November 11th 25 replies

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{24th SE}DFA

I AM CANADIAN!!!

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20th October 2004

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#1 14 years ago

Hello,As most if not all you people know this Thusday is Remembrance/Veterans Day.We will remember all the men and women that have lost there lives in the wars of the past.To the 50 million people of Europe,Canada and America that lost there lives in World War Two,to the 5 million plus in WW1,to the 54,000 in Korea and to the 300,000 in Vietnam.You will never be forgotten.Now a little poem, In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved, and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. [size=+2]Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.[/size] [size=+2]Thank You for taking your time to read this,and remember,what all these soldiers fought for and are fighting for to this very day,the fight for[/size] [size=+2]FREEDOM [/size]




Ensign Riles VIP Member

No! I'm Spamacus!

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17th June 2003

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#2 14 years ago

In the Great War there really was no side that had a monopoly on virtue. Everyone who fought was at blame for the war. Why don't we remember the Central Powers as well?




{24th SE}DFA

I AM CANADIAN!!!

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20th October 2004

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#3 14 years ago

Im just sayin remember all the soldiers exept for a few countries.




WiseBobo

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9th February 2004

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#4 14 years ago

Quick question(s) for you {24th SE}DFA: Who in your family served in the fighting 69th Infantry Division, what war did they serve in, and where were they stationed?




{24th SE}DFA

I AM CANADIAN!!!

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20th October 2004

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#5 14 years ago

69th is my clan but since it is a real division the answer is no,no one in my family did serve in the 69th.But my grandfather served in the navy and was stationed in Halifax Canada.




Octovon

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5th August 2003

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#6 14 years ago

I had a great-grandfather who fought in WWI in the Western trenches. From what I've heard of him [he died 'bout 30 years ago], he was injured during a German gas attack. I know he won a few medals, I've seen them but I dont remember for sure where they are now. It's been said that Canada was 'born' in the trenches, in battles such as Ypres, la Somme, Passchendaele, Vimy Ridge, Amiens and more.

The 11th of November is a day we remember those who died for our freedom.




Col Jimmy Emeric

Led Zeppelin pwns all

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16th April 2004

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#7 14 years ago

cool poem




J-Dub'

What are these damn animals?

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1st July 2004

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#8 14 years ago

Good poem. Theres quite a bit of military history in my family.




Blank Stare

AE

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24th July 2004

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#9 14 years ago

My grandfather served in the merchant marines in ww2, while shipping supplies to britian he was sunk by a U-boat. My great grandfather served in ww2 also and was in the 82nd airbourne, he conntinued to serve in korea, he never got killed in combat but was shot and blasted a few times by artillary. My dad also was in vietnam, he knew he was going to be drafted and he had an education so he joined the airforce as a mechanic insted of being dragged into a bloodbath. My great great great grandfather served in the US civil war but that doesnt count since he was fighting for the confederation. :p




Octovon

Spaceman

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5th August 2003

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#10 14 years ago
Col Jimmy Emericcool poem

In case you have not heard it before its "In Flanders Fields" written in 1915 by the Canadian doctor and poet, John McCrae, who later died in 1918 before the war ended. It is recited at almost every Rememberance Day ceremony in Canada and has taken on. Parts of the poem are found on the Canadian $10 bill along with a drawing of the national war memorial in Ottawa.