Pain to Damage Correlation 10 replies

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random_soldier1337

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#1 4 years ago

When exercising, what would be the good kind of pain and what kind of pain would tell you that you need to hold back for a while?

I'm sort of confused and slightly concerned as I don't want to overexert myself and hurt myself permanently.

EDIT: I know I may be asking for personal experience which may take bias into consideration such as different individuals' pain thresholds (i.e. one man's excruciating may be another's meh...) but please try to keep a serious and objective view.




Supa

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#2 4 years ago

I'm not sure you'll really know until after the workout is over... I mean, unless you die while you're working out. I'd say take it easy, do what you think is difficult, consistently, over a moderate period of time, and then step it up once it becomes comfortable. Don't overdo yourself right away.

And you're right about pain threshold being different for everyone, but it also has different meanings. How much something hurts, how much of that pain you handle, etc.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#3 4 years ago

You can damage yourself permanently with absolutely no initial pain, damage can build over time. I've seen a few martial artists who've screwed their knees over the years just by persistently putting the wrong stresses on them, and people who work with computers who've screwed their backs from sitting at the desk wrong.

However: My experience with my own training (martial arts, running, swimming, some weight lifting, cardio) leads me to believe that there is no good kind of pain. By the time you're getting up to noticeable amounts of something that could actually be called pain, above just this muscle feels slightly stiff/warm, in my experience I've been over-training. I've had to wait a lot longer after doing things that have caused pain before I can meaningfully train that set of muscles again than I have otherwise.

I've run past my limits a few times in my training - just pushing to see what the failure point is. Run until you can't run any more, lift until you can't make your arms do it any more. That sort of thing. There's probably another 50-75% or so left in the tank at the point I'd normally back off. But I know if I use it I'll pay for it later and I've always regretted doing so.

The general consensus from people I've talked to who also engage in some kind of training, primarily martial artists, swimmers, and runners agrees that anything above a dull ache or 'a mild burning sensation' is ill advised.

My advice would be not to do anything that hurts above a dull ache without supervision from an incredibly trustworthy source. You don't want to end up like some of those CrossFit competitors ^_^




D3matt

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#4 4 years ago

Working out shouldn't cause legitimate pain, just muscle soreness. You should be able to tell the difference immediately between normal muscle soreness and something else like joint pain or a torn muscle, and take that as an indicator you're doing something wrong. I've lifted as much as my pitiful arms can lift and never felt any actual pain from doing so.




random_soldier1337

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#5 4 years ago

Nemmerle;5733381You can damage yourself permanently with absolutely no initial pain, damage can build over time. I've seen a few martial artists who've screwed their knees over the years just by persistently putting the wrong stresses on them, and people who work with computers who've screwed their backs from sitting at the desk wrong.[/QUOTE]

What would these particular stresses on the knees be? If nothing else I should be able to get around till the day I die instead of having to become snail or bedridden.

Nemmerle;5733381The general consensus from people I've talked to who also engage in some kind of training, primarily martial artists, swimmers, and runners agrees that anything above a dull ache or 'a mild burning sensation' is ill advised.

My advice would be not to do anything that hurts above a dull ache without supervision from an incredibly trustworthy source. You don't want to end up like some of those CrossFit competitors ^_^

I'm not quite sure... in my opinion it feels MAYBE a little more than a dull ache/burning sensation. Maybe even different but it is fairly inconsistent. Sometimes it takes up to an hour to become completely unnoticeable, other times it doesn't even take more than 5 minutes. Is there anything in particular that I might want to pay attention to next time around? Isn't there some pressure point I could just press like a button to give me an indication of if my limb is okay or not (nothing for okay, sharp sting for not)?? Maybe I'll comment on it over the next few days just to make sure I'm not doing something wrong.

[QUOTE=D3matt;5733406]Working out shouldn't cause legitimate pain, just muscle soreness. You should be able to tell the difference immediately between normal muscle soreness and something else like joint pain or a torn muscle, and take that as an indicator you're doing something wrong. I've lifted as much as my pitiful arms can lift and never felt any actual pain from doing so.

