unfair for them to force these restrictions on the rest of the world. Anyways, no-one can officialy claim ownership of the internet, so laws can only be imposed on sites operating in the US.




NeoPertacus

**it happens

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17th September 2004

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#7 12 years ago
Wraith 5This would probably only happen with US based sites, it would be hard, and unfair for them to force these restrictions on the rest of the world. Anyways, no-one can officialy claim ownership of the internet, so laws can only be imposed on sites operating in the US.

The law their purposing is to allow these companies to do this in the US. It has nothing to do with forcing the companies to do anything. If they start doing it here what is to stop them from forcing everyone else to do it.

The corporations that control this stuff are multinational corporations. They outsourced their phone support and training to india long ago. This idea you europeans have about thinking problems over here don't effect you over there is just a backwards. If this happens everyone will pay for it.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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#8 12 years ago

Companies operate with the consent of the law, while they might have the consent to do it in the US as you point out they are multinational companies. I very much doubt the rest of the world would long abide their practices. As for what we could do about it - well possession is nine tenths of the law. These companies might legally own the infrastructure but since they don't exactly have an army with which they could contest that ownership the issue of legality is quite frankly academic.




NeoPertacus

**it happens

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#9 12 years ago

The thing is they don't need an army to protect the actual lines. How many countries do you think could and would hijack a cables running the ocean floor. Even if they could most countries wouldn't.

Btw i just found this on google news. Maybe i was crapping a brick over nothing.

http://www.betanews.com/article/Net_Neutrality_Gets_a_Boost_in_House/1148669407




Nemmerle Forum Mod

Voice of joy and sunshine

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#10 12 years ago
NeoPertacusThe thing is they don't need an army to protect the actual lines. How many countries do you think could and would hijack a cables running the ocean floor. Even if they could most countries wouldn't.

You just need to seize your end of it, which pretty much all countries could manage pretty easily. Telecoms companies would be left with their end of the cables going into the states. And while it would be a loss not to be able to speak to people in the states *shrug*




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