Questions regarding hair inheritence. 33 replies

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Captain Fist

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17th December 2005

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#1 10 years ago

Your genes for your hair patterns come from your mother, correct? Whether or not you bald and so on, and that, of course, comes from your grandfather. My grandfather is Chinese, balding, and so on, he has a very light amount of body hair. My father is Italian, therefor, like a walking gorilla. I'm wondering, when I get older, will I be basically hairless, or be a hairy caveman? Do the genes for facial hair and body hair come completely from your grandfather?




Granyaski VIP Member

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#2 10 years ago

genes for your hair usually doesn't play much effect....of course you may have long hair like your mothers etc but it's mainly down to enviromental factors




Junk angel

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#3 10 years ago

Genes for your hair come from both parents, not just your mother - as far as I know there's only about one geneset which is only form the mother (due to it being located on the tail end of the sperm, which does almost never fuse with the egg)

But yeah, enviromental factors, the amount of exercising you do (moderate longterm leads to less balding, none or too excessive to early balding), diet and other things play a really big role as well. Often bigger.




Granyaski VIP Member

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#4 10 years ago

Junk angel;4787990Genes for your hair come from both parents, not just your mother - as far as I know there's only about one geneset which is only form the mother (due to it being located on the tail end of the sperm, which does almost never fuse with the egg)

But yeah, enviromental factors, the amount of exercising you do (moderate longterm leads to less balding, none or too excessive to early balding), diet and other things play a really big role as well. Often bigger.

well of course it's from both your parents, 2 sets of chromosones.




Inyri Forge VIP Member

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15th March 2005

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#5 10 years ago
Ihaterednecks;4787784I'm wondering, when I get older, will I be basically hairless, or be a hairy caveman? Do the genes for facial hair and body hair come completely from your grandfather?

How old are you? If you were going to be a gorilla you would probably know already. I had a guy in my freshman English class who had more hair than a wildebeest. :lol:




Metall_pingwin

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26th May 2005

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#6 10 years ago

I'm a gorrilla! Roar!

Eastern European blood baby.




whitelancer11

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30th December 2008

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#7 10 years ago

based on studies genes of a child most of the time inherit grandparents traits..




The Body Popper

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#8 10 years ago

Im German, Russian and Italian. I should be like a little Sasquatch. But im not. So that just goes to show that you may not end up looking like either of your parents genes would predict.




Crazy Wolf VIP Member

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#9 10 years ago

Head hair is determined by your mother's father. If he's bald, you might want to consider looking at Rogaine. I'm not sure about the body hair, though.




Inyri Forge VIP Member

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#10 10 years ago
Crazy Wolf;4788497Head hair is determined by your mother's father. If he's bald, you might want to consider looking at Rogaine. I'm not sure about the body hair, though.

One classic example of a sex influenced trait is pattern baldness in humans (sometimes called “male pattern baldness,” though the condition isn’t restricted to males). This gene has two alleles, “bald” and “non-bald.” The behaviors of the products of these genes are highly influenced by the hormones in the individual, particularly by the hormone testosterone. In the presence of high levels of testosterone, the baldness allele has a very powerful influence. In the presence of low levels of testosterone, this allele is quite ineffectual. All humans have testosterone, but males have much higher levels of this hormone than females do. The result is that in males, the baldness allele behaves like a dominant allele, while in females it behaves like a recessive allele. As in all cases, dominance only matters in the heterozygote, so this means that heterozygous males will experience hair loss and heterozygous females will not. Even homozygous females may experience no more than a thinning of their hair, but many develop bald spots or have receding hairlines.

An interesting note about this gene is that it is often incorrectly identified as X-linked because of an illusion that males inherit it from their mothers. Males can inherit baldness from either parent, but if a son gets it from his father, both father and son will be bald, and nobody really notices, as we expect sons to look reasonably like their fathers. But if a son loses his hair and his father doesn’t, that’s noteworthy, and the conclusion people have drawn (correctly) is that Junior inherited baldness from his mother. But recall that with X-linkage sons always inherit traits from their mothers and never from their fathers. In the case of baldness, a son can inherit from either parent. It’s just that we notice it more in the case of inheritance from the mother. This is a kind of casual “sampling error,” in which we subconsciously only “count” the surprising cases and conveniently forget the more ordinary ones.

The second paragraph is of particular note. ;)