And what exactly does joint pain or a torn muscle feel like? As I said, the pain threshold and mental conditioning thing may also play a role in me feeling that it's okay as opposed to I should attend to it.

-----

Also, while running, is the effect of slight but frequent inclines as well turns (once every 20 or 30 meters) to be considered? The inclines are nothing major, just 20 or 30 (max) degrees over 2 or 3 meter planes with some speedbreakers some of which are slightly lengthier than they should be. Anything about consistent right or left turns?

Finally, can breathing also play a role in the pain that one feels or if it becomes seriously detrimental? Say if I push myself too much, with barely enough oxygen to spare would the levels of lactic acid buildup or general lack of blood flow cause my body to be unable to cope up with upkeep required during a workout thereby causing damage to my body over time with each workout until it becomes very serious?




D3matt

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#6 4 years ago
random_soldier1337;5733421And what exactly does joint pain or a torn muscle feel like? As I said, the pain threshold and mental conditioning thing may also play a role in me feeling that it's okay as opposed to I should attend to it.

That's a bit difficult to describe... But it would be distinctly different than normal muscle fatigue, and you WILL know the difference if you're paying even the remotest attention to your body, which you should be. Working out should not cause pain, at all. Soreness/stiffness/fatigue, yes. But not pain. It's a difference you have to feel for yourself, I can't describe it. But I can distinctly tell the difference between having a sore muscle in my ankle, and landing on my ankle funny and hurting it, for example.

If you're feeling something different than normal, that's a good sign you should further investigate. Asking on a gaming forum to describe the difference is not good investigation. if you're genuinely concerned, see somebody. Otherwise, just take it easy on that limb until it goes away.

It might also help to be a little specific...




Biiviz

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#7 4 years ago

You can march for kilometers without noticing that your boots are starting to fill with blood.




D3matt

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#8 4 years ago
Biiviz;5733439You can march for kilometers without noticing that your boots are starting to fill with blood.

Nobody said that abscence of pain meant you were safe, just that pain was always bad.




Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#9 4 years ago
Biiviz;5733439You can march for kilometers without noticing that your boots are starting to fill with blood.

Don't remind me (>_>)


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random_soldier1337

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#10 4 years ago

D3matt;5733435That's a bit difficult to describe... But it would be distinctly different than normal muscle fatigue, and you WILL know the difference if you're paying even the remotest attention to your body, which you should be. Working out should not cause pain, at all. Soreness/stiffness/fatigue, yes. But not pain. It's a difference you have to feel for yourself, I can't describe it. But I can distinctly tell the difference between having a sore muscle in my ankle, and landing on my ankle funny and hurting it, for example.

If you're feeling something different than normal, that's a good sign you should further investigate. Asking on a gaming forum to describe the difference is not good investigation. if you're genuinely concerned, see somebody. Otherwise, just take it easy on that limb until it goes away.

It might also help to be a little specific...[/QUOTE]

Well, I sort of googled around a bit but I, personally, wasn't quite satisfied with the answers, and decided some personal experiences would help me get a better perspective.

Another detail I suppose would be that the pain does feel SLIGHTLY SHARPER than what I would assume to be a dull ache/burning sensation but ,as I mentioned earlier, it dissipates within an hour at most. Mostly it's within 10-15 minutes that everything feels alright once my breathing has normalized and I decide to sit down. There is no pain, otherwise, whenever I use my legs except post running, as I mentioned. It does seem to be more pronounced and prolonged in my left leg though.

Also, I'm not sure whether my posts are actually being read after the first. I'm trying to be as specific as I can. If there is something in particular that you would like to know, I will tell you. Otherwise, is something off about the way I make my statements? Are they not as concise as they could be? I realize some of you must be busy and trying to help as best as you can within the limited time you have but if I'm still posting it means I haven't exactly gotten all the answers I needed. Please think about that, just a tiny bit.

[QUOTE=Biiviz;5733439]You can march for kilometers without noticing that your boots are starting to fill with blood.

Are you actually going to address what I asked or does there always have to be somebody trying to derail the thread with their pseudo-philosophical trolling attempt? It's not like all the questions I had in my last post were fully answered.




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