Question about Uni fees 25 replies

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random_soldier1337

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#1 2 years ago

Why is it that in rich first world countries, locals pay like some $10000 p.a., and foreigners, who may not be from rich first world countries, have to pay like $50000 p.a., for uni/institutes?




Lindale Forum Mod

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#2 2 years ago

Capitalism, plain and simple. Make make as much money as you can, any way you can. In this case, it works because foreigners (for the most part) don't take the time to research local stuff, culture, economy, and the like. That means they don't know locals are only paying this much, so they think the price they pay is just the price everyone pays. So they don't know they are being taken advantage of.


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Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#3 2 years ago

It depends on the university.  If you want to attend UGA but you live in Florida you end up paying up to three times the tuition a Georgia resident pays.  However, most private and ivy-league (Harvard, Yale, Cornell, etc.) schools charge a flat-rate for everyone regardless of where they were born.

The private and ivy-league schools do also offer a lot of need-based grants, so say your parents have a combined income of about $40k then Harvard would instead charge $10k a year as opposed to the normal $40-50k a year.  


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Red Menace

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#4 2 years ago
"Lindale"Capitalism, plain and simple. Make make as much money as you can, any way you can. In this case, it works because foreigners (for the most part) don't take the time to research local stuff, culture, economy, and the like. That means they don't know locals are only paying this much, so they think the price they pay is just the price everyone pays. So they don't know they are being taken advantage of.

Or ... that they are public institutions that my  taxes fund. Therefore, my offspring and I shouldn't pay as much as someone who doesn't pay into the system through taxation. But sure, KKKapitali$m.


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Andron Taps Forum Mod

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#5 2 years ago
"Lindale"because foreigners (for the most part) don't take the time to research local stuff, culture, economy, and the like.

That's a very unfortunate statement...


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Lindale Forum Mod

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#6 2 years ago
"Red Menace"Or ... that they are public institutions that my  taxes fund.

As far as I know, that only applies to primary and secondary school, not University.

Every University I know about is funded by your own bank account, your rich parents, or from you getting student loans. Government grants and scholarships do reduce the price, but you still need to pay the rest yourself.


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random_soldier1337

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#7 2 years ago

"Lindale"Capitalism, plain and simple. Make make as much money as you can, any way you can. In this case, it works because foreigners (for the most part) don't take the time to research local stuff, culture, economy, and the like. That means they don't know locals are only paying this much, so they think the price they pay is just the price everyone pays. So they don't know they are being taken advantage of.[/quote]

How do you think I found out about this? Well I suppose you're speaking for people in general.

"Adrian Ţepeş"It depends on the university.  If you want to attend UGA but you live in Florida you end up paying up to three times the tuition a Georgia resident pays.  However, most private and ivy-league (Harvard, Yale, Cornell, etc.) schools charge a flat-rate for everyone regardless of where they were born.

The private and ivy-league schools do also offer a lot of need-based grants, so say your parents have a combined income of about $40k then Harvard would instead charge $10k a year as opposed to the normal $40-50k a year.  [/quote]

I was talking about international students, not students from a different state. I don't think I saw any such clause for internationals while looking at the Harvard and University of Toronto website.

[quote="Red Menace"][quote="Lindale"]Capitalism, plain and simple. Make make as much money as you can, any way you can. In this case, it works because foreigners (for the most part) don't take the time to research local stuff, culture, economy, and the like. That means they don't know locals are only paying this much, so they think the price they pay is just the price everyone pays. So they don't know they are being taken advantage of.

Or ... that they are public institutions that my  taxes fund. Therefore, my offspring and I shouldn't pay as much as someone who doesn't pay into the system through taxation. But sure, KKKapitali$m.

Why would I pay taxes on income I either don't have or don't make within your country? I would already be paying all the other taxes your govt. deems fit on products I purchase and what not. I wouldn't be staying for free either. Not like I wouldn't pay for the water, the electricity, the rent, food, the institute and what not.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#8 2 years ago

An education is generally an investment made by society in the student. At least in my country, universities are very heavily subsidised by the state, which takes on various financial liabilities to allow their continued trading. It makes little sense for a society to make that investment in people who are not going to be a part of it, when their investment is never going to show dividends. 




Nittany Tiger Forum Mod

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#9 2 years ago

It's an unfortunate truth that education costs and arm and a leg in the states, and oftentimes sticks students with loads of debt with no guarantee of a good job to pay it off after college, but there are scholarships and grants for those that made good grades or play sports, have a low income, or are minorities.

I'm on the fence when it comes to free higher education, and I would happily tell people to avoid college if the financial payoff isn't worth the debt or the vocational problems of not being in the workforce full-time for 4 years or more.  On the other thing, I think education is valuable for a strong, moral society because it empowers people with (supposedly) unbiased knowledge they can use to make better decisions and build a better society.




Nemmerle Forum Mod

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#10 2 years ago

Outside of specialist professions that hook up fairly directly to the university curricula, I'd tend to say that learning how to research, analyse and address problems; both as teams and as individuals; is the more worthwhile prize. Not one I see on offer very often, but still.

I'd be a big proponent of running university courses closer to jobs on that front. You've got people coming out after four years who've never led a meeting, never worked with team members to address a problem, never done a whole bunch of things that are really important to actually using knowledge.